Current Jellyfish News and Events | Page 2

Current Jellyfish News and Events, Jellyfish News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 2 of 8 | 317 Results
Green turtles eat plastic that looks like their food
Green turtles are more likely to swallow plastic that resembles their natural diet of sea grass, new research suggests. (2019-08-09)

A novel robotic jellyfish able to perform 3D jet propulsion and maneuvers
Jellyfishes in nature use jet propulsion to move through the water, which have been proven to be one of the most energetically efficient swimmers on the planet. Therefore, the movements of jellyfish have attracted significant interest over the past decade in the context of bioinspired underwater vehicle. Now researchers in Beijing have developed a novel robotic jellyfish able to perform vertical and horizontal jellyfish-like propulsion and maneuvers. (2019-08-05)

Mapping cells in the 'immortal' regenerating hydra
The tiny hydra, a freshwater invertebrate related to jellyfish and corals, has an amazing ability to renew its cells and regenerate damaged tissue. Cut a hydra in half, and it will regenerate its body and nervous system in a couple of days. Researchers at UC Davis have now traced the fate of hydra's cells, revealing how three lines of stem cells become nerves, muscles or other tissues. (2019-07-25)

Black hole brings down curtain on jellyfish galaxy's star turn
The role of an excited black hole in the death of an exotic 'jellyfish' galaxy will be presented today (July 3) by Callum Bellhouse of the University of Birmingham at the RAS National Astronomy Meeting in Lancaster. The supermassive black hole at the center of jellyfish galaxy JO201 is stripping away gas and throwing it out into space, accelerating suppression of star formation and effectively 'killing' the galaxy.  (2019-07-02)

Genomic warning flag just in time for beach season: Jellyfish toxins
An article published today in the Open Access journal GigaScience might make you squirm if you plan to hit the beach. This article presents the draft genomes of three jellyfish species, which have a range of physical traits and level of toxicity. Jellyfish kill more people than sharks, stingrays, and sea snakes combined; thus, having sequences and their analyses available provides an essential resource for future investigation of toxin gene evolution and body shape differences. (2019-06-30)

Deceptively simple: Minute marine animals live in a sophisticated symbiosis with bacteria
Trichoplax, one of the simplest animals on Earth, lives in a highly specific and intimate symbiosis with two types of bacteria. One, Grellia, is related to parasitic bacteria that cause typhus and Rocky Mountain spotted fever. However, it does not appear to harm Trichoplax. The other, Ruthmannia, sits inside the cells Trichoplax uses to digest its food. This symbiosis provides a window into microbial dark matter. The study is published in Nature Microbiology. (2019-06-10)

Rare fossils provide more detailed picture of biodiversity during Middle Ordovician
Marine fossil specimens unearthed in northern Portugal are filling a gap in understanding evolution during the Middle Ordovician period. (2019-06-04)

A question of time
Researchers show how the immune system distinguishes between self molecules and non-self molecules such as those from pathogens. (2019-05-03)

Deadly box jellyfish antidote discovered using CRISPR genome editing
Researchers studying how pain works at the University of Sydney have discovered an antidote to the deadly sting delivered by the most venomous creature on Earth -- the Australian box jellyfish. A single sting to a human causes necrosis of the skin, excruciating pain and, if the dose of venom is large enough, cardiac arrest and death within minutes. The new antidote, discovered using CRISPR genome editing techniques, blocks the symptoms within 15 minutes after contact. (2019-04-30)

Simple sea anemones not so simple after all
New research on tube anemones is challenging everything that evolutionary biologists thought they knew about sea animal genetics. The mitochondrial DNA of the tube anemone, or Ceriantharia, is a real head scratcher, from its unexpected arrangement to its previously unimagined magnitude. (2019-04-23)

What makes a jellyfish?
Genomic study reveals how jellyfish develop into floating beauties, rather than staying stationary like corals or sea anemones. (2019-04-15)

NUS researchers create water-resistant electronic skin with self-healing abilities
Inspired by jellyfish, NUS researchers have created an electronic skin that is transparent, stretchable, touch-sensitive, and repairs itself in both wet and dry conditions. The novel material has wide-ranging uses, from water-resistant touch screens to soft robots aimed at mimicking biological tissues. (2019-03-18)

Tracking turtles with telemetry
A new model has been created that can forecast the location of Eastern Pacific leatherback turtles along the coast of Central and South America in an effort to decrease bycatch mortality of this critically endangered and ecologically important species. (2019-03-14)

Unprecedented number of warm-water species moved northward during marine heatwave
A UC Davis study documents an unprecedented number of southern marine species moving northward into California and as far north as Oregon during the 2014-2016 marine heatwave. Of 67 rare, warm-water species sightings observed, 37 had never been documented so far north before. (2019-03-12)

