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Current Juvenile Offenders News and Events, Juvenile Offenders News Articles.
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Early experiences determine how birds build their first nest
Early life experiences of zebra finches have a big effect on the construction of their first homes, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Alberta's Faculty of Science and the University of St. Andrews' School of Biology. (2020-05-12)

Not all psychopaths are violent; a new study may explain why some are 'successful' instead
Psychopathy is widely recognized as a risk factor for violent behavior, but many psychopathic individuals refrain from antisocial or criminal acts. Understanding what leads these psychopaths to be 'successful' has been a mystery. A new study conducted by researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University sheds light on the mechanisms underlying the formation of this 'successful' phenotype. (2020-05-12)

Protecting yourself from the latest internet sex crime
Researchers from Michigan State University released a study on 'sextortion' -- a lesser-known internet crime that poses a threat to adults and minors -- that sheds light on the importance of protecting the public from online criminals. (2020-04-21)

Virtual reality makes empathy easier
Virtual reality activates brain networks that increase your ability to identify with other people, according to new research published in eNeuro. The technology could become a tool in the treatment of violent offenders to empathize more with others. (2020-04-20)

Hidden army: How starfish could build up numbers to attack coral reefs
It is known that crown of thorns starfish lie in wait as algae-eating young before attacking coral. But new research from the University of Sydney shows the starfish that devastates reef habitats can remain in its juvenile vegetarian state for at least 6.5 years. This has big implications for how the coral predator is managed on the Great Barrier Reef. (2020-04-08)

Homo naledi juvenile remains offers clues to how our ancestors grew up
A partial skeleton of Homo naledi represents a rare case of an immature individual, shedding light on the evolution of growth and development in human ancestry, according to a study published April 1, 2020, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Debra Bolter of Modesto Junior College in California and the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, and colleagues. (2020-04-01)

Deleting a gene prevents Type 1 diabetes in mice by disguising insulin-producing cells
Removing a gene from the cells that produce insulin prevents mice from developing Type 1 diabetes by sparing the cells an attack from their own immune system, a new University of Wisconsin-Madison study shows. (2020-03-26)

McMaster professor seeks independent agency to tackle abuse in elite youth sport
The author calls for the establishment of an independent international safeguarding agency for sports to handle athlete disclosures, investigate and process allegations, and to support victims of abuse. The expertise developed could then be used for preventive efforts. But this agency would have to have sufficient cash and clout to be effective. (2020-03-17)

Independent investigative agency needed to tackle abuse in elite youth sport
An independent investigative agency as well as an international offender database are needed to tackle allegations of abuse in elite youth sport properly, urges an expert, in an editorial published online in the British Journal of Sports Medicine. (2020-03-17)

Ocean acidification impacts oysters' memory of environmental stress
Researchers from the University of Washington School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences have discovered that ocean acidification impacts the ability of some oysters to pass down 'memories' of environmental trauma to their offspring. (2020-03-12)

Endangered species on supermarket shelves
Imagine purchasing products from your local grocer, only to find out that those products are comprised of critically endangered species! That's what a team from the University of Hong Kong, Division of Ecology and Biodiversity has recently discovered on Hong Kong supermarket shelves. A team led by Dr David Baker from the University's Conservation Forensics laboratory, has recently published the results from an investigation into European eel products on sale in Hong Kong supermarkets. (2020-03-06)

Desire for excitement fuels young offenders to commit crime, then skill takes over
Young burglars are driven by a desire for excitement when they initially commit crime, new research from the University of Portsmouth has found. (2020-02-25)

Social isolation during adolescence drives long-term disruptions in social behavior
Mount Sinai Researchers find social isolation during key developmental windows drives long term changes to activity patterns of neurons involved in initiating social approach in an animal model. (2020-02-21)

Study reveals hidden risks of estuary development for young salmon
A Simon Fraser University-led research team has found significant evidence that human activity in estuaries is impacting juvenile Pacific and Atlantic salmon. The team's review of 167 peer-reviewed studies identified negative impacts from several stressors, including the effects of flood-protecting tidal gates, pollution and habitat modification. (2020-02-20)

