Current Labor News and Events

Current Labor News and Events, Labor News Articles.
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Stress was leading reason teachers quit before pandemic, and COVID has made matters worse
Stress was the most common reason teachers cited for leaving the profession before and during the pandemic, according to a RAND Corporation survey of nearly 1,000 former public-school teachers. Three of four former teachers said work was often or always stressful in the most recent year in which they taught in a public school. Teachers cited stress nearly twice as often as insufficient pay as a reason for quitting. (2021-02-22)

How a gene called HAND2 may impact the timing of labor
Using new and existing datasets the team studied genes that were active in the uterine linings of different animals while pregnant or carrying eggs. Scientists also investigated the changing levels of HAND2 during gestation. (2021-02-22)

Paper: STEM skills gap modest among IT help desk workers
The incidence of prolonged hiring difficulties for workers with science and technology backgrounds is consistent with persistent hiring frictions and not a 'skills gap' in the labor market for information technology help desk workers, one of the largest computer occupations in the US, says new research by U. of I. labor professor Andrew Weaver. (2021-02-18)

New test provides fast and accurate diagnosis of liposarcomas
Researchers have leveraged the latest advances in RNA technology and machine learning methods to develop a gene panel test that allows for highly accurate diagnosis of the most common types of liposarcoma. It quickly and reliably distinguishes benign lipomas from liposarcomas and can be performed in laboratories at a lower cost than current 'gold standard' tests. The new assay is described in The Journal of Molecular Diagnosis, published by Elsevier. (2021-02-04)

Generous parental leave leads to staff shortages, nursing home deaths
A new paper in the Review of Economic Studies finds that a generous parental leave policy nurses enjoyed in Denmark caused nursing shortages, which resulted in a decline in the quality of hospital and nursing home care. The study estimates a large increase in nursing home mortality. (2021-01-28)

Entrepreneurs benefit more from emotional intelligence than other competencies, such as IQ
Running a successful business has its challenges, but the COVID-19 pandemic has required many owners to pivot and look for new ways to operate profitably while keeping employees and consumers safe. Research from the Indiana University Kelley School of Business found that emotional intelligence - the ability to understand, use and manage emotions to relieve stress - may be more vital to a business' survival than previously thought. (2021-01-28)

UTMB team proves potential for reducing pre-term birth by treating fetus as patient
The results of a study by researchers at the University of Texas Medical Branch may pave the way for a new medicine delivery system that could reduce the incidence of pre-term labor and premature birth by allowing physicians to treat the 'fetus as the patient'. The study has been published in Science Advances. (2021-01-22)

Nanotechnology prevents premature birth in mouse studies
In a study in mice and human cells, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say that they have developed a tiny, yet effective method for preventing premature birth. (2021-01-13)

Study of flowers with two types of anthers solves mystery that baffled Darwin
Most flowering plants depend on pollinators such as bees to transfer pollen from the male anthers of one flower to the female stigma of another flower, enabling fertilization and the production of fruits and seeds. Bee pollination, however, involves an inherent conflict of interest, because bees are only interested in pollen as a food source. A new study describes a pollination strategy involving flowers with two distinct sets of anthers that differ in color, size, and position. (2021-01-12)

For moms, oxygen during childbirth often unnecessary
A comprehensive analysis - led by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis - has found no benefit in providing supplemental oxygen to mothers during labor and delivery, a decades-long and common practice. Infants born to women who received supplemental oxygen fared no better or no worse than those born to women who had similar labor experiences but breathed room air. (2021-01-04)

Financial woes grow worse during pandemic for American families
Many Americans have lost their jobs or are working less because of the shutdowns caused by the coronavirus pandemic. A survey that has been tracking a representative sample of Americans over the course of the pandemic finds that the financial struggles of many families are growing worse. (2020-12-17)

