Current Job Satisfaction News and Events

Current Job Satisfaction News and Events, Job Satisfaction News Articles.
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Depressed and out of work? Therapy may help you find a job
If depression is making it more difficult for some unemployed people to land a job, one type of therapy may help, research suggests. In a new study, 41% of unemployed or underemployed people undergoing cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) found a new job or went from part- to full-time work by the end of the 16-week treatment for depression. (2021-02-22)

Perception critical to women's breast reconstruction decision making
Women who undergo surgical treatment for breast cancer often also have reconstructive surgery but new research from QUT in Australia reveals many feel left out of the decision making process. Approximately one in every three women surveyed stated their surgeon had more input than they did. (2021-02-18)

Paper: STEM skills gap modest among IT help desk workers
The incidence of prolonged hiring difficulties for workers with science and technology backgrounds is consistent with persistent hiring frictions and not a 'skills gap' in the labor market for information technology help desk workers, one of the largest computer occupations in the US, says new research by U. of I. labor professor Andrew Weaver. (2021-02-18)

Study suggests link between DNA and marriage satisfaction in newlyweds
New study from a University of Arkansas psychologist suggests a link between DNA and traits beneficial to bonding and satisfaction in first years of marriage. (2021-02-18)

Physical therapy after c-section improves outcomes
Women who received physical therapy after undergoing a cesarean section had significantly improved outcomes compared to those who did not according to a new study from University of Missouri Health Care. (2021-02-17)

Answer quickly to be believed
When people pause before replying to a question, even for just a few seconds, their answers are perceived to be less sincere and credible than if they had replied immediately, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. (2021-02-16)

LGBT+ workers experience higher levels of conflict at work, shows new report
The CIPD is today launching a new research report, co-authored by the University of Bath's Dr Luke Fletcher, to highlight how LGBT+ workers tend to have a more negative experience of work. (2021-02-11)

How messenger substances influence individual decision-making
A research team of psychologists and physicists from Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf (HHU) and Otto von Guericke University Magdeburg investigated the neurobiological processes in various forms of decision-making. They report in the journal Nature Communications that a different ratio of two messenger substances affects short-term and long-term strategic decisions differently. (2021-02-10)

Study finds U.S. first responders have mixed feelings about COVID-19 vaccine
Firefighters and emergency medical services workers are at high risk of exposure to COVID-19 while on the job and pose an additional risk of transmitting the virus to others. Although vaccines are a promising public health tool for reducing COVID-19 transmission, little has been known about the perceptions of the COVID-19 vaccine among first responders. (2021-02-10)

Time management can work but in unexpected ways, according to new research
Concordia University postdoc Brad Aeon and his colleagues Aïda Faber of Université Laval in Quebec City and Alexandra Panaccio, associate professor of management at John Molson, conducted a first-of-its-kind meta-analysis of time management literature. Their study pored over data from 158 separate studies spanning four decades, six continents and involving more than 53,000 respondents. Their conclusion? Yes, time management does work. Though maybe not as one might initially think. (2021-02-04)

Good customer service can lead to higher profits, even for utilities without competition
New research finds that satisfied customers mean increased profits even for public utilities that don't face competition. It found that customer satisfaction does not lead to increased profits via higher rates or greater demand suggests current regulatory controls are effective. The findings suggest regulators should view investments in customer satisfaction as recoverable costs. (2021-02-02)

Trauma surgeons and emergency surgeons positively impact patient satisfaction
A large study has found that effective and meaningful physician communication is a more important contributor to the overall satisfaction of trauma patients and those having emergency surgery than it is for patients admitted to the hospital for medical reasons or for elective procedures. (2021-01-29)

Less job stress for workers at financially transparent firms
Employees feel significantly less job distress if they work at companies that are open and transparent about the firm's finances, including budgets and profits, a new study found. Researchers examining data from the U.K. found that at companies with more financial transparency, workers felt more secure in their jobs, more committed to their employers and - most significantly - said they had better relationships with their managers. (2021-01-25)

The public health employment picture: Are graduates meeting the demands of the workforce?
In a study to gain understanding of the future public health workforce, researchers conducted a large-scale analysis of first employment outcomes of public health graduates and found that 78 percent were employed; only 5 percent were not employed and job seeking. These indicators may ultimately expand public health's reach and lead to healthier communities. The study is the first national analysis of of public health employment outcomes, and one of only such analyses ever conducted. (2021-01-25)