The Lancet Psychiatry: Life-course-persistent antisocial behaviour may be associated with differences in brain structure
Individuals who exhibit life-course-persistent antisocial behaviour - for example, stealing, aggression and violence, bullying, lying, or repeated failure to take care of work or school responsibilities - may have thinner cortex and smaller surface area in regions of the brain previously implicated in studies of antisocial behaviour more broadly, compared to individuals without antisocial behaviour, according to an observational study of 672 participants published in The Lancet Psychiatry journal. (2020-02-17)

Northwestern researcher examines substance use disorders in at-risk youth
Using data from the Northwestern Juvenile Project, Linda Teplin of Northwestern University will examine the persistence and progression of substance use disorders -- including opioid use disorder -- in delinquent youth in a talk at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) annual meeting in Seattle on Friday, Feb. 14. (2020-02-14)

Statewide prevalence of gun ownership tied to police use of lethal force
A new study expands on prior research by examining the impact of the availability of firearms. It finds a pronounced positive relationship between statewide prevalence of gun ownership by citizens and police use of lethal force. (2020-02-14)

Cybercrime: Internet erodes teenage impulse controls
Many teenagers are struggling to control their impulses on the internet, in a scramble for quick thrills and a sense of power online, potentially increasing their risks of becoming cyber criminals. (2020-01-21)

Police platform patrols create 'phantom effect' that cuts crime in London Underground
A major experiment introducing proactive policing to Underground platforms finds that short bursts of patrolling create a ''phantom effect'': 97% of the resulting crime reduction was during periods when police weren't actually present. (2020-01-16)

Attentiveness and trust are especially effective in combating juvenile crime
The criminologist Professor Klaus Boers (University of M√ľnster) and the sociologist Professor Jost Reinecke (University of Bielefeld) have presented the results of their long-term study 'Crime in the modern city.' The scientists have observed and analyzed the delinquency behavior of around 3,000 young people in German cities for almost 20 years. (2020-01-16)

Researchers learn more about teen-age T.Rex
A team led by Holly Woodward Ballard, Ph.D., assistant professor of anatomy at Oklahoma State University Center for Health Sciences, studied two mid-sized tyrannosaur skeletons and concluded they were in fact teenage T.Rex and not a new pygmy species. They also studied the interior of the leg bones to determine age and how the dinosaurs grew and matured. (2020-01-01)

Fish size affects snake river salmon returns more than route through dams
The survival and eventual return of juvenile Snake River salmon and steelhead to spawning streams as adults depends more on their size than the way they pass through hydroelectric dams on their migration to the ocean, new research shows. (2019-11-25)

Platforms can't settle on 'appropriate' engagement-boosting practices
Researchers at Rutgers University say more consistent standards are needed for advertisers, journalists, influencers and marketers seeking to boost their visibility on platforms such as Google, Facebook and Instagram. (2019-11-18)

The global distribution of freshwater plants is controlled by catchment characteristics
Unlike land plants, photosynthesis in many aquatic plants relies on bicarbonate in addition to CO2 to compensate for the low availability of CO2 in water. A study in the scientific journal SCIENCE by Iversen and co-authors shows that the abundance of plant species with the ability to use bicarbonate increases in hard water lakes with greater bicarbonate concentrations. In streams, where the CO2 concentration is higher than in air, bicarbonate users are few. (2019-11-15)

Study shows digital media has damaging impact on reintegration of 'white collar' criminals
Offenders convicted of occupational crime and corruption are having their rehabilitation negatively affected by long term 'labels' attached to them on digital media, according to new research by the University of Portsmouth. (2019-11-15)

Bigger doesn't mean better for hatchery-released salmon
A recent study in the Ecological Society of America's journal Ecosphere examines hatchery practices in regards to how Chinook salmon hatcheries in the PNW are affecting wild populations over the past decades. (2019-11-14)

