Current Knowledge News and Events

Current Knowledge News and Events, Knowledge News Articles.
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Divergences between scientific and Indigenous and Local Knowledge can be helpful
Divergences between scientific and Indigenous and Local Knowledge can provide a better understanding of why local pastoralists may be willing, or not, to participate in conservation initiatives for carnivores, a study from University of Helsinki suggests. (2021-01-15)

Indigenous knowledge still undervalued - study
New research has found that Indigenous knowledge is regularly underutilised and misunderstood when making important environmental decisions. (2020-09-03)

Large-scale COVID-19 vaccine production will require knowledge transfer on manufacturing
Massive, rapid production of vaccines to fight COVID-19 will require firms to share know-how not just about what to make, but how to make it, write Nicholson Price and colleagues in this Policy Forum. (2020-08-13)

Sensory information underpins abstract knowledge
What we learn through our senses drives how knowledge is sorted in our brains, according to research recently published in JNeurosci. (2020-03-09)

New studies explore how knowledge drives action in climate change decision-making
In several new studies, University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science researcher Katharine Mach and colleagues explore the importance of learning and knowledge in environmental decision-making and the different ways in which scientific knowledge can become more relevant and useful for societies. (2020-02-20)

Clear goals but murky path to ecosystem sustainability: Key knowledge gaps identified
International sustainability policies set out clear goals for protecting ecosystems and biodiversity, but how to actually achieve these goals remains elusive in practice, as biodiversity loss continues at an alarming rate. A new study published in the journal Nature Sustainability by an international team of 32 scientists identifies key knowledge gaps that need to be answered to tackle the root causes of biodiversity loss, and calls for more relevant, solutions-focused research that can address the social-ecological crisis. (2019-10-28)

Pro-science vs anti-science debates
Recent attacks on 'grievance' studies have occasioned renewed attention to the politics of knowledge in the academy. In a wide-ranging survey, Mark Horowitz, William Yaworsky and Kenneth Kickham revisit some of anthropology's most sensitive controversies. Taking the field's temperature since the sweltry 'science wars' of the nineties, Horowitz and colleagues probe whether anthropology is still a house divided on questions of truth, justice and the American Anthropological Association. (2019-10-15)

How do children express their state of knowledge of the world around them?
A study published in Journal of Language, Learning and Development by researchers with the Prosodic Studies Group led by Pilar Prieto, ICREA research professor with the Department of Translation and Language Sciences, reveals for the first time that three-year-olds use gestural and prosodic precursors in the expression of uncertainty, which they will express after five years of age through lexical cues. (2019-10-09)

New test to snare those lying about a person's identity
A new test developed by the University of Stirling could help police to determine when criminals or witnesses are lying about their knowledge of a person's identity. (2019-08-07)

What the brains of people with excellent general knowledge look like
The brains of people with excellent general knowledge are particularly efficiently wired. This was shown by neuroscientists at Ruhr-Universität Bochum and Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin using magnetic resonance imaging. (2019-07-31)

Over-claiming knowledge predicts anti-establishment voting
People who think they know more than they actually do are more likely to vote against the establishment, shows new research out of the Netherlands. (2019-07-18)

The quiet loss of knowledge threatens indigenous communities
Most of the knowledge that indigenous communities in South America have about plants is not written down. Now, ecologists at the University of Zurich have analyzed comprehensive information about the services provided by palm trees from multiple regions and made it accessible via a network approach. What they also discovered in the process was that the simultaneous loss of biodiversity and knowledge represents a key threat to the survival of indigenous peoples. (2019-05-02)

Measurement of thoughts during knowledge acquisition
How does the brain represent our knowledge of the world? Does it have a kind of map, similar to our sense of direction? And if so, how is it organized? Stephanie Theves and Christian F. Doeller have come one step closer to demonstrating the existence of such a mental navigation system. (2019-03-25)

Could theatre be way forward in communicating conservation messages?
Theatre performances in zoos can be effective in increasing knowledge of important conservation messages, a study at the University of York has revealed. (2019-02-07)

Distinguishing between students who guess and those who know
Measuring the knowledge of students in online courses poses a number of challenges. Researchers from the Higher School of Economics and the University of Leuven made improvements to the model for assessing academic achievements and published their results in the journal Heliyon. (2018-12-27)

Major gaps remain in how traditional knowledge is used in salmon governance in Norway and Finland
A new article published today in the journal Arctic points to major challenges in the ways traditional knowledge is included in the management of Atlantic salmon in Norway and Finland. (2018-12-20)

New deep knowledge AI system could resolve bottlenecks in drug research
Researchers at the University of Waterloo have developed a new system that could significantly speed up the discovery of new drugs and reduce the need for costly and time-consuming laboratory tests. (2018-11-06)

Pushing big data to rapidly advance patient care
The breakneck pace of biomedical discovery is outstripping clinicians' ability to incorporate this new knowledge into practice. Charles Friedman, Ph.D. and his colleagues recently wrote an article in the Journal of General Internal Medicine about a possible way to approach this problem, one that will accelerate the movement of newly-generated evidence about the management of health and disease into practice that improves the health of patients. (2018-08-30)

Can manipulating gut microbes improve cardiac function in patients with heart failure?
A clinical study called the GutHeart Trial is poised to examine the potential relationship between the bacterial composition of the gut and inflammatory and metabolic pathways in the cardiovascular system (2018-08-08)

Influence of technology acquisition on organizational performance studied in Iran
80 international companies from Iran were selected, and 320 respondents in key managerial positions were questioned. As the researchers found out, acquisition and use of technological innovations is a positive influence on organizational efficiency. (2018-05-08)

Superiority complex? People who claim superior beliefs exaggerate their own knowledge
No one likes smug know- it-all friends, relatives or co-workers who believe their knowledge and beliefs are superior to others. (2018-04-12)

