Current Journalism News and Events

Current Journalism News and Events, Journalism News Articles.
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Facebook posts help facilitate belief that HPV vaccine is dangerous to health
Social media has a history of being a popular place for sexual health discussions, and the HPV vaccine is one of the most discussed vaccines on the internet. Monique Luisi, an assistant professor in the University of Missouri School of Journalism, suggests some HPV vaccine-related Facebook posts can help facilitate beliefs that the HPV vaccine is dangerous to one's health. She believes it could inform officials for the ongoing COVID-19 vaccine roll out and distribution. (2021-01-05)

Majority of media stories fail to label 'preprint' COVID-19 research -- study
A new SFU-led study finds that less than half of media stories in early 2020 featuring COVID-19 ''preprint'' research--research that has not yet been peer-reviewed--accurately framed the studies as being preprints or unverified research. (2021-01-05)

Rap music increasingly mixes in mental health metaphors
The proportion of rap songs that referenced depression, suicide and mental health struggles more than doubled between 1998 and 2018, according to a study by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in JAMA Pediatrics. Through their lyrics, rap artists may shape conversations about mental health for their young listeners who are at an increased risk of experiencing mental health issues. (2020-12-07)

Media, NGO framing of climate change affects how people think about issue: studies
In a pair of studies, Hong Tien Vu of the University of Kansas found that the way media organizations and global climate change NGOs frame their messages on the topic does in fact influence how people look at the issue, which in turn affects what action, if any, is taken to fight the problem. (2020-11-16)

Artificial intelligence dives into thousands of WW2 photographs
In a new international cross disciplinary study, researchers from Aarhus University, Denmark and Tampere University, Finland have used artificial intelligence to analyse large amounts of historical photos from WW2. Among other things, the study shows that artificial intelligence can distinguish people and objects in a variety of scenes and even recognise the identity of the photographers based on the content of photos taken by them. (2020-10-28)

Seeing no longer believing: the manipulation of online images
A peace sign from Martin Luther King, Jr, becomes a rude gesture; dolphins in Venice's Grand Canal - manipulated or mis-used images posted as truth. Australian researchers say image editing software is so common and easy to use, it has the power to re-imagine history. Even the White House is doing it and deadline-driven journalists lack the tools to tell the difference, especially when images come from social media. (2020-10-21)

Journalists' Twitter use shows them talking within smaller bubbles
Journalists in Washington, D.C., have long been accused of living in a ''Beltway bubble.'' Their interactions on Twitter, however, show them congregating in even smaller ''microbubbles,'' says a recent study. The journalists within each communicate more among themselves than with journalists outside the group. That means Beltway journalism ''may be even more insular than previously thought,'' say study authors Nikki Usher and Yee Man Margaret Ng, journalism professors at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. (2020-08-05)

BU researcher outlines coronavirus media failures, harms, and recommendations
In a new JAMA editorial, a Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researcher and a health research journalist outline common ways that media, governments, and industry and academic public relations press releases have incompletely and misleadingly reported coronavirus research, and how they can do better. (2020-07-13)

Fair justice systems need open data access
Northwestern University researchers are developing an A.I. platform that provides users with access to the information and insights hidden inside federal court records, regardless of their data and analytic skills. (2020-07-09)

Study: 'Anti-vaxxers' gain traction against HPV vaccine on Facebook
One of the biggest social media sites -- Facebook -- has allowed ''anti-vaxxers'' to gain a stronger voice against the use of the human papillomavirus, or HPV, vaccine, according to a new study from a media expert at the University of Missouri. (2020-07-08)

Examining media coverage of protests worldwide
As anti-racism solidarity protests continue around the world, new research suggests mainstream media have a tendency to focus on the violence and spectacle of a protest rather than the substance. That mentality and approach need to change according to Summer Harlow, assistant professor of journalism at the University of Houston Jack J. Valenti School of Communication. (2020-06-24)

