Current Juvenile Offenders News and Events

Current Juvenile Offenders News and Events, Juvenile Offenders News Articles.
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Sleep keeps teens on track for good mental health
As families settle back into a new school year, sleep experts at the University of South Australia are reminding parents about the importance of teenagers getting enough sleep, cautioning them that insufficient sleep can negatively affect their mental health. (2021-02-10)

New study finds climate change shrinks and shifts juvenile white shark range
Unprecedented sightings of juvenile white sharks at the northern end of Monterey Bay signal a significant shift in the young white sharks' range. Researchers conclude the northward range shift demonstrates the young sharks are being subjected to a loss of suitable thermal habitat, meaning water temperatures within their preferred temperature range are becoming harder to find. (2021-02-09)

Captive-bred juvenile salmon unlikely to become migratory when released into streams
Researchers at the Kobe University Graduate School of Science have revealed that when captive-bred juvenile red-spotted masu salmon are released into natural streams, very few individuals become migrants. This was an important species in the rivers of west Japan for the fishing industry, however in recent years their numbers are declining rapidly. The results of this research offer important suggestions for stocking practices and the management of river environments. (2021-02-08)

Northwestern researcher to discuss consequences of incarceration at AAAS annual meeting
Teplin will moderate the scientific session ''Consequences of Incarceration on Health Inequity and Racial Injustice'' at 2 p.m. EST, Monday, Feb. 8. During the session, she will also present ''Consequences of Incarceration in Detained Youth: A 15-Year Longitudinal Study.'' (2021-02-08)

Adolescent involvement with firearms linked to gun violence in adulthood
A new study by Northwestern University researchers finds involvement with firearms by high-risk youth is associated with firearm violence during adulthood. 'Association of Firearm Access, Use, and Victimization During Adolescence with Firearm Perpetration During Adulthood in a 16-year Longitudinal Study of Youth Involved in the Juvenile Justice System' will publish in JAMA Network Open at 10 a.m. CST, Thursday, Feb. 4. (2021-02-04)

States with more gun laws have lower youth gun violence, Rutgers study finds
Gun violence among children is lower in states with more gun laws, according to a Rutgers-led study. (2021-02-04)

Fish in warming Scottish seas grow faster but reach a smaller size
Researchers have found new evidence that global warming is affecting the size of commercial fish species, documenting for the first time that juvenile fish are getting bigger, as well as confirming that adult fish are getting smaller as sea temperatures rise. The findings are published in the British Ecological Society's Journal of Applied Ecology. (2021-02-03)

Eyes reveal life history of fish
If you look deep into the eyes of a fish, it will tell you its life story. Scientists from the University of California, Davis, demonstrate that they can use stable isotopic analysis of the eye lenses of freshwater fish -- including threatened and endangered salmon -- to reveal a fish's life history and what it ate along the way. (2021-01-28)

Dinosaur embryo find helps crack baby tyrannosaur mystery
They are among the largest predators ever to walk the Earth, but experts have discovered that some baby tyrannosaurs were only the size of a Border Collie dog when they took their first steps. (2021-01-25)

Immunology - Functionality of immune cells in early life
A study by Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich researchers shows that putatively immature dendritic cells found in young children are able to induce robust immune responses. The results could lead to improved vaccination protocols. (2021-01-21)

Filling a crucial gap in aquafarming: ion beam breeding to the rescue
Researchers at RIKEN, Japan successfully created a larger strain of zooplankton by creating mutations with a heavy ion beam, which contributes to improving the survival rate and growth of juvenile fish in aquaculture. (2021-01-15)

Research reveals how teeth functioned and evolved in giant mega-sharks
A pioneering study by University of Bristol researchers finds that the evolution of teeth in the giant prehistoric shark Megalodon and its relatives was a by-product of becoming huge, rather than an adaptation to new feeding habits. (2021-01-13)

Free all non-violent criminals jailed on minor drug offences, say experts
Non-violent offenders serving time for drug use or possession should be freed immediately and their convictions erased, according to research published in the peer-reviewed The American Journal of Bioethics. (2021-01-07)

Focusing on diversion yields positive results for kids with behavioral issues
Researchers at Case Western Reserve University found that focusing on diversion--instead of detention--yields positive results for youth with behavioral health issues (2021-01-04)

