Current Kidney Injury News and Events

Current Kidney Injury News and Events, Kidney Injury News Articles.
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Whale Sharks show remarkable capacity to recover from injuries
A new study has for the first time explored the extraordinary rate at which the world's largest fish, the endangered whale shark, can recover from its injuries. The findings reveal that lacerations and abrasions, increasingly caused through collisions with boats, can heal in a matter of weeks and researchers found evidence of partially removed dorsal fins re-growing. (2021-02-23)

New blood pressure-lowering guidelines could benefit 25 million americans with chronic kidney disease
A recommendation for more intensive blood pressure management from an influential global nonprofit that publishes clinical practice guidelines in kidney disease could, if followed, benefit nearly 25 million Americans. (2021-02-23)

New model helping identify pregnant women whose previous kidney injury puts them, babies at risk
Young pregnant women, who appear to have fully recovered from an acute injury that reduced their kidney function, have higher rates of significant problems like preeclampsia and low birthweight babies, problems which indicate their kidneys have not actually fully recovered. MCG scientists have developed a rodent model that is enabling studies to better understand, identify and ideally avoid this recently identified association. (2021-02-22)

Real world data on hospital readmissions of patients with heart failure
In an analysis of information on 448 patients with heart failure who were discharged from a hospital in Sweden, 20.3% of patients were readmitted to the hospital within 30 days, and 60.9% were readmitted within 1 year. The ESC Heart Failure analysis found that most of the patients who needed to be rehospitalized were readmitted for heart failure. (2021-02-18)

MSK physician shares kidney cancer research at annual ASCO GU Symposium
Memorial Sloan Kettering's Robert Motzer presented positive data from a phase III randomized study that assessed two different treatment combinations as first-line therapies that may benefit people with advanced kidney cancer. (2021-02-16)

Cytoglobin: key player in preventing liver disease
Researchers have discovered that the use of Cytoglobin (CYGB) as an intravenous drug could delay liver fibrosis progression in mice. CYGB, discovered in 2001 by Professor Norifumi Kawada, is present in hepatic stellate cells, the cells that produce fibrotic molecules such as collagens when the liver has acute or chronic inflammation induced by different etiologies. The enhancement of CYGB on these cells or the injection of recombinant CYGB has the effect of suppressing liver damage and cirrhosis. (2021-02-16)

Army researchers expand study of ethics, artificial intelligence
The Army of the future will involve humans and autonomous machines working together to accomplish the mission. According to Army researchers, this vision will only succeed if artificial intelligence is perceived to be ethical. (2021-02-16)

Delayed medical treatment of high-impact injuries: A lesson from the Syrian civil war
Researchers report that patients injured in the facial bones by high-speed fire and operated on approximately 2-4 weeks after the injury suffered fewer post-operative complications compared to those wounded who underwent immediate surgical treatment. They hypothesize that this is due to a critical period of time before surgery, which facilitates healing and formation of new blood vessels in the area of the injury and, subsequently, an improvement in the blood and oxygen supply. (2021-02-16)

IU researchers find disease-related gene changes in kidney tissue
Researchers from Indiana University have identified key genetic changes in the interstitial kidney tissue of people with diabetes, a discovery that signifies the potential for a revolutionary new genetic approach to the treatment of kidney disease. They will contribute their findings to the Kidney Precision Medicine Project's (KPMP) ''cell atlas,'' a set of maps used to classify and locate different cell types and structures within the kidney. (2021-02-16)

Researchers discover promising biomarkers to diagnose mild traumatic brain injury
Certain plasma microRNAs could serve as diagnostic biomarkers in mild traumatic brain injury, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows. The biomarkers were discovered in an animal model and they were successfully used also to diagnose mild traumatic brain injury in a subgroup of patients. (2021-02-15)

Cabozantinib most effective treatment for metastatic papillary kidney cancer
In a SWOG Cancer Research Network trial that put three targeted drugs to the test, the small molecule inhibitor cabozantinib was found most effective in treating patients with metastatic papillary kidney cancer - findings expected to change medical practice. (2021-02-13)

Immunotherapy -- targeted drug combination improves survival in advanced kidney cancer
Patients with advanced kidney cancer, who received a targeted drug combined with a checkpoint-blocker immunotherapy agent had longer survival than patients treated with the standard targeted drug, said an investigator from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, reporting results from a phase 3 clinical trial. (2021-02-13)

Novel protein could reverse severe muscle wasting in disease, aging and trauma
Muscle stem cells drive the tissue's growth and repair after such injuries. But growing these cells in the lab and using them to therapeutically replace damaged muscle has been frustratingly difficult. Australian researchers have discovered a factor that triggers these muscle stem cells to proliferate and heal. In a mouse model of severe muscle damage, injections of this naturally occurring protein led to the complete regeneration of muscle and the return of normal movement after severe muscle trauma. (2021-02-10)

