Current Joint Replacement News and Events

Current Joint Replacement News and Events, Joint Replacement News Articles.
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Lab-grown 'mini-bile ducts' used to repair human livers in regenerative medicine first
Scientists at the University of Cambridge have used a technique to grow bile duct organoids - often referred to as 'mini-organs' - in the lab and shown that these can be used to repair damaged human livers. This is the first time that the technique has been used on human organs. (2021-02-18)

Spin hall effect of light with near 100% efficiency
POSTECH-KAIST joint research team develops perfect SHEL using anisotropic metasurfaces. (2021-02-18)

Model predicts likelihood of persistent high-dose opioid use after knee surgery
A new study published in Arthritis Care & Research has identified 10 readily available clinical factors that may predict which patients will persistently use high doses of opioids in the year following knee replacement surgery. (2021-02-03)

Alternate type of surgery may prevent total knee replacement
An underused type of knee surgery in younger patients, called high tibial osteotomy, shows considerable success in reducing the need for total knee replacement, according to new research in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) www.cmaj.ca/lookup/doi/10.1503/cmaj.200934. (2021-02-01)

Losing weight before knee surgery may not be beneficial for people with arthritis: Study
University of Alberta researchers find no evidence that BMI is a good determinant of surgical outcomes for osteoarthritis. (2021-01-27)

ECMO/CRRT in the treatment of critically ill SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia patients
In a new publication from Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications; DOI https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2019.1267, Hai Zou and Shengqing Li from the Institute of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, China consider ECMO/CRRT combined support in the treatment of critically ill SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia patients. (2021-01-22)

Researchers identify nanoparticles that could deliver therapeutic mRNA before birth
Researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and the School of Engineering and Applied Science at the University of Pennsylvania have identified ionizable lipid nanoparticles that could be used to deliver mRNA as part of fetal therapy. The proof-of-concept study, published today in Science Advances, engineered and screened a number of lipid nanoparticle formulations for targeting mouse fetal organs and has laid the groundwork for testing potential therapies to treat genetic diseases before birth. (2021-01-13)

Rice model offers help for new hips
Rice University engineers design a computational model that will ultimately serve as the engine to predict how long a hip implant could last for a specific patient. The unique model incorporates fluid dynamics and the physics of implant wear and aims to streamline trial-and-error in the design of future implants. (2021-01-11)

DeepTFactor predicts transcription factors
A joint research team from KAIST and UCSD has developed a deep neural network named DeepTFactor that predicts transcription factors from protein sequences. DeepTFactor will serve as a useful tool for understanding the regulatory systems of organisms, accelerating the use of deep learning for solving biological problems. (2021-01-05)

Stopping RAS inhibitors tied to worse outcomes in patients with chronic kidney disease
Small studies have suggested that a group of medications called RAS inhibitors may be harmful in persons with advanced chronic kidney disease, and physicians therefore often stop the treatment in such patients. Researchers at Karolinska Institutet now show that although stopping the treatment is linked to a lower risk of requiring dialysis, it is also linked to a higher risk of cardiovascular events and death. The results are published in The Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. (2020-12-29)

Remote monitoring leads to 4x decline in returns to hospital after joint surgery
The rate of hospital readmissions for hip and knee replacement patients declined from roughly 12 percent to 3 percent when they were enrolled in a ''hovering'' program (2020-12-21)

What's the 'true' rate of dislocation after total hip replacement?
The cumulative incidence of hip dislocation following total hip replacement is about 50 percent higher than suggested by simple analysis of hospital data, reports a study in The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio in partnership with Wolters Kluwer. (2020-12-18)

'No such thing as a little bit of pain:' More cancer patients could benefit from rehabilitation
West Virginia University researchers identified the rehabilitation recommendations included in cancer-treatment guidelines from around the world. But the researchers discovered a disconnect between what the guidelines suggested and what many doctors do. (2020-12-17)

Robots could replace real therapy dogs
Robotic animals could be the 'pawfect' replacement for our real-life furry friends, a new study published today by the University of Portsmouth has found. (2020-12-10)