Remote learning here to stay despite challenges, survey finds
About two in 10 U.S. school districts have already adopted, plan to adopt or are considering adopting virtual schools after the end of the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a new RAND Corporation study. The survey of district leaders indicates that virtual schooling was the innovative practice that most district leaders anticipated would continue, citing both student and parent demand for continuing various forms of online instruction. (2020-12-15)

Majority of pregnant women who tested positive for COVID-19 were asymptomatic, study finds
Illustrates how pandemic disproportionally impacted vulnerable populations and underserved communities (2020-12-11)

Mass incarceration results in significant increases in industrial emissions, study finds
Mass incarceration is as much an environmental problem as it is a social one, according to a new Portland State University study that finds increases in incarceration are significantly associated with increases in industrial emissions. (2020-12-04)

Hiring foreign nurses does not hurt US nursing jobs, study shows
An aging US population is rapidly increasing the demand for nursing care. The COVID-19 pandemic has further exacerbated the need for health care professionals. One strategy to meet rising health care needs is to hire foreign nurses to fill the gaps. Opponents of immigration have asserted that the influx of foreign nurses has resulted in unemployment and lower wages for domestic nurses. However, a new study from the University of Illinois found no displacement effects. (2020-12-03)

Unmet job expectations linked to a rise in suicide, deaths of despair
The study, published in JAMA Network Open, is the first to link the rise in suicide and drug-poisoning deaths among men without a college degree to declines in working-class jobs. (2020-12-02)

Football-loving states slow to enact youth concussion laws
States with college teams in strong conferences, in particular the Southeastern Conference (SEC), were among the last to take up regulations on youth concussions, according to a recent study. The study, which investigated the association between youth sport participation and passage of concussion legislation, also found a similar connection in states with high rates of high school football participation. In contrast, states with higher gender equality were early adopters. (2020-12-01)

Bridges between villages in Nicaragua serve as links to markets
Yale Economic Growth Center researcher Kevin Donovan and coauthor find that building footbridges positively affects rural economies in flood-prone areas. (2020-11-30)

Learning a new language changes the brain's division of labor
Learning a language later in life changes how the two halves of the brain contribute. As skills improve, language comprehension changes hemisphere specialization, but production does not, according to new research published in JNeurosci. (2020-11-17)

How religion can hamper economic progress
Study from Bocconi University on impact of antiscientific curricula of Catholic schools on accumulation of human capital in France during the 2nd Industrial Revolution could hold lessons on impact of religion on technological progress today. (2020-11-13)

Study: Remote learning adds pressure for teachers who work second shift as mothers
The transition to remote learning coupled with an unequal distribution of second-shift responsibilities has placed teachers who are also mothers under immense stress, according to new University at Buffalo research. (2020-11-09)

Early big-game hunters of the americas were female, researchers suggest
For centuries, historians and scientists mostly agreed that when early human groups sought food, men hunted and women gathered. Not so, say researchers. (2020-11-04)

Married, single, kids or not, participating in workforce may protect women's memory
Women who work in the paid labor force in early adulthood and middle age may have slower memory decline later in life than women who do not work for pay, according to a new study published in the November 4, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2020-11-04)

A loan for lean season
For farmers in rural Zambia, payday comes just once a year, at harvest time. This fact impacts nearly every aspect of their lives, but until now researchers hadn't realized the true extent. (2020-11-02)

COVID-19 control measures shorten hospital stays for moms, babies
A new study from Cedars-Sinai shows new infection prevention practices implemented during the coronavirus pandemic have resulted in significantly shorter hospital stays for mothers and their babies, with no changes in the rates of cesarean deliveries, complications or poor outcomes. (2020-11-02)

Consistent nursing care after childbirth boosts breastfeeding rates
New parents who receive attentive, supportive nursing care during labor and immediately after childbirth are more likely to exclusively breastfeed their newborn when leaving the hospital, finds a study published in MCN: The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. (2020-10-15)