Most patients find teledermatology appointments suitable alternative to office visits
Researchers at the George Washington University (GW) surveyed dermatology patients at the GW Medical Faculty Associates to evaluate patient satisfaction with teledermatology appointments. The team found the majority of patients found the experience a suitable alternative to in-person office visits. (2021-01-25)

Does where older US adults die affect their wellbeing at the end of life?
Where people die can affect the quality of their deaths and the end-of-life care that they receive. A study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society found that satisfaction with end-of-life care was rated highest when individuals died at home. (2021-01-21)

How clicks on a job platform can reveal bias
Scientists at ETH Zurich have leveraged big data from recruitment platforms and machine learning to study hiring discrimination. They show that discrimination against immigrants depends, among other things, on the time of day; and that both men and women face discrimination. (2021-01-21)

Rescuers at risk: emergency personnel face trauma and post traumatic stress symptoms
Researchers at the University of Bern's Hospital of Psychiatry have for the first time, demonstrated varying levels of post-traumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) in emergency personnel and rescue workers, with emergency department and psychiatry department staff demonstrating the highest levels of PTSS, suicidal thoughts and dysfunctional coping strategies. The study highlights the urgent need for job-specific training to improve emergency workers' quality of life and ability to cope with work-related trauma. (2021-01-19)

Money matters to happiness--perhaps more than previously thought
Money matters to happiness, perhaps more so than previously thought, according to research from Matthew Killingsworth of the University of Pennsylvania. One potential reason: Higher earners feel an increased sense of control over life. ''Across decisions big and small, having more money gives a person more choices and a greater sense of autonomy,'' he says. (2021-01-18)

Common workplace interactions can trigger suicidal thoughts for employees with mood disorders
Perceived low-grade forms of workplace mistreatment, such as avoiding eye contact or excluding a coworker from conversation, can amplify suicidal thoughts in employees with mood disorders, based on a West Virginia University study. (2021-01-14)

Workaholism leads to mental and physical health problems
Workaholism or work addiction risk is a growing public health concern that can lead to many negative mental and physical health outcomes such as depression, anxiety or sleep disorder. Perception of work (job demands and job control) may become a major cause of employees' work addiction. The international group of researchers including the HSE University scientist explored the link between work addiction risk and health-related outcomes using the framework of Job Demand Control Model. (2021-01-13)

Boomerang performance is on par with internal employees who never left the firm, new paper finds
A new paper contrasts the outcomes for boomerang employees with those of internally promoted employees to help firms determine whether to invest in talent management strategies that include boomerang rehiring or to focus on internal strategies that develop current employees. (2021-01-12)

Wives bore the brunt of child care during the shutdown
Traditional gendered patterns of child care persisted during the COVID-19 shutdown, with more than a third of couples relying on women to provide most or all of it. (2021-01-12)

Consent forms design influences patient willingness to share personal health information
Patients are sometimes asked to share their personal health information for research purposes. Informed consent and trust are critical components in a patient's decision to participate in research. Researchers at the University of Florida conducted a three-arm randomized controlled trial to compare the effects on patient experiences of three electronic consent (e-consent) designs that asked them to share PHI for research purposes. (2021-01-12)

Sexual dysfunction hits some women harder than others as they age
Sexual dysfunction often accompanies the menopause transition. Yet, not all women experience it the same. A new study identified the determinants that affect a woman's risk of sexual dysfunction and sought to determine the effectiveness of hormone therapy in decreasing that risk and modifying sexual behavior. Study results are published online in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS). (2021-01-06)

Frequent travel could make you 7% happier
People dreaming of travel post-COVID-19 now have some scientific data to support their wanderlust. A new study in the journal of Tourism Analysis shows frequent travelers are happier with their lives than people who don't travel at all. (2021-01-04)

More women embracing 'going flat' after mastectomy
A growing number of women forgoing reconstruction after a mastectomy say they're satisfied with their choice, even as some did not feel supported by their physician, according to a study led by researchers at the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center. (2021-01-04)