'Game changer' for reporters: 2016 US presidential election coverage
The 2016 US presidential election is considered a 'game changer' for journalists covering the US presidential elections by causing them to dramatically reconsider how they view their role -- either as neutral disseminators of information or impassioned advocates for the truth -- according to researchers at the University of Missouri's School of Journalism. (2020-06-22)

Police stop fewer black drivers at night when a 'veil of darkness' obscures their race
After analyzing 95 million traffic stop records, filed by officers with 21 state patrol agencies and 35 municipal police forces from 2011 to 2018, a Stanford-led research team concluded that 'police stops and search decisions suffer from persistent racial bias.' (2020-05-06)

Views on guns and death penalty are linked to harsh treatment of immigrants
An online study that pulled equally from people who identify as Democrats or Republicans has found subtle new clues that underlie the dehumanization of immigrants. The findings by two University of Oregon researchers were published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2020-04-22)

Journalism is an 'attack surface' for those who spread misinformation
For all the benefits in the expansion of the media landscape, we're still struggling with the spread of misinformation -- and the damage is especially worrisome when it comes to information about science and health. Dan Gillmor, co-founder of the News Co/Lab at Arizona State University's Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication, will discuss his work on improving media literacy during a panel presentation on Feb. 15 as part of the AAAS annual meeting in Seattle, Washington. (2020-02-15)

Role-playing game increases empathy for immigrants, study shows
In a study, college students created a fictional online persona from a randomly assigned country and attempted to navigate the administrative hurdles of obtaining a green card and citizenship. Results showed increased levels of empathy among the students for marginalized groups. (2020-01-30)

Climate change NGOs from rich countries dominate online conversation, study shows
Mass communication professors at the University of Kansas analyzed a year of Twitter activity from nearly 500 climate change NGOs from 79 countries and found those from rich nations were most engaged and had the biggest audience, leaving others at risk of not having their message heard and being left out of the global movement. (2020-01-15)

Research offers new way to assess an organization's public relations
Communication and marketing experts place great weight on an organization's relationship with its public stakeholders, and a new tool allows organizations to better measure and describe the nature of these relationships. (2020-01-03)

Platforms can't settle on 'appropriate' engagement-boosting practices
Researchers at Rutgers University say more consistent standards are needed for advertisers, journalists, influencers and marketers seeking to boost their visibility on platforms such as Google, Facebook and Instagram. (2019-11-18)

Cynical social media voices can erode trust in news media
Amid rising concerns about low public trust in mainstream media institutions, a Rutgers study found that real-life and online social interactions can strongly influence a person's trust in newspaper, TV and online journalism -- but when it comes to online interactions, cynical views are the most influential. (2019-11-04)

In media coverage of climate change, where are the facts?
The New York Times stands out for its coverage of the environment and climate change. Yet, says a UC Berkeley study, its articles on climate change seldom mention key facts behind the scientific consensus that global warming is real - facts that could sway skeptics or clear up confusion, even among climate activists. Such facts - for example, that climate change, once it happens, is permanent -- can easily be slipped into stories to inform the public. (2019-09-19)

'Fake news,' diminishing media trust and the role of social media
Exploring the perception of the 'fake news' phenomenon is critical to combating the ongoing global erosion of trust in the media according to a study co-authored by a University of Houston researcher. (2019-08-01)

Too much screen time for the kids? Grandparents may also be complicit
A new study by Rutgers and other researchers finds that today's grandparents are still true to their traditional fun-loving image -- allowing their grandchildren, while under their supervision, to spend about half of their time on a mobile phone, tablet, computer or TV. (2019-07-08)

What journalism professors are teaching students -- about their futures
A new study from Rice University and Rutgers University finds educators are encouraging aspiring journalists to look for work outside the news business. (2019-06-27)

More than victims: Migration images provide a chance to tell a greater story
Keith Greenwood, an associate professor in the Missouri School of Journalism, has found that a majority of photos depicting the 2015 Syrian refugee crisis portrayed the refugees as victims. (2019-05-29)