Sleep tight! Researchers identify the beneficial role of sleep
Why do animals sleep? Why do humans 'waste' a third of their lives sleeping? Researchers now reveal a novel and unexpected function of sleep that they believe could explain how sleep and sleep disturbances affect brain performance, aging and various brain disorders. Using 3D time-lapse imaging techniques in live zebrafish, they were able to define sleep in a single chromosome resolution and show that single neurons require sleep in order to perform nuclear maintenance. (2019-03-05)

Sea worms and jellyfish treat cancer and kill insects
Scientists of the Pacific Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry (PIBOC) of the Far Eastern Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences (FEB RAS) and the Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) found out marine invertebrates living in Troitsa Bay, the Sea of Japan, contain biologically active compounds with strong antitumor and antimicrobial properties, and also capable of killing insects. An article on that was published in the Russian Journal of Marine Biology. (2019-02-14)

Penguins, starfish, whales: Which animals will win and lose in a warming Antarctic?
Using risk assessments, like those used for setting occupational safety limits in the workplace, researchers determined the winners and losers of climate change in the Antarctic. They show that marine animals associated with sea ice for food or breeding, such as some whales and penguins, are most at risk from the effects of climate change, while seafloor predators and open-water feeding animals like starfish and jellyfish will benefit from the opening up of new habitat. (2019-01-17)

Jellyfish map could be the future to protecting UK waters and fish
A University of Southampton research team has developed a map of chemicals found in Jellyfish caught across 1 million square-kilometres of UK waters. The same chemicals are found in other marine animals such as birds and fish. These findings can support conservation efforts by helping track an animals movements and also be used as a tool to detect food fraud by identifying where seafood products were sourced from. (2019-01-16)

Variable venom -- why are some snakes deadlier than others?
By comparing records of venom potency and quantity for over 100 venomous snake species, researchers have discoverd that the potency of a snake's venom depends on what it eats. (2019-01-08)

First jellyfish genome reveals ancient beginnings of complex body plan
The first in-depth look at the genome of a jellyfish -- the moon jelly Aurelia aurita -- shows that early jellyfish recycled existing genes to gain the ability to morph from polyp to medusa. (2018-12-03)

Popular science helps to discover the abundance of this jellyfish
When the Rhizostoma luteum jellyfish was discovered at the beginning of the 19th century in the waters of the Strait of Gibraltar, only nine specimens were identified. For years, it was so inconspicuous that later, in the 20th century, it failed to turn up for six decades. A team of scientists, with the help of a citizen initiative, has now confirmed that it is not really as difficult to find as previously believed. (2018-11-13)

New study helps explain recent scarcity of Bay nettles
A new, long-term study of how environmental conditions affect the abundance and distribution of jellyfish in the nation's largest estuary helps explain the widely reported scarcity of sea nettles within Chesapeake Bay during the past few months and raises concerns about how a long-term continuation of this trend might harm Bay fisheries as climate continues to warm. (2018-10-10)

No more Iron Man: submarines now have soft, robotic arms
The human arm can perform a wide range of extremely delicate and coordinated movements. The robotic 'arms' on underwater research submarines, however, lack the finesse to reach and interact with soft-bodied sea creatures. A new system from the Wyss Institute and collaborators lets biologists intuitively control a modular, highly flexible soft robotic arm by wearing a glove equipped with wireless soft sensors. This system also could one day enable the creation of submarine-based research labs. (2018-10-03)

Scientists created proteins controlled by light
Researchers developed fluorescent proteins that can be controlled by orange and green light. These proteins will help to study processes in living cells. The work was supported by Russian Science Foundation (RSF) grant, and the results were published in Nature Methods. (2018-09-28)

New study probes the ancient past of a body plan code
Researchers from the Stowers Institute for Medical Research have opened a window on another piece of evolutionary biology. They have found that Hox genes, which are key regulators of the way the bodies of bilaterally symmetrical animals form, also play a role in controlling the radially symmetric body plan of the starlet sea anemone, Nematostella vectensis. (2018-09-27)

How a 'jellyfish'-shaped structure relieves pressure in your cells
Scientists at Scripps Research have solved the structure of a key protein that senses when our cells swell. (2018-08-16)

Predatory sea corals team up to feed on stinging jellyfish
Cave-dwelling corals in the Mediterranean can work alongside one another to catch and eat stinging jellyfish, a study reveals. (2018-07-31)

