Current Kindergarten News and Events

Current Kindergarten News and Events, Kindergarten News Articles.
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Stress was leading reason teachers quit before pandemic, and COVID has made matters worse
Stress was the most common reason teachers cited for leaving the profession before and during the pandemic, according to a RAND Corporation survey of nearly 1,000 former public-school teachers. Three of four former teachers said work was often or always stressful in the most recent year in which they taught in a public school. Teachers cited stress nearly twice as often as insufficient pay as a reason for quitting. (2021-02-22)

Association of armed guards, severity of school shootings
Researchers examined the association between the presence of an armed guard on scene and the severity of shootings at schools kindergarten through high school. (2021-02-16)

Book developed at Cincinnati Children's helps identify risks of reading difficulties
A study published in the journal Pediatrics expands validation evidence for a new screening tool that directly engages preschool-age children during clinic visits to assess their early literacy skills. The tool, which is the first of its kind, has the potential to identify reading difficulties as early as possible, target interventions and empower families to help their child at home, according to researchers at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center. (2021-02-04)

State-funded pre-K may enhance math achievement
Students who attend the Georgia Prekindergarten Program are more likely to achieve in mathematics than those who do not attend pre-K, according to a new study by the University of Georgia. (2021-02-03)

African American youth who receive positive messages about their racial group may perform better in school
Youth of color represent over half of the school-aged population (kindergarten through twelfth grade) in public schools in the United States. This creates a need for evidence-driven approaches that address the pervasive Black-White achievement gap. A new longitudinal study shows that African American youth who receive positive messages about their racial group in school achieved better school grades one to two years later. (2020-12-16)

Remote learning here to stay despite challenges, survey finds
About two in 10 U.S. school districts have already adopted, plan to adopt or are considering adopting virtual schools after the end of the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a new RAND Corporation study. The survey of district leaders indicates that virtual schooling was the innovative practice that most district leaders anticipated would continue, citing both student and parent demand for continuing various forms of online instruction. (2020-12-15)

What are schools doing to feed students during COVID-19-related closures?
As schools across the United States are grappling with remote and hybrid learning due to the COVID-19 pandemic, a new study in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, published by Elsevier, investigates the initial responses of child nutrition administrative agencies in all 50 US states and the District of Columbia (DC), five US territories, and the US Department of Interior Bureau of Indian Education (BIE). (2020-12-08)

Study finds surprising diversity in early child care
A new study of kindergarteners in one Midwestern state identified seven different pathways the children took in their early education and care before arriving at school. The researchers were surprised by the diverse experiences that kids brought with them to kindergarten: While some received care only in their home or mainly in a child care center, others switched back and forth between different types of care, or had other arrangements. (2020-11-09)

Conflicts in kindergarten can reduce children's interest in reading and math
Teacher-perceived conflict predicts lower interest and pre-academic skills in math and literacy among kindergarteners, a new study from Finland shows. (2020-11-05)

Starting kindergarten on the right foot
Going into kindergarten already well-prepared gives a child advantagesgives a child many advantages later in life and lowers costs for society in the long term, researchers in Canada find. (2020-11-02)

How long does the preschool advantage last?
Children who attend preschool enter kindergarten with greater skills than those who don't, but that advantage is nearly halved by the end of the year as their counterparts quickly begin to catch up, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. (2020-10-05)

School-based vision screening programs found 1 in 10 kids had vision problems
A school-based vision screening program in kindergarten, shown to be effective at identifying untreated vision problems in 1 in 10 students, could be useful to implement widely in diverse communities, according to new research in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) http://www.cmaj.ca/lookup/doi/10.1503/cmaj.191085. (2020-07-20)

Early childhood education centers can boost parents' engagement at home
When early childhood education centers communicate well with parents, those parents are more likely to engage in educational activities with their children at home, a new University of Arizona study finds. (2020-07-07)

School absenteeism has surprising consequences for adults
Kids who miss a lot of school from kindergarten to eighth grade may suffer unexpected costs as young adults, a new study finds. Researchers found that those who were more regularly absent in these early years of school were less likely to vote, reported having greater economic difficulties and had poorer educational outcomes when they were 22 to 23 years old. (2020-07-01)

Tech not hurting social skills of 'kids these days'
Despite the time spent with smartphones and social media, young people today are just as socially skilled as those from the previous generation, a new study suggests. (2020-04-13)

One year into 'soda tax,' researchers find law did not affect sugary-beverage consumption
One year into Philadelphia's 1.5-cents-per-ounce 'soda tax,' new findings show that the law had minimal to no influence on what Philadelphians are drinking. The results were published this month in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health from researchers at Drexel University's Dornsife School of Public Health. (2020-02-26)

Getting children to eat their greens? Both parents need to set an example
A positive example set by both the mother and the father promotes the consumption of vegetables, fruit and berries among 3-5-year-old children, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland. The study explored the association of the home food environment and parental influence with the consumption of vegetables among kindergarten-aged children. (2020-02-20)

Praise, rather than punish, to see up to 30% greater focus in the classroom
To improve behavior in class, teachers should focus on praising children for good behavior, rather than telling them off for being disruptive, according to a new study published in Educational Psychology. (2020-01-29)

Read to kids in Spanish; it'll help their English
Immigrant parents worry their children will struggle with reading and fret that as non-English speakers, they can't help. A new study in the journal Child Development shows that's simply not true. Reading to a young child in any language will help them learn to read in English. (2019-10-15)

Screening kindergarten readiness
University of Missouri College of Education researchers have found that a readiness test can predict kindergarteners' success in school after 18 months. (2019-10-08)