US journalism has become more subjective
US-based journalism has gradually shifted away from objective news and offers more opinion-based content that appeals to emotion and relies heavily on argumentation and advocacy, according to a new RAND Corporation report. (2019-05-14)

A study analyzes the academic repercussions of institutional scientific dissemination
Communicating research results to the public generates a range of positive effects on the careers of university professors, according to a study carried out by researchers at Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) and the Universidad de Valencia (UV), which analyzed the perception of university researchers who have participated in institutional communication campaigns. (2019-05-07)

Television programming for children reveals systematic gender inequality
Programming children watch on American TV shows systematic gender inequality, according to new research. (2019-04-30)

Can science writing be automated?
A neural network developed at MIT and elsewhere can ''read'' scientific research papers and generate plain-English summaries of their contents. (2019-04-18)

The whisper room: Moderates on Twitter are losing their voice
MU researcher finds that partisan users form highly partisan social networks on Twitter, moderate users -- or those less politically engaged -- continue to avoid politics, potentially creating an important void on social media. (2019-04-03)

Study: With Twitter, race of the messenger matters
University of Kansas journalism researchers showed real tweets about the NFL anthem protests to a group of millennials. Eye tracking software found they viewed tweets from white males the longest, but self-reported data showed they gave the most credibility to African-American males. (2019-02-22)

Facebook memes during 2016 presidential election differ from gender stereotypes
Facebook political memes of Donald Trump in the 2016 election were more likely to focus on his hairstyle and facial expressions, while those of Hillary Clinton were more likely to center on the email scandal and her relationships -- a contrast to historical gender stereotypes in politics, a Baylor University study has found. (2019-01-28)

A new study shows that wine experts differ by geographic region
Canadian vintners, sommeliers, journalists and other wine experts judge and rate wines differently depending on where in the country they are located. The two regions studied, British Columbia and Quebec, both come from different wine-tasting traditions and this is reflected in how they appraise wine. (2019-01-14)

Foundation funding changes international reporting
Funding by private foundations is inadvertently changing the international journalism it supports, according to a new study led by the University of East Anglia (UEA). Researchers found that journalists change the ways they understand, value and carry out their work when supported by organizations such as the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the Rockefeller Foundation and the Ford Foundation. (2019-01-10)

Study suggests that fear and anger had different effects on conservatives and liberals
The emotional underpinnings of political ideology motivated how the electorate sought and processed information about the 2016 presidential election and the major issue of climate change. ''This has important implications for how political dialogue is shaped,'' said Janet Yang, an expert in the communication of risk information related to science, health and the environment. ''It's not just what the candidates are saying; it's also how we communicate with one another.'' (2019-01-09)

India's right to information act provides lessons on government transparency
Journalists are often assumed to be the biggest utilizers of freedom-of-information legislation, but new UA-led research found that collaborations between journalists, social activists and civil-society organizations were essential to the success of creating a right-to-information agenda in India. (2018-12-17)

Journalists can restore media trust
In a first-of-its-kind study, researchers discovered journalists can increase media trust by speaking out in defense of their profession, while also doing more fact checking. Contrary to long-established practices in which journalists traditionally ignore attacks, researchers found that the combination of fact checking and defending journalism had positive effects, but fact checking alone did not. This combination increased trust in and use of mainstream news. (2018-12-10)

Journalism study evaluates emotions on the job
A study investigating the emotional labor involved in reporting traumatic news events finds key differences between how male and female journalists cope. (2018-10-22)

Public opinion on GMOs might impact similar technologies in stores
Researchers at the University of Missouri have found that an individual's perception of genetically modified organisms might impact their judgments about whether or not nanotechnology-enabled products should be labeled in stores. (2018-10-16)

'Blurred face' news anonymity gets an artificial intelligence spin
Researchers in Simon Fraser University's School of Interactive Arts and Technology (SIAT) have devised a way to replace the use of 'blurring' faces in news reports when anonymity is needed. The team's method uses artificial intelligence (AI) techniques that aim to improve visuals while amplifying emotions tied to the story. (2018-08-01)

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