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Current Jobs News and Events, Jobs News Articles.
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Jobs for the boys: How children give voice to gender stereotyped job roles
Children, and especially boys, show stronger stereotyping about masculine and feminine jobs than previously suspected, an innovative study by the University of Sussex reveals. (2020-07-27)

Study: Factors linked to structural racism put latino communities at risk for COVID-19
WASHINGTON, D.C. (July 23, 2020) -- Factors linked to structural racism put Latino communities in the U.S. at high risk of COVID-19, a study published today says. The new study is the first nationwide analysis of COVID-19 cases and deaths among Latinos. (2020-07-23)

Research explores the link between wages, school and cognitive ability in South Africa
Using data sets that only became available in recent years, researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York analyzed the wage impact of cognitive skills in South Africa. (2020-07-22)

Numerous jobs linked to increased risk of knee reconstruction
A major review of knee osteoarthritis (OA), which can lead to knee surgery, pain and loss of mobility, reveals widespread risk of OA, demonstrating a need for prevention outside of traditional workplaces. It the biggest meta-analysis and systematic review of the potentially debilitating knee OA and the first systematic review into the association between job 'titles' and knee OA - finding Increased risk in farmers, construction workers, miners, service workers, houseworkers (i.e. housewives) and cleaners. (2020-07-08)

Certain jobs linked to higher risk of knee osteoarthritis
Workers in jobs that typically involve heavy lifting, frequent climbing, prolonged kneeling, squatting, and standing face an increased risk of developing knee osteoarthritis. That's the conclusion of a new analysis published in Arthritis Care & Research. (2020-07-08)

Desk-based jobs may offer protection against poor cognition in later life
People who work in jobs that require less physical activity - typically office and desk-based jobs - are at a lower risk of subsequent poor cognition than those whose work is more physically active, suggests new research from the University of Cambridge. (2020-07-07)

75% of US workers can't work exclusively from home, face greater risks during pandemic
About three-quarters of US workers, or 108 million people, are in jobs that cannot be done from home during a pandemic, putting these workers at increased risk of exposure to disease. This majority of workers are also at higher risk for other job disruptions such as layoffs, furloughs or hours reductions, a University of Washington study shows. (2020-06-23)

Survey: In Vermont, pandemic's impact falling disproportionately on lower income groups
High percentages of Vermonters agree with the social distancing measures put in place by the state in response to the coronavirus pandemic and have complied with them, according to a new survey. But their attitudes and actions, while protecting their health, have come at a significant economic cost, especially for low income Vermonters, one of several ways in which poorer Vermonters have been disproportionately affected by the pandemic. (2020-06-15)

Opposition to sexual- and gender-minority rights linked to support for Christian dominance
Many Christian and political conservatives in the U.S. support legislation to deny sexual and gender minorities the rights most Americans enjoy: unfettered access to jobs, housing, services and public facilities; the opportunity to marry as they choose; and the right to adopt a child. A new study offers insight into the factors that correlate with support for such laws. (2020-06-11)

How stimulus dollars are spent will affect emissions for decades
The COVID-19 pandemic and subsequent lockdowns have led to a record crash in emissions. But it will be emission levels during the recovery. (2020-06-10)

Green cities roadmap touts COVID-19 recovery stimulus
COVID-19 has helped add urgency to a call for industry and government to support a plan to ensure Australian cities become more sustainable by adopting green roofs, walls and facades. (2020-06-08)

Increased activity not always the best advice for neck and back pain
The Norwegian Directorate for Health and Human Affairs generally recommends more physical activity and less sitting time. But that isn't the right approach to managing neck and back pain for everyone, according to research from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology. (2020-05-28)

Promoting temporary contracts fails to have the desired effect of increasing employment
A study by the UPV/EHU and University of Cambridge explores the actual effect of the labour reforms applied between 1988 and 2012 in countries throughout Europe. Far from meeting the aim of encouraging recruitment, these reforms were found to have caused the rate of temporary employment to increase and indefinite recruitment to fall. The current economic crisis of a health origin could prompt States to put forward models designed to stabilise employment more. (2020-05-21)

