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Current Landscape News and Events, Landscape News Articles.
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Future climate changes in nature reserves
The Earth's nature reserves are set to be affected by future climate change in very different ways. Detailed local knowledge of climate change impacts can therefore make a significant contribution to the management of protected areas and the preservation of their ecological function. A study by the University of Bayreuth in the journal 'Diversity and Distributions' draws attention to this fact. It is based on climate forecasts for more than 130,000 nature reserves worldwide. (2020-10-02)

UBCO researchers concerned about prey and predator species in post-fire logging areas
New research from UBC Okanagan shows that salvage logging on land damaged by wildfires has negative impacts on a variety of animals. While post-fire salvage logging is used to mitigate economic losses following wildfire, Karen Hodges, a biology professor in the Irving K. Barber Faculty of Science, says the compounded effects of wildfire and post-fire salvage logging are more severe than what wildlife experience from fire alone. (2020-09-22)

Colorado's famous aspens expected to decline due to climate change
Using computer modeling, researchers simulated how the distribution of quaking aspen, a native tree known for its brilliant yellow and orange foliage in fall and the sound of its trembling leaves, will change amid rising temperatures over the next 100 years. (2020-09-16)

NASA's Terra Satellite shows smoky pall over most of California
More than 650 wildfires are blazing in California after unprecedented lightning strikes, storms, and a heatwave that has set new records in the state and NASA's Terra satellite captured the smoke-engulfed state on Aug. 24, 2020. (2020-08-24)

Fossil pollen record suggests vulnerability to mass extinction ahead
Reduced resilience of plant biomes in North America could be setting the stage for the kind of mass extinctions not seen since the retreat of glaciers and arrival of humans about 13,000 years ago, cautions a new study published August 20 in the journal Global Change Biology. (2020-08-23)

Insect diversity boosted by combination of crop diversity and semi-natural habitats
To enhance the number of beneficial insect species in agricultural land, preserving semi-natural habitats and promoting crop diversity are both needed, according to new research published in the British Ecological Society's Journal of Applied of Ecology. (2020-08-13)

Mathematical patterns developed by Alan Turing help researchers understand bird behavior
Scientists from the University of Sheffield have used mathematical modelling to understand why flocks of long-tailed tits segregate themselves into different parts of the landscape. (2020-08-11)

Fragmented forests: Tree cover, urban sprawl both increased in Southeast Michigan over the past 30 years
The extent of Southeast Michigan's tree canopy and its urban sprawl both increased between 1985 and 2015, according to a new University of Michigan study that used aerial photos and satellite images to map individual buildings and small patches of street trees. (2020-08-10)

Model links patterns in sediment to rain, uplift and sea level change
In a recent study, researchers from The University of Texas at Austin show that a natural record - sediments packed together at basin margins - offers scientists a powerful tool for understanding the forces that shaped our planet over millions of years, with implications on present day understanding. (2020-07-27)

Geoscientists glean data suggesting global climate changes increase river erosion rates
Using cosmogenic nuclide burial dating methods and optically stimulated luminescence dating, geoscientists establish ages for river deposits from the Yukon River basin that span key time periods of global climate change. (2020-07-20)

If it's big enough and leafy enough the birds will come
A new study from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology highlights specific features of urban green spaces that support the greatest diversity of bird species. The findings were published today in the journal Landscape and Urban Planning. The study focuses specifically on parks in New York City. It uses observations submitted to the eBird citizen-science database from 2002 through 2019 to estimate the variety of species found on an annual and seasonal basis. (2020-07-20)

Where is the water during a drought?
In low precipitation periods - where and how is the limited available water distributed and what possibilities are there for improving retention in the soil and the landscape? Doerthe Tetzlaff and her team from the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries discovered that vegetation has a major influence on this. Using the example of the drought-sensitive Demnitzer Muehlenfliess in Brandenburg, they quantified visible and invisible water flows during and shortly after the drought of 2018. (2020-07-17)

New map for radioactive soil contamination in Western Europe
An international consortium of scientists has refined the map of caesium and plutonium radionuclide concentrations in soils in Switzerland and several neighbouring countries. Using an archive of European soil samples, the team led by Katrin Meusburger from the University of Basel, now at the WSL research institute, was able to trace the sources of radioactive fallout between 1960 and 2009. This study was published in Scientific Reports. (2020-07-16)

Dehydration increases amphibian vulnerability to climate change
Amphibians have few options to avoid the underappreciated one-two punch of climate change, according to a new study from Simon Fraser University researchers and others. Rising summer temperatures are also resulting in higher rates of dehydration among wet-skinned amphibians as they attempt to keep themselves cool. (2020-07-15)