Study describes the diversity of genetic changes that cause inherited kidney disease
A study has described genetic changes in patients with the most common form of hereditary kidney disease that affects an estimated 12.5 million people worldwide. The research, which focussed on Polycystic Kidney Disease (PKD) in Ireland, provides insights into PKD that will assist doctors and patients in the management of this of inherited condition. (2021-02-08)

SARS-CoV-2 under the helium ion microscope for the first time
Scientists at Bielefeld University's Faculty of Physics have succeeded for the first time in imaging the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus with a helium ion microscope. In contrast to the more conventional electron microscopy, the samples do not need a thin metal coating in helium ion microscopy. This allows interactions between the coronaviruses and their host cell to be observed particularly clearly. The findings have been published in the Beilstein Journal of Nanotechnology. (2021-02-04)

More than half of cancer survivors have underlying medical conditions associated with severe COVID
New study finds more than half (56.4%) of cancer survivors in the United States reported having additional underlying medical conditions associated with severe COVID-19 illness. (2021-02-03)

On the dot: Novel quantum sensor provides new approach to early diagnosis via imaging
A phenomenon called 'oxidative stress' is seen in affected organs during the early stages of certain difficult-to-treat diseases like cancer and kidney dysfunction. Detecting oxidative stress could thus enable early diagnosis and preventive treatments. But, the in vivo measurement of oxidative stress caused by both oxidation and reduction has historically been difficult. Now, scientists have developed an advanced quantum sensor technology that can detect 'oxidative stress' non-invasively throughout the body using fluorescent imaging and MRI. (2021-02-03)

Study examines role of biomarkers to evaluate kidney injury in cancer patients
A study by Mayo Clinic researchers published in Kidney International Reports finds that immune checkpoint inhibitors, may have negative consequences in some patients, including acute kidney inflammation, known as interstitial nephritis. Immune checkpoint inhibitors are used to treat cancer by stimulating the immune system to attack cancerous cells. (2021-02-03)

Solving a puzzle
University of New Mexico scientists tease out the underlying mechanism of tuberous sclerosis complex (2021-02-03)

Biomedical basis of the Barker hypothesis uncovered
A research group at Inselspital, Bern University Hospital and the University of Bern has published an extensive study on prenatal causes of kidney disease in adults in Nature Communications. The findings reveal that the serum protein fetuin-A plays a key role in attenuating local inflammation and microcalcifications in the fetal kidney, which have consequences for kidney function later in adulthood. The study results provide indications for clinical use of fetuin-A in kidney diseases. (2021-02-02)

Child head injury guidelines created
Australia's and New Zealand's first set of clinical guidelines for children's head injuries has been created. (2021-02-02)

New protein neutralizes COVID in tiny human kidney
Northwestern Medicine scientists have developed a new protein that acts as a trickster to neutralize the COVID-19 infection in a human kidney organoid, a miniature organ made from stem cells in the lab. (2021-02-01)

New weapon for inflammation
Flinders University researchers have discovered a new anti-inflammatory role for well-known blood clot protein fibrinogen, which could support targeted new treatments for kidney, heart and other common diseases. The study in Redox Biology describes how fibrinogen can be protective against hypochlorite - a chemical generated by the body during inflammation - and so act as a kind of antioxidant in blood plasma. (2021-01-31)

Researchers illustrate the need for anti-racism in kidney care, research
There is a growing awareness of systematic inequality and structural racism in American society. Science and medicine are no exception, as evidenced by historical instances of discrimination and overt racism. In a perspective piece in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, researchers from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM), take an honest look at how the current practice of nephrology (kidney medicine) may have elements rooted in racist ideologies. (2021-01-29)

New treatment helps patients with a spinal cord injury
Spinal cord injuries disrupt the mechanism by which our bodies regulate blood pressure. A team of Swiss and Canadian scientists have developed a treatment that allows patients to regain control of their blood pressure, using targeted electrical spinal-cord stimulation. No medication is required. The team's findings were published today in Nature. (2021-01-28)

Research finds blood pressure can be controlled without drugs after spinal cord injury
Canadian and Swiss researchers have created the first platform to understand the mechanisms underlying blood pressure instability after spinal cord injury. The discovery has led to a new cutting-edge solution. Spinal cord stimulators can bridge the body's autonomous regulation system, controlling blood pressure without medication. Findings are published in Nature. (2021-01-27)

Mouse study: gabapentin prevents harmful structural changes in spinal cord
Research led by The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center and College of Medicine found that the widely prescribed pain-relief drug gabapentin can prevent harmful structural changes in the injured spinal cords of mice, and also block cardiovascular changes and immune suppression caused by spinal cord injury. (2021-01-26)