Community-based programs reduce sexual violence, study shows
Through small, neighborhood classes, researchers at UPMC Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh and Promundo-US significantly reduced sexual violence among teenage boys living in areas of concentrated disadvantage. The study appears in JAMA. (2020-12-22)

Social holidays improve overall well-being
Social holidays improve holiday makers' overall satisfaction with life, as well as satisfaction with the quantity and quality of their leisure time, and social life, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland. The study analysed the effect of social holidays on holiday makers' subjective well-being and experience of inclusion. (2020-12-18)

What lessons can medicine learn from Father Christmas?
As Father Christmas gears up for the busiest 24 hours of his year, what skills does he use to get a seemingly impossible job done effectively and safely - and can they be applied to medicine? (2020-12-16)

Flexible working time as an opportunity to save costs and increase productivity
The Covid-19 pandemic has turned flexible working arrangements a new reality, but differences in employees' preferences and the financial implications for companies still require unravelling. (2020-12-15)

Study IDs four things that make people feel good about using chatbots
A recent study has identified four factors that predict user satisfaction with customer service chatbots. The study also found that a positive chatbot experience was associated with customer loyalty, highlighting the potential importance of the findings to corporate brands. (2020-12-15)

Engineers go microbial to store energy, sequester CO2
By borrowing nature's blueprints for photosynthesis, Cornell University bioengineers have found a way to efficiently absorb and store large-scale, low-cost renewable energy from the sun - while sequestering atmospheric carbon dioxide to use later as a biofuel. (2020-12-15)

St. Edward's University study finds a manly beard may help drive sales
Business researchers conducted five studies to test the ''power of the beard,'' predicting that the beard would be an advantage in sales and service roles. The studies examined the beard's effect on perception of expertise, trustworthiness, likelihood of sales and service satisfaction. Their findings are published online in the Journal of Business Research in their article titled, ''It Grows on You: Perceptions of sales/service personnel with facial hair.'' (2020-12-15)

Financial distress negatively impacts well-being, satisfaction of breast cancer patients
Financial toxicity among breast cancer patients is independently associated with worse psychological well-being following a mastectomy or lumpectomy operation. However, even small improvements in financial pressure associated with treatment-related costs can lead to better mental well-being and higher patient satisfaction with breast reconstruction. (2020-12-11)

Bosses need appreciation, too
'Tis the season to be grateful, even for your boss, according to a recent A new study suggests that when supervisors feel appreciated, it gives them a boost of energy and optimism. In the end, that's good for employees and the organization's bottom line. (2020-12-10)

COVID-19 transmission in nursing homes may be affected by nurses and direct care workers with multip
Nurses and other long-term care workers in nursing homes who hold multiple jobs, may be one of the factors contributing to the spread of COVID-19 in these facilities, according to a new study published in Medical Care Research and Review. The findings examine the likelihood that nurses and direct care workers in long-term care facilities hold a second job, and how demographic differences between the two may affect this probability. (2020-12-07)

UTSA researchers study the effects of parental job loss on families during the pandemic
A team of UTSA researchers has discovered that economic implications because of COVID-19 can have a devastating ripple effect on children. Monica Lawson, assistant professor of psychology, Megan Piel, assistant professor of social work and Michaela Simon, psychology graduate student in the UTSA College for Health, Community and Policy, have recently published a research article on the effects of parental job loss during the COVID-19 pandemic and risk of psychological and physical abuse toward children. (2020-12-07)

Biological diversity evokes happiness
A high biodiversity in our vicinity is as important for life satisfaction as our income, scientists from Senckenberg, the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv), and Kiel University found. All across Europe, the individual enjoyment of life correlates with the number of surrounding bird species. An additional 10% of bird species therefore increases the Europeans' life satisfaction as much as a comparable increase in income. Nature conservation thus constitutes an investment in human well-being. (2020-12-04)

New CCNY-developed resource measures severity of work-related depression
First came their pioneering research a few years ago linking burnout and depression. Now CCNY psychologist Irvin Schonfeld and his University of Neuchâtel collaborator Renzo Bianchi present the Occupational Depression Inventory [ODI], a measure designed to quantify the severity of work-attributed depressive symptoms and establish provisional diagnoses of job-ascribed depression. (2020-12-04)

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