Scientists reveal comprehensive proteomic map of human lung adenocarcinoma
A team of Chinese scientists from Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, National Center for Protein Sciences (Beijing), National Cancer Center/Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, and Shanghai Jiao Tong University, recently reported a comprehensive proteomic analysis based on 103 Chinese patients with lung adenocarcinoma (LUAD), a leading cause of death among all types of cancer worldwide. (2020-07-09)

Milking algae mechanically: Progress to succeed petroleum derived chemicals
A method to extract carbohydrates and phycobiliproteins from algae was developed that does not kill the algae during harvest or rely on solvents for extraction and purification. This novel method uses mechanical shearing to 'milk' the desired compounds, greatly reducing the production cost of algae-derived compounds. (2020-07-08)

Wild bees depend on the landscape structure
Sowing strips of wildflowers along conventional cereal fields and the increased density of flowers in organic farming encourage bumblebees as well as solitary wild bees and hoverflies. Bumblebee colonies benefit from flower strips along small fields, but in organic farming, they benefit from large fields. This research was carried out by agroecologists from the University of Göttingen in a comparison of different farming systems and landscape types. The results of the study have been published in the Journal of Applied Ecology. (2020-06-30)

Airborne mapping sheds light on climate sensitivity of California redwoods
To better understand redwood habitat suitability, a team of researchers from the University of Texas, Arizona State University, University of Miami, and Stanford University combined high-resolution redwood distribution maps with data on moisture availability to identify the environmental factors that shape redwood distribution (2020-06-23)

Virtual demolition
Scientists at Osaka University show how buildings and moving objects can be virtually removed from real-time images in a process of ''diminished reality.'' This work can be beneficial for urban and campus planners. (2020-06-17)

Study reveals impacts of climate change on migrating mule deer
The benefits of migration are likely to decrease for mule deer and other migratory herbivores as drought becomes more common due to ongoing climate change. (2020-06-12)

Beavers are diverse forest landscapers
Beavers are ecosystem engineers that cut down trees to build dams, eventually causing floods. Beaver-induced floods make forest landscapes and habitats increasingly diverse, but very little is known about the long-term effects of beavers on European landscapes. Researchers at the University of Eastern Finland and the University of Helsinki examined the history and occurrence of beaver-induced floods and patch dynamics in southern Finland. They used a unique dataset of field observations from 1970 to 2018. (2020-06-10)

Bedrock type under forests greatly affects tree growth, species, carbon storage
A forest's ability to store carbon depends significantly on the bedrock beneath, according to Penn State researchers who studied forest productivity, composition and associated physical characteristics of rocks in the Appalachian ridge and Valley Region of Pennsylvania. (2020-06-10)

Viewing the topology of thermonuclear reaction in nuclear landscape from the network perspective
Nucleosynthesis is a complicated process in astrophysics. By constructing a directed, un-weighted, multilayer nuclear reaction network, which consisted of all nuclides and reactions within the JINA REACLIB database, researchers in Shanghai have investigated important topological features as well as identified the most frequent reaction patterns of the interconnections that occurred amongst the different nuclides in nuclear landscape, i.e. motif structures of nuclear reactions. (2020-06-08)

Patterns in permafrost soils could help climate change models
A team of scientists spent the past four summers measuring permafrost soils across a 5,000 square-mile swath of Alaska's North Slope. While working to buildup a much-needed soil dataset, their measurements revealed an important pattern: The hydrologic properties of different permafrost soil types are very consistent, and can be predicted based on the surrounding landscape. (2020-06-08)

Caves tell us that Australia's mountains are still growing
Research shows Buchan Caves to be about 3.5 million years old and that Victoria's East Gippsland has remained tectonically active for long times, even into the present-day, which is why residents occasionally report earthquakes. Basically, the uplifting Southern Alps in New Zealand have made stress and strain on the Australian tectonic plate, stress that is then expressed as earthquakes and rising landscapes in Victoria. It's rather amazing that the caves recorded this geological signal all the way from NZ. (2020-05-20)

Genetic tradeoffs do not stop evolution of antibiotic resistance
Bacteria can still develop antibiotic resistance even in the face of challenging genetic tradeoffs, or compromises, associated with varying antibiotic concentrations, says a new study published today in eLife. (2020-05-19)