Adverse childhood experiences are linked to justice system contact
A new paper released by Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health reports a strong association between a high number of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and contact with the U.S. justice system. Analyzing data from eleven studies, the researchers found that results were consistent across multiple types of justice system contact and across diverse geographic regions of the country. (2020-12-16)

Sights set on curbing gun crime
A community or sub-culture encouraging young men's exposure and obsession with guns - as well as ready access to firearms and drugs - can make gun violence 'all too easy', with Flinders University experts promoting a new direction on managing the global problem. Flinders criminologists conclude that the need to 'dematerialise' the attraction to gun has ''never been greater'' than ''in a post-COVID-19 world in which guns have gained greater salience in many countries''. (2020-12-15)

Restorative justice preferred among the Enga in Papua New Guinea
Most large-scale populations employ a punitive judicial system. Advocates have long called for a more restorative justice system that repairs harm to victims and reintegrates wrongdoers into society. A study analyzing 10 years of court cases of the Enga of Papua New Guinea show that they overwhelmingly emphasize restorative justice, allowing both sides and community members share their story, the community assists paying compensation to the victim, and supports reintegrating the offender back into society. (2020-12-10)

Chemical derived from car tires turns streams toxic, kills coho salmon
For Pacific Northwest coho salmon, returning to spawn in the streams and creeks near urban areas can be a death sentence, thanks to a ubiquitous additive in vehicle tires, a new study reveals. (2020-12-03)

HSS presents innovative research at 2020 ACR Annual Meeting
At this year's American College of Rheumatology virtual meeting, Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) presented exciting research related to rheumatology and orthopedic surgery. The research focuses on the diagnosis of renal disorders, the risk of venous thromboembolism after total knee replacement (TKR), and the care of pediatric and young adult patients with rheumatologic diseases. There are also studies related to the care of rheumatology patients during the COVID-19 pandemic. (2020-11-09)

Kids with arthritis in less affluent families report longer period of morning stiffness
Children with arthritis affecting five or more joints, called polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (polyarticular JIA), living in less affluent families were twice as likely to report more than an hour of morning joint stiffness, compared to their counterparts from more affluent families, according to a study by investigators at Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS). Parents and physicians should be aware that morning joint stiffness may indicate early disease symptoms of polyarticular JIA and serve as a more reliable indicator than pain. (2020-11-07)

Global survey reveals that few children with rheumatic disease report contracting COVID-19
Results from a large, international survey shows that only a small fraction of children with rheumatic diseases reported contracting COVID-19. Those who did become infected with COVID-19 all had benign outcomes and did not develop significant complications, despite the fact that most children were taking immunosuppressive medications. The research was presented at ACR Convergence, the American College of Rheumatology's annual meeting. (2020-11-06)

Baby dinosaurs were 'little adults'
Paleontologists at the University of Bonn (Germany) have described for the first time an almost complete skeleton of a juvenile Plateosaurus and discovered that it looked very similar to its parents even at a young age. That could have important implications for how the young animals lived and moved around. The young Plateosaurus, nicknamed ''Fabian'', was discovered in 2015 at the Frick fossil site in Switzerland. (2020-11-06)

New juvenile idiopathic arthritis guideline emphasizes disease-modifying treatments
The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) will preview the 2021 Guideline for the Treatment of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis at ACR Convergence, the ACR's annual meeting. (2020-11-06)

Plot twist
The black rats weren't supposed to be there, on Palmyra Atoll. Likely arriving at the remote Pacific islet network as stowaways with the US Navy during World War II, the rodents, with no natural predators, simply took over. Omnivorous eating machines, they dined on seabird eggs, native crabs and whatever seed and seedling they could find. (2020-11-04)

Squid jet propulsion can enhance design of underwater robots, vehicles
Squids use a form of jet propulsion that is not well understood, especially when it comes to their hydrodynamics under turbulent flow conditions. Discovering their secrets can help create new designs for bioinspired underwater robots, so researchers are exploring the fundamental mechanism. They describe their numerical study in Physics of Fluids; among their discoveries, they found that thrust production and efficiency are underestimated within laminar, or nonturbulent, flows. (2020-11-03)