Concordia researchers find melatonin is effective against polycystic kidney disease
Melatonin, a hormone commonly associated with sleep-wake regulation, has been found to reduce cysts in fruit flies, according to Concordia researchers. It's a finding that may affect the way we treat some kidney diseases and reduce the need for kidney transplants. (2021-01-26)

ACSL1 as a main catalyst of CoA conjugation of propionic acid-class NSAIDs in liver
Researchers from Kanazawa University have found that propionic acid-class nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), including ibuprofen, form ''conjugates'' with coenzyme A (CoA) by one of the acyl-CoA synthetases, ACSL1, in liver. These conjugates have the covalent binding ability to cellular proteins that may lead to liver injury, a rare severe side effect of NSAID treatment. This knowledge could help pharmaceutical companies to generate pain control options with fewer risks of severe side effects. (2021-01-22)

Risk factors for intraoperative pressure injury in aortic surgery
In a new publication from Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications; DOI https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2019.1263, Yao Dong, Jun-E Liu and Ling Song from the Capital Medical University, Beijing, China consider risk factors for intraoperative pressure injury in aortic surgery. (2021-01-22)

Study reveals new insights into the link between sunlight exposure and kidney damage
A new collaborative study from researchers at the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth and the University of Washington and published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), reveals unexpected insights into how skin exposure to ultraviolet light can worsen clinical symptoms in autoimmune diseases such as lupus. (2021-01-21)

Mayo Clinic study indicates age influences sex-related outcomes after heart attack
Approximately 1.5 million heart attacks and strokes occur every year in men and women in the US Sex and age play a large part in who experiences a heart attack, the methods used to treat these heart attacks, and the eventual post hospital outcomes of the people who experience heart attacks. Mayo Clinic researchers discuss these sex and age differences in study findings published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. (2021-01-20)

Researchers uncover potentially promising therapeutic combination for renal cell carcinoma
Investigators have demonstrated that ACE2 expression is a good prognostic factor in RCC, that loss of ACE2 mediates resistance to classical treatments, and that in preclinical models, treatment with a drug that is downstream of ACE2 can improve tumor responses in RCC and significantly prolong survival. (2021-01-20)

New research finds connection: Inflammation, metabolism and scleroderma scarring
Study finds NAD+ break down leads to multi organ scarring, providing now a previously undiscovered pathogenic role of the enzyme CD38 in disease scarring. (2021-01-19)

Timing is of the essence when treating brain swelling in mice
Researchers from the National Institutes of Health have discovered Jekyll and Hyde immune cells in the brain that ultimately help with brain repair but early after injury can lead to fatal swelling, suggesting that timing may be critical when administering treatment. These dual-purpose cells, which are called myelomonocytic cells and which are carried to the brain by the blood, are just one type of brain immune cell that NIH researchers tracked, watching in real-time as the brain repaired itself after injury. (2021-01-18)

Designer cytokine makes paralyzed mice walk again
To date, paralysis resulting from spinal cord damage has been irreparable. With a new therapeutic approach, scientists from the Department for Cell Physiology at Ruhr-Universit├Ąt Bochum (RUB) headed by Professor Dietmar Fischer have succeeded for the first time in getting paralyzed mice to walk again. The keys to this are the protein hyper-interleukin-6, which stimulates nerve cells to regenerate, and the way how it is supplied to the animals. (2021-01-15)

Effects of head trauma from intimate partner violence largely unrecognized
Carrie Esopenko, assistant professor at the Rutgers School of Health Professions, speaks on new international effort to understand ramifications of concussions and head and neck injuries sustained due to intimate partner violence. (2021-01-14)

Age matters in identifying maltreatment in infants and young children with fractures
Among children who were not in an independently verified incident, evaluation for child abuse should be done by specialty consultation in children aged less than three-years old presenting with rib fractures and children aged less than 18-months presenting with humeral or femoral fractures. (2021-01-13)

New treatment allows some people with spinal cord injury to regain hand and arm function
University of Washington researchers helped six Seattle-area people with spinal cord injuries regain some hand and arm mobility. (2021-01-12)

Mechanisms in the kidney that control magnesium and calcium levels discovered
The gene KCTD1 directs production of a protein that functions in the kidney to maintain a normal balance of magnesium and calcium in blood. Loss of KCTD1 impairs the ability of the kidney to properly absorb magnesium and calcium from urine in the kidney, leading to abnormally low magnesium and calcium blood levels, thereby triggering the parathyroid glands to secrete excess parathyroid hormone that in turn leads to metabolic bone disease. (2021-01-12)

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