Study examines impact of Chicago River reversal on region's aquatic environments, fauna
In a paper published in the journal Urban Ecosystems, University of Illinois at Chicago students from the departments of earth and environmental sciences and biological sciences have measured both the extent of wetland loss in Cook County since the time of the river reversal and the alterations in the animal populations. (2020-05-18)

Early humans thrived in this drowned South African landscape
An interdisciplinary, international team of scientists has reconstructed the paleoecology the Paleo-Agulhas Plain, a now-drowned landscape on the southern tip of Africa that was high and dry during glacial phases of the last 2 million years and may have been instrumental in shaping the evolution of early modern humans. (2020-05-15)

Cornell research traces how farmlands affect bee disease spread
A new Cornell University study on bees, plants and landscapes in upstate New York sheds light on how bee pathogens spread, offering possible clues for what farmers could do to improve bee health. (2020-05-14)

Saving livestock by thinking like a predator
Humans have struggled to reduce the loss of livestock to carnivores for thousands of years, and yet, solutions remain elusive. According to a new study led by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, solving this ancient puzzle requires going back to Ecology 101. Simply put, getting in the mind of predators -- considering how they hunt, how their prey behaves and the landscape -- will help wildlife managers discourage wild carnivores from preying on valuable livestock. (2020-05-14)

Water loss in northern peatlands threatens to intensify fires, global warming
A group of 59 international scientists, led by researchers at Canada's McMaster University, has uncovered new information about the distinct effects of climate change on boreal forests and peatlands, which threaten to worsen wildfires and accelerate global warming. (2020-05-11)

Computational techniques explore 'the dark side of amyloid aggregation in the brain'
As physicians and families know too well, though Alzheimer's disease has been intensely studied for decades, too much is still not known about molecular processes in the brain that cause it. Now researchers at the University of Massachusetts Amherst say new insights from analytic theory and molecular simulation techniques offer a better understanding of amyloid fibril growth and brain pathology. (2020-04-29)

Dramatic loss of food plants for insects
Just a few weeks ago, everyone was talking about plummeting insect numbers. A team of researchers from the Universities of Bonn and Zurich and the Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research WSL have now demonstrated for the first time that the diversity of food plants for insects in the canton of Zurich has dramatically decreased over the past 100 years or so. The study has now been published in 'Ecological Applications'. (2020-04-24)

Identifying land cover from outer space
Having detailed land cover information is important for a better understanding of our environment. This information is increasingly obtained from satellite images with high temporal and spatial resolution. However, clouds often prevent the view from space to the earth's surface. The dynamic use of machine learning models can take this local cloud cover into account. The algorithm recognises 19 different types of crops, accurate to 88 percent. (2020-04-20)

Ash dieback is less severe in isolated ash trees
New research published in the British Ecological Society's Journal of Ecology finds that ash dieback is far less severe in the isolated conditions ash is often found in, such as forests with low ash density or in open canopies like hedges, suggesting the long term impact of the disease on Europe's ash trees will be more limited than previously thought. (2020-04-16)

Earth Day alert to save our frogs
With climate action a theme of Earth Day 2020 (April 22, 2020), a new research paper highlights the plight of some of the most at-risk amphibian species - and shortfalls in most conservation efforts. More than birds and most mammals, amphibians (frogs, salamander, worm-like caecilians, anurans, etc) are on the front line of extinction in a hotter, dryer climate conditions. (2020-04-16)

Earliest humans in the Amazon created thousands of 'forest islands' as they tamed wild plants
The earliest human inhabitants of the Amazon created thousands of artificial forest islands as they tamed wild plants to grow food, a new study shows. (2020-04-08)

Stanford researchers show how forest loss leads to spread of disease
In Uganda, loss of forested habitat increases the likelihood of interactions between disease-carrying wild primates and humans. The findings suggest the emergence and spread of viruses, such as the one that causes COVID-19, will become more common as the conversion of natural habitats into farmland continues worldwide. (2020-04-07)

The four horsemen of the COVID-19 pandemic
It is clear that we must prioritize identifying and alleviating the conditions that made the Covid-19 pandemic possible. Even as it rages, scientists are already asking if it is more than just a virus, but rather a symptom emerging from something much deeper, a nonlinear dynamical system of coupled pathologies underlying a veneer of 'progress' in an increasingly fragile, volatile, hyperconnected world. (2020-04-06)

Vermont has conserved one third of the land needed for an ecologically functional future
In a new study, forest conservation experts at the University of Vermont (UVM) confirmed that the state has already protected 33%, or 1.3 million acres, of highest priority targeted lands needed to protect and connect valuable wildlife habitats and corridors. (2020-04-01)

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