Risk of serious complications during knee replacement 73% higher when a tourniquet is used
The risk of developing serious complications following a knee replacement could be up to 73% higher when a tourniquet is used, compared to surgery without a tourniquet. Serious complications during knee replacement surgery are rare. However, researchers at the University of Warwick found that 5.9% of patients whose operations involved a tourniquet had serious complications needing additional health care, compared to 2.9% in those operated on without a tourniquet. (2020-12-08)

Replacing red meat with plant foods may reduce the risk of heart disease
Replacing red meat with high quality plant foods such as beans, nuts, or soy may be associated with a modestly reduced risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), suggests a study published by The BMJ today. (2020-12-02)

Scoring system improves screening for "dual" heart disease
Aortic stenosis is one of the most common heart valve defects. As well as conventional valve replacement involving open-heart surgery, a less invasive procedure has now been available for some time in the form of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). (2020-11-24)

RASi associated with reduced risk of KRT compared with CCB in CKD patients
In a population-based Swedish database, researchers studied the clinical outcomes of starting renin-angiotensin system inhibitor (RASi) or calcium channel blockers (CCB) in 2,458 patients with CKD G4-5. Compared with CCB, RASi initiation was associated with a lower risk of KRT, but similar risks of mortality and major adverse cardiovascular events. These findings suggest that RASi initiation might slow the progression of kidney disease compared with CCB in patients with advanced CKD, and offer similar cardiovascular protection. (2020-11-24)

Are high-protein total diet replacements the key to maintaining healthy weight?
The results of a study published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition suggest that high-protein total diet replacements are a promising nutritional strategy to combat rising rates of obesity. In particular, the study provides further evidence that diets with a higher proportion of protein might offer a metabolic advantage compared to a diet consisting of the same number of calories, but with a lower proportion of protein. (2020-11-18)

Super-resolution "street view" microscopy hits the SPOT
An advanced technique called SPOT is giving researchers a opportunities to study the sophisticated world of lipid dynamics within cells. (2020-11-18)

Prehistoric shark hid its largest teeth
Some, if not all, early sharks that lived 300 to 400 million years ago not only dropped their lower jaws downward but rotated them outwards when opening their mouths. This enabled them to make the best of their largest, sharpest and inward-facing teeth when catching prey, paleontologists at the Universities of Zurich and Chicago have now shown using CT scanning and 3D printing. (2020-11-18)

Racket sports may worsen knee arthritis
Racket sports like tennis and racquetball appear to accelerate knee joint degeneration in overweight people with osteoarthritis, according to a study being presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA). (2020-11-17)

Scientists pinpoint two new potential therapeutic targets for rheumatoid arthritis
A collaborative team of scientists has pinpointed two new potential therapeutic targets for rheumatoid arthritis - a painful inflammatory disease that affects an estimated 350 million people worldwide. (2020-11-12)

New research reveals potential treatment to delay and manage osteoarthritis
Osteoarthritis (OA), a widely acknowledged cause of disability that affects patients' quality of life and has significant economic impact through healthcare costs and loss of earnings. In a novel study researchers have identified cytoplasmic localized histone deacetalyse 6 (HDAC6) as a promising therapeutic target to postpone development of and possibly treat OA using the HDAC6 inhibitor Tubastatin A. They report their results in The American Journal of Pathology, published by Elsevier. (2020-11-12)

WFIRM scientists create hybrid tissue construct for cartilage regeneration
Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine scientists have developed a method to bioprint a type of cartilage that could someday help restore knee function damaged by arthritis or injury. (2020-11-09)

Study compares racial disparities in unilateral versus bilateral knee replacement
Analyzing data from the NIS - Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project database, researchers at Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) found that African Americans were much less likely to undergo bilateral knee replacement compared to white patients. Regarding in-hospital complication rates, investigators found no significant difference. (2020-11-09)

HSS presents innovative research at 2020 ACR Annual Meeting
At this year's American College of Rheumatology virtual meeting, Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) presented exciting research related to rheumatology and orthopedic surgery. The research focuses on the diagnosis of renal disorders, the risk of venous thromboembolism after total knee replacement (TKR), and the care of pediatric and young adult patients with rheumatologic diseases. There are also studies related to the care of rheumatology patients during the COVID-19 pandemic. (2020-11-09)