Investigation: FDA oversight of clinical trials is lax, slow, secretive and getting worse
The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) oversees most clinical research in the United States, ensuring the integrity of trial data and the safety of study participants -- including most recently a number of high-stakes vaccine and drug trials for COVID-19. (2020-10-01)

Children who take steroids at increased risk for diabetes, high blood pressure, blood clots
Children who take oral steroids to treat asthma or autoimmune diseases have an increased risk of diabetes, high blood pressure, and blood clots, according to Rutgers researchers. The Rutgers study is the first to quantify these complications of oral steroids in a nationwide population of children. (2020-09-17)

Privatized prisons lead to more inmates, longer sentences, study finds
WSU study finds that when states turn to private prisons, the number of criminals incarcerated rises and the length of sentences increases. Private prisons lead to an average increase of 178 new prisoners per million population per year. At an average cost of $60 per day per prisoner, that costs states between $1.9 to $10.6 million per year, if all those additional prisoners are in private prisons. (2020-09-14)

Researchers discover a specific brain circuit damaged by social isolation during childhood
Study shows long-lasting effects and points the way to potential treatments. (2020-08-31)

Boats and ships leave baby reef fish vulnerable to predators
Scientists say the noise from boats and ships slows down the activity of baby fish on coral reefs, which leaves them more vulnerable to their predators. (2020-07-23)

Young dolphins pick their friends wisely
Strategic networking is key to career success, and not just for humans. A study of bottlenose dolphins reveals that in early life, dolphins devote more time to building connections that could give them an edge later on. Analyzing nearly 30 years of records for some 1700 dolphins in Australia, researchers find that dolphins under age 10 seek out peers and activities that could help them forge bonds and build skills they'll need in adulthood. (2020-07-23)

Crown-of-thorns enhance their growth by switching diets early
When juvenile crown-of-thorns starfish switch their diets from coralline algae to corals early after settlement, they exhibit enhanced growth rates for longer and will ultimately get much bigger. (2020-07-21)

Eating habits of baby predator starfish revealed
The varied diet of juvenile crown-of-thorns starfish complicates scientists' ability to age them. This makes plans for the management of this invasive species more difficult, as outbreaks of adults on the reef are unpredictable. (2020-07-20)

Scientists may have found one path to a longer life
Mifepristone appears to extend lifespan in evolutionarily divergent species Drosophila and C. elegans in ways that suggest it may do so in humans, as well. (2020-07-10)

Born to be a cannibal: Genes for feeding behavior in mandarin fish identified
Some mandarin fish species (Sinipercidae) are pure fish-eaters, which feed exclusively on living juvenile fish - also of their own species. A research team led by the Chinese Huazhong Agricultural University (HZAU) and the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) has described the genome of four mandarin fish species and thus also identified genes for cannibalistic eating behaviour. Knowledge of the connections between the genome and feeding behaviour is of interest for sustainable aquaculture. (2020-07-09)

Chinook salmon declines related to changes in freshwater conditions
A new University of Alaska-led study provides the first evidence that declines in many of Alaska's chinook salmon populations can be attributed in part to climate-driven changes in their freshwater habitats. (2020-07-09)

Tibetan antelope thrive at high altitudes using a juvenile form of blood oxygen transport
Adult Tibetan antelope have overcome oxygen deprivation on the high-altitude Tibetan Plateau through an unusual adaptation in which they permanently express a form of hemoglobin (the iron-containing oxygen transport protein in red blood cells) that other members of the cattle family only express as juveniles or when under extreme oxygen deprivation. (2020-06-17)

Traits associated with increased risk of gun use among high-risk adolescents
Research out today identifies traits among high-risk adolescents associated with increased risk for gun use. Among high-risk adolescents, those with greater callous-unemotional traits were more likely to carry a gun and to use a gun during a crime over a four-year period following an initial arrest, according to a study published online in the American Journal of Psychiatry. (2020-06-16)

You are what you eat is as important for fish as it is for people
There is truth in the saying 'you are what you eat'; even more so if you are a salmon or herring swimming off the British Columbia coast, a recent University of British Columbia study discovered. (2020-06-08)

Great white shark diet surprises scientists
The first-ever detailed analysis of the diet of great white sharks has shown they spend more time feeding at the seafloor than many would have expected. (2020-06-07)

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