Teachers, pedagogical skills, and the obstacle of intuition
When a task calls for intuitive, its complexity goes unnoticed. However, when intuitions are not mobilized, the task is considered difficult, and seemingly requires the use of specific educational strategies. Researchers at UNIGE have demonstrated that teachers struggle to understand the difficulties encountered by pupils when attempting to solve apparently intuitive problems that are in fact difficult. The findings suggest that teachers only use their pedagogical skills when a problem seems to mobilize counter-intuitive strategies. (2018-03-06)

Study: Retaining talent is paramount for successful firm acquisitions
A recent UT Dallas study found that when acquiring firms avoid the exodus of scientists from the target firms, their likelihood of creating highly impactful knowledge increases. (2018-03-05)

Insights from putting science under the microscope
Theories, data and knowledge continue to accumulate and become refined across many scientific fields -- but what do we know about science itself? In this Review, Santo Fortunato et al. highlight efforts to understand the 'science of science,' insights from which could be used to optimize the pursuit of knowledge and better society. (2018-03-01)

Increased scientific rigor will improve wildlife research and management
Wildlife management relies on rigorous science that produces reliable knowledge because it increases accurate understanding of the natural world and informs management decisions. (2018-01-18)

US companies are investing less in science
A new article reveals that large corporations are investing less in science. From 1980 to 2006, publications by company scientists have declined in a range of industries. The result holds across a range of industries. (2017-11-27)

Teacher-to-student knowledge transfer studied in joint Russia-Us effort
The field of studies is essential for both the scientific research and teacher education. Current cross-cultural research examines and compares teacher's influence on students' academic attainments in Russia and the USA. That allows to trace the peculiarities of education processes in the two countries and to have a multi-faceted comprehensive view on the matter. (2017-11-09)

Combining genomics with farmers' traditional knowledge to improve wheat production
Producing better crops to meet the needs of the growing world's population may lie in combining the traditional knowledge of subsistence farmers with plant genomics. Researchers in Italy and Ethiopia demonstrated that the indigenous knowledge of traditional farmers, passed on from one generation to generation, can be measured in a quantitative way and used with advanced genomic and statistical methods to identify genes responsible for farmers' preference of wheat. (2017-07-17)

Critical gaps in our knowledge of where infectious diseases occur
Today Scientists have called for action. The scientific journal Nature Ecology & Evolution have published a joint statement from scientists at Center for Macroecology, Evolution and Climate, University of Copenhagen and North Carolina State University. The scientists call attention to a serious lack of data on the worldwide distribution of disease-causing organisms. Without this knowledge, predicting where and when the next disease outbreak will emerge is hardly possible. Macroecologists hold the expertise to create the needed data network and close the knowledge gaps. (2017-06-22)

Disaster risk management: Science helps save lives
Natural and man-made disasters threaten millions of people every year and cause billions of property damage. How much do we know about them? And how can we use that knowledge to save lives and money? A recent report, compiled by the European Commission's Science and Knowledge Service (JRC), seeks to answer these and other questions and to help prepare for the time when disaster strikes. (2017-05-24)

Training program may improve police officers' ability to help older adults
After participating in a training program in aging-related health, police officers anticipated having more empathy for and awareness of aging-related conditions, and greater ability to provide older adults with appropriate community referrals. (2017-05-03)

BMJ launches new platform to help researchers get published, discovered and cited
BMJ, one of the world's leading medical knowledge providers, is pleased to announce the launch of the Author Hub, a new platform to assist researchers in every field, at every stage of the publishing process. (2017-01-23)

Children's early math knowledge related to later achievement
A new longitudinal study conducted in Tennessee has found that low-income children's math knowledge in preschool was related to their later achievement -- but not all types of math knowledge were related equally. (2016-12-06)

BMJ Best Practice & BMJ Learning available to health workers in Paraná State, Brazil
BMJ, one of the world's leading healthcare knowledge providers, announced today that healthcare professionals in Paraná State will be able to access BMJ Best Practice and BMJ Learning in both English and Portuguese. (2016-12-06)

UT Austin psychology researchers map neurological process of learning, deciding
Scientists at The University of Texas at Austin can now map what happens neurologically when new information influences a person to change his or her mind, a finding that offers more insight into the mechanics of learning. (2016-11-02)

Scientists root for more cassava research to help meet greater demand for food
Global food demand is expected to grow by 110 percent over the next 30 to 35 years, and for many of the poorest people on the planet, particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa, cassava is the most important source of calories. Cassava is also important as a crop that is resistant to climate change, but it has not received the same amount of attention as other staple food crops. (2016-10-25)

Opinions on fracking linked to political persuasion, says new study
A person's opinion on fracking can be predicted by their political ideology, according to a new study co-conducted by Plymouth University. (2016-05-09)

Physicians' knowledge about FDA approval standards for 'breakthrough therapy'
In a study appearing in the April 12 issue of JAMA, Aaron S. Kesselheim, M.D., J.D., M.P.H., of Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, and colleagues surveyed internists and specialists to examine their knowledge about Food and Drug Administration approval standards and perceptions of the 'breakthrough therapy' designation. (2016-04-12)

European Energy Efficiency Platform launched
On April 5 the JRC presented the interactive and collaborative online European Energy Efficiency Platform. This platform is conceived to fill the gap opened by scattered data and fragmented knowledge resulting from a rapidly growing energy efficiency market. It is expected to be both a one-stop shop for information retrieval and a meeting point for experts to exchange data and reduce redundant activities. (2016-04-05)

Social media beneficial for sharing and building upon patient experiences, research shows
University of Leicester research suggests patients often seek medical knowledge from social media platforms rather than traditional medical sources. (2016-03-21)

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