Kids in poor, urban schools learn just as much as others
Schools serving disadvantaged and minority children teach as much to their students as those serving more advantaged kids, according to a new nationwide study. Test scores speak more to what happens outside the classroom than how schools themselves are performing. (2019-09-25)

Emphasizing social play in kindergarten improves academics, reduces teacher burnout
Emphasizing more play, hands-on learning, and students helping one another in kindergarten improves academic outcomes, self-control and attention regulation, finds new UBC research. (2019-09-17)

'Time-outs' not associated with long-term negative effects in children
Researchers find no differences in emotional and behavioral health between kids whose parents reported using time-outs and those who didn't. (2019-09-12)

Study reveals school savings accounts can dry up in 'financial deserts'
College of Business Professor studies the impact geography has on San Francisco's Children's Savings Accounts program. (2019-08-14)

Questions during shared book reading with preschoolers need to be more challenging
When it comes to challenging young minds to grow language, asking how and why during shared book reading to preschoolers can be more beneficial, according to new research at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth). (2019-08-06)

Preschool teachers ask children too many simple questions
When preschool teachers read books in their classrooms, the questions they ask play a key role in how much children learn, research has shown. But a new study that involved observing teachers during class story times found that they asked few questions -- and those that they did ask were usually too simple. (2019-07-25)

School readiness impaired in preschoolers with ADHD symptoms, Stanford study finds
Preschoolers with symptoms of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder are much less likely than other children their age to be ready for school, new research from the Stanford University School of Medicine has found. (2019-07-22)

Certain behaviors in kindergarten associated with lower adult salary
Inattention among kindergarteners was associated with lower earnings as adults in this study based on behavioral ratings from kindergarten teachers for 2,850 children in Canada at ages 5 or 6 and government tax returns for those same children as adults at ages 33 to 35. (2019-06-19)

Inattentive children will earn less money at 35
An international team led by Université de Montréal researchers finds that if kids can't pay attention in kindergarten, they will grow up to have less lucrative careers. (2019-06-19)

Study: Behavior in kindergarten associated with earnings in adulthood
New study found that individuals who were inattentive at age 6 had lower earnings in their 30s after taking into consideration their IQ and family adversity. For males only, individuals who were physically aggressive or oppositional (e.g., who refused to share materials or blamed others) had lower annual earnings in their 30s. And males who were prosocial (e.g., who shared or helped) had higher later earnings. (2019-06-19)

Monitoring educational equity
A centralized, consistently reported system of indicators of educational equity is needed to bring attention to disparities in the US education system, says a new report by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Indicators -- measures used to track performance and monitor change over time -- can help convey why disparities arise, identify groups most affected by them, and inform policy and practice measures to improve equity in pre-K through 12th grade education. (2019-06-13)

Teacher ratings on childhood inattention, prosocial behavior associated with adult earnings
In a study of 920 boys from low-socioeconomic neighborhoods in Montreal, Canada, teacher ratings of inattention in kindergarten at ages 5 and 6 were associated with lower earnings as adults 30 years later, while increased ratings on prosocial behavior (such as helping, sharing and cooperating) were associated with higher earnings after accounting for child IQ and family adversity. (2019-02-11)

Low-income boys' inattention in kindergarten associated with lower earnings 30 years later
A new longitudinal study examined boys from low-income backgrounds to determine which behaviors in kindergarten are associated with earnings in adulthood. The study concluded that inattention was associated with lower earnings and prosocial behavior with higher earnings. (2019-02-11)

Children's race, not disability status, may predict more frequent suspension
Suspension is one way schools discipline students, but the high number of and disparities in suspensions in the U.S. has sparked controversy and policy debate. (2019-01-30)

Yale psychologists find that adults take girls' pain less seriously
Gender stereotypes can hurt children -- quite literally. When asked to assess how much pain a child is experiencing based on the observation of identical reactions to a finger-stick, American adults believe boys to be in more pain than girls, according to a new Yale study in the Journal of Pediatric Psychology. (2019-01-25)

How kindergartens serve as 'gendergartens'
Sociologists at the Higher School of Economics showed that preschool education has its own hidden curriculum: kindergarten teachers transmit social norms to children, including conservative ideas of femininity and masculinity. Girls are expected to have 'proper' character and behavior, to be obedient and pretty, take an interest in music and dance, and to like the color pink. (2018-12-21)

Kindergarten difficulties may predict academic achievement across primary grades
Identifying factors that predict academic difficulties during elementary school should help inform efforts to help children who may be at risk. New Penn State research suggests that children's executive functions may be a particularly important risk factor for such difficulties. (2018-11-19)

SDSU-led team developing instruments to detect language problems earlier
Using the Computerized Comprehension Task, the team measured concepts by asking children to touch images on a touch-sensitive screen that represented words they were learning. The team used a measure of vocabulary that focused on stable concepts, finding that it was superior to prior measures in predicting children's general language ability at age 3. The team also identified individual children at risk for language problems a full two years earlier than prior studies. (2018-11-12)

Universities begin redesigning principal preparation programs
One year into a four-year $49 million initiative to improve training for aspiring school principals, a new RAND Corporation report found that seven universities are beginning to change their principal preparation programs to better reflect the real-world demands of the job. (2018-10-30)

Study finds elementary school student support leads to lower high school dropout
Elementary-school students who participated in a comprehensive support intervention in the Boston public school district had about half the odds of dropping out of high school as students not in the intervention, according to a new study published online today in AERA Open, a peer-reviewed journal published by the American Educational Research Association. (2018-10-03)

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