Major US hospital-based study shows waterbirths as safe as traditional births
A new US study of waterbirths found that hospital-based births involving water immersion had no higher risk of neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) or special care nursery admission than comparable deliveries in the control group without water immersion. (2020-10-14)

Labor epidurals do not cause autism; Safe for mothers and infants, say anesthesiology, obstetrics
Five medical societies aim to clearly reassure pregnant women that the article ''Association Between Epidural Analgesia During Labor and Risk of Autism Spectrum Disorders in Offspring,'' a new retrospective database study published in JAMA Pediatrics on October 12th, 2020 does not provide credible scientific evidence that labor epidurals for pain relief cause autism. (2020-10-12)

Men less likely to see food as national security issue amid pandemic
On average, men not only showed less empathy toward temporary agricultural laborers but also were less likely to see food supply and production as national security issues, according to a study led by a Washington State University researcher. (2020-10-08)

Lack of support prolongs unemployment
Unemployed persons whose appointment with the responsible caseworker at the employment office is canceled unexpectedly remain unemployed for an average of twelve days longer. This is what Bonn economist Amelie Schiprowski established in a study by the Cluster of Excellence ECONtribute: Markets & Public Policy at the Universities of Cologne and Bonn (Germany). (2020-10-08)

Scientists are more specialized in larger and interdisciplinary teams
The roles of scientists change as research teams become more interdisciplinary and larger, finds new research from ESMT Berlin. Henry Sauermann, Professor of Strategy at ESMT Berlin, and Prof. Carolin Haeussler from the University of Passau found that division of labor increased with the size of the team, meaning a higher proportion of team members specialized in fewer tasks, sometimes only contributing to one activity. However, generalist members, which are less specialized and contribute to multiple activities, did not disappear completely. (2020-10-07)

Women, workers of color filling most 'high-hazard/low-reward' jobs in Washington
When exploring data on Washington workers during the pandemic -- demographics, working conditions, wages and benefits, and risks of exposure to disease -- the authors of a new report found that women hold two-thirds of the jobs in the harshest category of work. (2020-10-05)

Momentum of unprecedented Chilean uprising stalled by COVID-19 pandemic
The uprising that erupted in fall 2019 in Chile against the post-dictatorship government may be diminished by the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, according to faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York. (2020-09-17)

A new method may make tomatoes safer to eat
When vegetable farmers harvest crops, they often rely on postharvest washing to reduce any foodborne pathogens, but a new University of Georgia study shows promise in reducing these pathogens - as well as lowering labor costs-- by applying sanitizers to produce while it is still in the fields. (2020-09-08)

Technology can help speed soil recovery after oil spills
Researchers use spectroscopy to quickly and cheaply analyze soils samples. (2020-08-12)

Paper: Industry concentration contributes to job quality erosion, wage stagnation
Dominant firms in concentrated industries can play a role in job quality erosion and wage stagnation for U.S. workers, says new research co-written by U. of I. labor and employment relations professor Richard Benton and U. of I. graduate student Ki-Jung Kim. (2020-08-12)

Researchers say where you live could add years to your life
Could where you live dictate how long you live? New research at Syracuse University's Maxwell School, published today in the Milbank Quarterly, shows Americans who live in so-called blue states tend to live longer than those in red states, primarily due to state policies. (2020-08-04)

How global responses to COVID-19 threaten global food security
The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has forced nations worldwide to implement unprecedented social measures to stem the rapid spread of the virus. (2020-07-30)

Blueprint of oxytocin receptor facilitates development of new autism drugs
Oxytocin plays a role in various mental health and sexual reproduction disorders. Researchers at the University of Zurich have now determined the three-dimensional structure of the oxytocin receptor to which the hormone binds. This knowledge could promote the development of novel drugs to treat a variety of diseases. (2020-07-15)

Mothers' paid work suffers during pandemic, study finds
New research from Washington University in St. Louis finds early evidence that the pandemic has exacerbated -- not improved -- the gender gap in work hours, which could have enduring consequences for working mothers. (2020-07-13)

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