Is your job killing you? Stress, lack of autonomy, ability can lead to depression, death
A new study from the Indiana University Kelley School of Business finds that our mental health and mortality have a strong correlation with the amount of autonomy we have at our job, our workload and job demands, and our cognitive ability to deal with those demands. (2020-05-19)

Job skills training leads to long-term reduction in drug abuse
Job skills training for low-income youth does more than just help them get better jobs - it makes them significantly less likely than others to use some illicit drugs, even 16 years later. (2020-05-13)

Study finds stronger links between automation and inequality
A new study co-authored by an MIT economist suggests automation has a bigger impact on the labor market and income inequality than previous research would indicate -- and identifies the year 1987 as a key inflection point in this process, the moment when jobs lost to automation stopped being replaced by an equal number of similar workplace opportunities. (2020-05-06)

Robots help some firms, even while workers across industries struggle
A new study co-authored by an MIT professor reveals an important pattern: Firms that move quickly to use robots tend to add workers to their payroll, while industry job losses are more concentrated in firms that make this change more slowly. The study, by MIT economist Daron Acemoglu, examines the introduction of robots to French manufacturing in recent decades, illuminating the business dynamics and labor implications in granular detail. (2020-05-05)

People think robots are pretty incompetent and not funny, new study says
Detecting gender bias against robots was the original intent of a study that revealed two surprises: The gender bias didn't appear. In its place, people were predisposed to find robots mostly incompetent -- no matter the gender. (2020-05-05)

How many jobs do robots really replace?
MIT economist Daron Acemoglu's new research puts a number on the job costs of automation. (2020-05-04)

Public health training in climate change: What are prospective employers thinking?
Researchers found that 92 percent of employers who responded to a survey on climate change and public health reported need for public health professionals with training in climate change will very likely increase in the next 5 to 10 years. While graduates of public health programs who focus on climate change are in demand in the current job market, these positions appear to be just a small proportion of the total number of jobs available in public health. (2020-05-04)

Low-income workers disproportionally affected by COVID-19
Low-income workers in developing countries face a higher risk of income loss during the COVID-19 lockdown as it is less possible to conduct their jobs from home, suggests a new study from UCL, Bank of Thailand, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid and GRIPS, Tokyo. (2020-04-30)

Millions of US workers at risk of infections on the job
A University of Washington researcher calculates that 14.4 million workers face exposure to infection once a week and 26.7 million at least once a month in the workplace, pointing to an important population needing protection as the novel coronavirus disease, COVID-19, continues to break out across the US. (2020-04-29)

Extra payments motivate sobriety and employment among people recovering from addiction
After a yearlong study of people with opioid dependence, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report evidence that adding $8 an hour to their paychecks may help those in recovery stay drug free longer, as well as encourage them to get and hold regular jobs. (2020-04-20)

Men pose more risk to other road users than women
Men pose more risk to other road users than women do and they are more likely to drive more dangerous vehicles, reveals the first study of its kind, published online in the journal Injury Prevention. (2020-04-06)

New study: National monuments can boost the economy in the American West
A groundbreaking study by Resources for the Future researchers, published in Science Advances, shows that national monuments have had mostly positive effects on local economies in the American West. Using a unique set of data and state-of-the-art statistical methods, the authors determined how 14 monument designations in the Mountain West states affected nearby jobs, wage income, businesses, and industries. (2020-03-18)

National monuments help more than hurt local economies in US West
National monuments in the US West increase the average number of establishments and jobs near the monument and increase the average establishment growth rate, according to a new study by Margaret Walls and colleagues. At the same time, monument designation has no effect on the number of jobs that existed before the monument, and has no effect on mining, forestry and other traditional industries that use public lands. (2020-03-18)