Rapid test shows 'solid performance' for diagnosing infection around joint implants
The recently FDA-authorized alpha-defensin lateral flow test is a highly accurate, ten-minute test for diagnosis of periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) - a serious and costly complication of total joint replacement, reports a study in The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio in partnership with Wolters Kluwer. (2020-11-09)

Investigators discover unique immune cells in patients with checkpoint inhibitor-induced arthritis
A study from investigators at Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) and Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston has found that the synovial fluid and blood of people experiencing checkpoint inhibitor-induced arthritis is populated by a type of T cells rarely seen in people with other types of inflammatory arthritis. The findings are being presented at the virtual American College of Rheumatology annual meeting. (2020-11-08)

Tough, strong and heat-endure: Bioinspired material to oust plastics
Being tougher, stronger and more adaptive to heat, a new bioinspired material is here to overtake petroleum-based plastics, thanks to researchers' work on an easy and scalable manufacture method. (2020-11-08)

Kids with arthritis in less affluent families report longer period of morning stiffness
Children with arthritis affecting five or more joints, called polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (polyarticular JIA), living in less affluent families were twice as likely to report more than an hour of morning joint stiffness, compared to their counterparts from more affluent families, according to a study by investigators at Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS). Parents and physicians should be aware that morning joint stiffness may indicate early disease symptoms of polyarticular JIA and serve as a more reliable indicator than pain. (2020-11-07)

Warfarin use significantly increases risk of knee and hip replacement in people with OA
New research shows that use of warfarin is associated with a significantly greater risk of knee and hip replacements in patients with OA. (2020-11-06)

Steroid injections do not hasten the need for knee replacement
New research shows that corticosteroid injections for knee OA treatment do not hasten a patient's progression to a total knee replacement when compared with hyaluronic acid injections. Details of this study was presented at ACR Convergence, the American College of Rheumatology's annual meeting. (2020-11-06)

Methotrexate improves function in people with knee OA after 3 months
A new study presented at ACR Convergence, the American College of Rheumatology's annual meeting, shows that after three months of treatment with oral methotrexate, adults with primary knee osteoarthritis (OA) with inflammation had significant improvements in physical function and inflammation, a sign that this inexpensive, generic pill may be an important intervention for knee OA. (2020-11-06)

Policy, not tech, spurred Danish dominance in wind energy
In a new study focused on Denmark, a global leader in wind energy - a relatively mature and low-cost renewable technology - researchers found that government policies have been the primary driver of that industry's growth and development. (2020-11-06)

Biomarker combination predicts kidney injury in critically ill children
Researchers at the University of Liverpool have identified a unique method of identifying the early signs of a potentially serious condition known as Acute Kidney Injury (AKI). (2020-11-02)

Compression garments reduce strength loss after training
Regular training enhances your strength, but recovery is equally important. Elastic bandages and compression garments are widely used in sports to facilitate recovery and prevent injuries. Now, a research team from Tohoku University has determined that compression garments also reduce strength loss after strenuous exercise. (2020-10-30)

Younger knee replacement patients more likely to require reoperation
Knee replacement surgery, also known as total knee arthroplasty (TKA), is increasing among patients 65 and younger. One study projects a potential 183% increase in the number of TKA and revision TKA surgeries by the year 2030 in that age group, raising concerns about poorer clinical outcomes, lower patient satisfaction and diminished joint survival compared to an older patient population. (2020-10-28)

Theoreticians show which quantum systems are suitable for quantum simulations
A joint research group led by Prof. Jens Eisert of Freie Universit├Ąt Berlin and Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) has shown a way to simulate the quantum physical properties of complex solid state systems. This is done with the help of complex solid state systems that can be studied experimentally. The study was published in the renowned journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS). (2020-10-27)

Shared religious experiences bring couples together
Couples that pray together stay together. It's a common religious saying, but a new study from the University of Georgia is giving the proverb some scientific credence. (2020-10-22)

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