Origami-inspired device enables easy capture, release of delicate underwater organisms
A new device developed by a University of Rhode Island engineer and researchers at Harvard University safely traps delicate sea creatures inside a folding polyhedral enclosure and lets them go without harm using a novel, origami-inspired design. (2018-07-19)

An underwater pokéball for capturing sea creatures
The ocean is home to millions of soft-bodied creatures -- jellyfish, sponges, octopuses, squid, etc. -- that are difficult to study using existing equipment, which was developed for the oil and gas industry and frequently destroys the delicate animals they're meant to sample. A new device from researchers at Harvard's Wyss Institute employs a rotating, folding polyhedron to harmlessly capture and release marine life in the wild. (2018-07-18)

Polyps will let unrelated 'others' fuse to them and share tissue, scientists discover
University of Kansas scientists discovered that polyps have no qualms about treating a nonrelated individual like part of the family. This goes way beyond sharing meals or even a roof. Polyps of the marine hydrozoan Ectopleura larynx allow nonrelated individuals to fuse their bodies to the familial colony and share what is essentially skin and a stomach. The findings appeared yesterday in the journal Evolution Letters.  (2018-07-12)

Releasing our inner jellyfish in the fight against infection
How mucus genes dating back to our time as a jellyfish could be key in our quest for new antibiotics. (2018-07-09)

Currents propel the spreading of invasive jellyfish
Twelve years ago, the comb jelly Mnemiopsis leidyi, originating from the North American East Coast, appeared in northern European waters. Based on the first comprehensive data collection on the occurrence of this invasive jellyfish in Europe, scientists from 19 countries led by the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel and Technical University of Denmark have now shown that ocean currents play a key role for this successful invasion. The study has been published in the international journal Global Ecology and Biogeography. (2018-05-25)

Structure of a protein complex related with cell survival revealed
A team from the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) has determined for the first time the high-resolution structure of a complex (R2TP) involved in key processes for cell survival and in diseases such as cancer. This achievement has been made possible by using high-resolution cryo-electron microscopy. (2018-04-16)

Monterey Bay Aquarium study finds sea turtles use flippers to manipulate food
Sea turtles use their flippers to handle prey despite the limbs being evolutionarily designed for locomotion, a discovery by Monterey Bay Aquarium researchers published in PeerJ. Research by Jessica Fujii and Dr. Kyle Van Houtan and others reveals a behavior thought to be less likely in marine tetrapods is actually widespread and that this type of exaptation of flippers may have been occurring 70 million years earlier than previously thought. (2018-03-28)

Bioengineering team's 'circuit' work may benefit gene therapy
Researchers at The University of Texas at Dallas have designed genetic 'circuits' out of living cellular material in order to gain a better understanding of how proteins function, with the goal of making improvements. (2018-03-06)

A leopard may not change its spots but venomous creatures change their venom recipe often
For a long time scientists believed that an animal's venom was consistent over time. However, through a close study of sea anemones, Dr. Yehu Moran of Hebrew University found that animals change their venom several times over the course of a lifetime, adapting the potency and makeup of their venom to suit changing predators and aquatic environments. (2018-03-05)

Capturing the balance of nature
Researchers capture dynamic changes in marine life over twelve years. (2018-03-02)

In living color: seeing cells from outside the body with synthetic bioluminescence
Glowing creatures like fireflies and jellyfish are captivating to look at but also a boon for science, as their bioluminescent molecules contribute to visualizing a host of biological processes. Now, scientists in Japan have supercharged these molecules, making them hundreds of times brighter in deep tissues and allowing for imaging of cells from outside the body. The bioengineered light source was used to track cancer cells in mice and brain-cell activity in monkeys, but its applications extend beyond the lab. (2018-02-22)

Fancy a jellyfish chip?
Mathias Clausen, a Danish researcher, became intrigued by jellyfish when he bit into the marine delicacy and experienced an unexpected crunch; he decided he wanted to 'understand the transformation from soft gel to this crunchy thing.' Clausen and other scientists combined their expertise in biophysics and biochemistry to gain a better understanding of how food preparation affects jellyfish from the inside out. They will present their work during the 62nd Biophysical Society, held Feb. 17-21. (2018-02-20)

Bright and stable: New acid-tolerant green fluorescent protein for bioimaging
Fluorescent proteins (FPs) are powerful tools for visualization of molecular and cellular processes; however, most FPs lose fluorescence at a pH lower than their neutral pKa (~6). A team of Osaka University researchers developed the acid-tolerant green FP -- termed Gamillus -- cloned from flower hat jellyfish. Gamillus exhibits excellent brightness, maturation speed, and photostablity, even in low pH environments, making it a feasible molecular tag for imaging in acidic organelles. (2018-01-04)

Page 2 of 8 | 317 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.