Tax incentives for businesses could contribute to the decline of the middle class
Economic development incentives may do more harm than good, especially for middle-class workers, according to new West Virginia University research. (2020-03-09)

Young teachers happier but say hard work is unrewarded
Newly qualified teachers report higher levels of wellbeing and life satisfaction compared to other graduates, but are more likely to say hard work in Britain is unrewarded, according to UCL research. (2020-03-05)

Young women with breast cancer may face financial hardship after diagnosis
Young women with breast cancer experienced substantial financial difficulties in the wake of a breast cancer diagnosis, even if they had stable jobs with insurance benefits. (2020-03-04)

Job insecurity negatively affects your personality: Study
Drawing on Cybernetic Big Five Theory, this study proposes that chronic job insecurity is associated with an increase in neuroticism and decreases in agreeableness and conscientiousness. (2020-02-26)

Community support groups vital to African american women with breast cancer
Shelley White-Means, Ph.D., a professor at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, is the principal investigator of a paper published this month in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health that found breast cancer support groups play a major role in helping underserved African-American women at risk for or diagnosed with breast cancer in Memphis. (2020-02-25)

Consider workplace AI's impact before it's too late, study says
The paper, ''Beyond Design and Use: How Scholars Should Study Intelligent Design Technologies,'' states that scholars and policymakers need to start thinking about it far more broadly if they want to have a say in what the future looks like. (2020-02-13)

Making 3-D printing smarter with machine learning
3-D printing is often touted as the future of manufacturing. However it has a high degree of error, and manufacturers often need many iterations of a print before they get it right. A team of researchers from USC Viterbi School of Engineering is tackling this problem, with a new set of machine learning algorithms and a software tool called PrintFixer, improving print accuracy by 50 percent or more, making the process more economical and sustainable. (2020-02-11)

Children with ADHD more likely to receive medication if they live in poorer areas
Children with ADHD from the poorest areas are significantly more likely to receive medication as children with ADHD from the most affluent areas, according to the first UK study of its kind. (2020-02-07)

Avoid paying so people work
Unlike the case in many developed countries, the Russian government is ready to provide financial support to all people who are registered unemployed. That said, the amount of benefits paid is so small that most unemployed simply disregard it. Researchers from HSE University undertook a study of how the unemployed are treated in other countries and proposed measures for improving the situation on Russia's labour market. (2020-01-29)

'Cinderella subject' of Sport & Exercise Science vital to keeping Wales healthy & wealthy
Sport and Exercise Science has been described as the 'Cinderella' subject of Wales and a key part of the Welsh economy, according to new labour market data being released at an event in the Assembly tomorrow (Tuesday). (2020-01-27)

Unveiling a new map that reveals the hidden personalities of jobs
It's been long been believed that different personalities align better with different jobs. Large-scale evidence now exists of the distinctive personality profiles that occur across occupations and how, using social media, they can be matched to an individual for the perfect fit. (2019-12-16)

New England fishermen losing jobs due to climate
For decades the biggest threat to the industry has been overfishing, but it is no longer the only threat. According to new research at the University of Delaware, fluctuations in the climate have already cost some New England fishermen their jobs. This specific effect of climate is distinct from the overall job losses and gains caused by other factors, such as changes in market demand, regulatory changes to curb overfishing, and broader economic trends. (2019-12-09)

Unemployment encourages men to try traditionally female-dominated work
A study finds that men who previously worked in male-dominated or mixed-gender fields are significantly more likely to transition to female-dominated jobs following a bout of unemployment, bucking past evidence showing resistance by men to working female-dominated jobs. When they do make the switch, the study finds they reap benefits in wages and job prestige. (2019-12-03)

Lack of sleep may explain why poor people get more heart disease
Insufficient sleep is one reason why disadvantaged groups have more heart disease. That's the finding of a study published today in Cardiovascular Research, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). (2019-11-22)

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