Additional medications to treat children with JIA are urgently needed
According to new research findings presented this week at the 2019 ACR/ARP Annual Meeting, there is a profound ongoing need for additional medications to control the signs and symptoms of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), despite the availability of several approved biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (biologics). (2019-11-09)

ADA2 is a specific biomarker for MAS in systemic JIA
According to new research findings presented at the 2019 ACR/ARP Annual Meeting, adenosine deaminase 2 (ADA2) in the peripheral blood is a sensitive, specific biomarker for macrophage activation syndrome, a potentially life-threatening complication of systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (systemic JIA). (2019-11-09)

Ancient bone protein reveals which turtles were on the menu in Florida, Caribbean
Thousands of years ago, the inhabitants of modern-day Florida and the Caribbean feasted on sea turtles, leaving behind bones that tell tales of ancient diets and the ocean's past. An international team of scientists used cutting-edge technology to analyze proteins from these bones to help identify which turtle species people fished from the ocean, helping inform conservation efforts today. (2019-11-04)

Risk assessment tools lead to fewer incarcerations without jeopardizing public safety
A sweeping study looking at an extensive collection of data -- involving more than a million offenders at 30 different Canadian and US research sites -- found that while fewer people were being locked up, crime rates showed some declines. (2019-10-28)

Stem cell research leads to insights into how Huntington's disease develops
Huntington's disease (HD) is a fatal hereditary disease for which there is no cure. A novel study from Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, using pluripotent stem cells advances understanding of how the disease develops and may help pave the way for identifying pathways for future treatments. Results are published in the Journal of Huntington's Disease (2019-10-21)

In Baltimore, lower income neighborhoods have bigger mosquitoes
Low-income urban neighborhoods not only have more mosquitoes, but they are larger-bodied, indicating that they could be more efficient at transmitting diseases. So reports a Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies-led study, published in the Journal of Medical Entomology, investigating how socioeconomics influences mosquito-borne disease risk in Baltimore, Maryland. (2019-10-16)

Why rats prefer company of the young and stressed
Researchers have identified a neural pathway implicated in social interaction between adult and juvenile animals, according to new research in rats published in JNeurosci. (2019-10-10)

Right whale mothers 'whisper' to their calves to avoid attracting predators
As new moms, North Atlantic right whales tone down their underwater vocalizations and 'whisper' to their young calves to avoid attracting predators, a new study by scientists at Syracuse University, Duke University and NOAA Fisheries' Northeast Fisheries Center finds. The study is the first to record examples of this acoustic behavior by mother right whales. (2019-10-10)

Big data reveals extraordinary unity underlying life's diversity
Limits to growth lie at the heart of how all living things function, according to a new study carried out by ICTA-UAB researchers. (2019-10-07)

Decoding how kids get into hacking
New research from Michigan State University identified characteristics and gender-specific behaviors in kids that could lead them to become juvenile hackers. The researchers assessed responses from 50,000 teens from around the world to determine predictors of hacking and are the first to dig into gendered differences from a global data set. (2019-09-19)

Study: Bigger cities boost 'social crimes'
The same underlying mechanism that boosts urban innovation and startup businesses can also explain why certain types of crimes, like car theft and robbery, thrive in a larger population. (2019-09-17)

Combating prison recidivism with plants
The United States currently incarcerates the greatest percentage of its population compared with any other nation in the world. The results and information gathered in this study support the notion that horticultural activities can play an important role in influencing an offender's successful reentry into society. (2019-09-06)

New viruses discovered in endangered wild Pacific salmon populations
Three new viruses -- including one from a group of viruses never before shown to infect fish -- have been discovered in endangered Chinook and sockeye salmon populations. While the impact of the viruses on salmon health isn't yet known, all three are related to viruses that cause serious disease in other species. (2019-09-04)

Young adults exposed to incarceration as children prone to depression
Young adults with childhood history of both parental incarceration and juvenile justice involvement were nearly three times more likely to have depression or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) compared to peers without any experience with the criminal justice system, according to a study published in JAMA Network Open. (2019-09-04)

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