Current Landslide News and Events

Current Landslide News and Events, Landslide News Articles.
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In predicting shallow but dangerous landslides, size matters
Scientific understanding of landslides has improved immensely in the last few decades, but models that predict which areas could slide during specific storm events overpredict, forcing government agencies to evacuate unnecessarily large areas. UC Berkeley geoscientists have created improved models that more narrowly pinpoint the most hazardous areas, but they've run up against a wall: they need data about what lies between the soil surface and bedrock, something current techniques like LiDAR cannot adequately provide. (2021-02-15)

Retreating glacier presents landslide threat, tsunami risk in Alaskan fjord
Using NASA satellite imagery and software processing approaches, a group of geoscientists has discovered a landslide-generated tsunami threat in Barry Arm, Alaska, that will likely affect tourists and locals in the surrounding area in the next 20 years. (2020-11-13)

Landslide along Alaskan fjord could trigger tsunami
Scientists noted that the slope on Barry Arm fjord on Prince William Sound in southeastern Alaska slid some 120 meters from 2010 to 2017, a slow-moving landslide caused by glacial melt that could trigger a devastating tsunami. These are some of the first measurements to quantify how the slope is falling there; the study also models a potential tsunami. (2020-11-12)

Post-wildfire hazards: Toward an understanding of when & how slope failure may occur
Across the western US, severe wildfires fueled by tinder-dry vegetation have already burned more than 3.2 million hectares (8 million acres [as of the time of this press release]) -- an area the size of Maryland -- in 2020, and nearly six times that area burned this year in Australia. And even though neither country's worst-ever fire year is not yet over, concerns are already mounting regarding the next hazard these regions will face: dangerous and destructive debris flows. (2020-10-27)

Simple actions can help people survive landslides
Simple actions can dramatically improve a person's chances of surviving a landslide, according to records from 38 landslides in the US and around the world. People who survived landslides tended to show key behaviors such as being aware of the risk, moving to higher ground, and making noise if buried. (2020-10-22)

Scientists improve model of landslide-induced tsunami
MIPT researchers Leopold Lobkovsky and Raissa Mazova, and their young colleagues from Nizhny Novgorod State Technical University have created a model of landslide-induced tsunamis that accounts for the initial location of the landslide body. Reported in Landslides, the model reveals that tsunami height is affected by the coastal slope and the position of the land mass before slipping. The highest and most devastating waves result from onshore landslide masses. (2020-10-19)

Landslides have long-term effects on tundra vegetation
Landslides have long-term effects on tundra vegetation, a new study shows. Conducting the study in North West Siberia, the researchers found that tundra vegetation regenerated rapidly after a major landslide event in 1989. Two decades later, differences in the vegetation of the landslide area and the areas surrounding it have evened out, but even after 30 years, the vegetation of the landslide area is nowhere close to the vegetation of the surrounding areas. (2020-09-28)

Earthquake lightning: Mysterious luminescence phenomena
Photoemission induced by rock fracturing can occur as a result of landslides associated with earthquakes. Factors involved in such earthquake lightnings were studied with granite, rhyolite, pyroclastic rock and limestone. (2020-09-28)

Most landslides in western Oregon triggered by heavy rainfall, not big earthquakes
Deep-seated landslides in the central Oregon Coast Range are triggered mostly by rainfall, not by large offshore earthquakes. (2020-09-16)

Natural disasters must be unusual or deadly to prompt local climate policy change
Natural disasters alone are not enough to motivate local communities to engage in climate change mitigation or adaptation, a new study from Oregon State University found. Rather, policy change in response to extreme weather events appears to depend on a combination of factors, including fatalities, sustained media coverage, the unusualness of the event and the political makeup of the community. (2020-08-28)

New approach soft material flow may yield way to new materials, disaster prediction
How does toothpaste stay in its tube and not ooze out when we remove the cap? What causes seemingly solid ground to suddenly break free into a landslide? Defining exactly how soft materials flow and seize has eluded researchers for years, but a new study explains this complex motion using relatively simple experiments. The ability to define - and eventually predict - soft material flow will benefit people dealing with everything from spreadable cheese to avalanches. (2020-08-24)

Small quake clusters can't hide from AI
A deep learning algorithm developed at Rice University analyzes data from a deadly landslide in Greenland to show how it may someday predict seismic events like earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. (2020-08-24)

New research reveals how hurricane Lane brought fire and rain to Hawaiian islands
A recently published study, led by University of Hawai'i at Mānoa researchers, details the compounding hazards -- fire and rain -- produced by Hurricane Lane in August 2018. (2020-07-20)

Taking a landslide's temperature to avert catastrophe
Duke engineers have developed a comprehensive model of deep-seated landslides and demonstrated that it can accurately recreate the dynamics of historic and current landslides occurring under varying conditions. The model points to the temperature of a thin layer of clay at the base of the landslide as critical to the potential for sudden cataclysmic failure. The approach is currently monitoring a landslide in Andorra and suggests methods for mitigating the risk of its escalation. (2020-06-15)

ATLAS telescope discovers first-of-its-kind asteroid
University of Hawai'i telescope discovers extraordinary asteroid with comet-like features that has researchers puzzled. (2020-05-21)

South American volcano showing early warning signs of 'potential collapse', research shows
One of South America's most prominent volcanoes is producing early warning signals of a potential collapse, new research has shown. (2020-02-18)

Climate change could trigger more landslides in High Mountain Asia
More frequent and intense rainfall events due to climate change could cause more landslides in the High Mountain Asia region of China, Tibet and Nepal, according to the first quantitative study of the link between precipitation and landslides in the region. (2020-02-11)

Steep momentum gradients play a major role in coastal precipitation
Steep gradients of wind stress and potential temperature enable sustainable nearshore precipitation systems along the western coastal region of Korea. (2019-11-19)

Martian landslides not conclusive evidence of ice
Giant ridges on the surface of landslides on Mars could have formed without ice, challenging their use by some as unequivocal evidence of past ice on the red planet, finds a new UCL-led study using state-of-the-art satellite data. (2019-10-24)

Ground failure study shows deep landslides not reactivated by 2018 Anchorage Quake
Major landslides triggered by the 1964 magnitude 9.2 Great Alaska earthquake responded to, but were not reactivated by, the magnitude 7.1 Anchorage earthquake that took place 30 November 2018, researchers concluded in a new study published in Seismological Research Letters. (2019-10-23)

New GSA bulletin study of the 2014 Oso landslide
As a compelling example of a large-mobility landslide, the March 22, 2014 landslide near Oso, Washington, USA, was particularly devastating, traveling across a 1-km-plus-wide river valley, killing 43 people, destroying dozens of homes, and temporarily closing a well-traveled highway. (2019-06-26)

Precursors of a catastrophic collapse
The flanks of many island volcanoes slide very slowly towards the sea. Whether these landslides are forewarnings of a catastrophic collapse or, on the contrary, even reduce its risk, is not yet understood. Geophysicists from the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research in Kiel have now published a study in the journal Earth and Planetary Science Letters, which shows that sporadic, slow landslides on the small volcanic island of Ritter Island in New Guinea preceded a catastrophic collapse. (2019-05-16)

Quick reconnaissance after 2018 Anchorage quake reveals signs of ground failure
A day after the Nov. 30, 2018, magnitude 7 earthquake in Anchorage, Alaska, US Geological Survey scientists Robert Witter and Adrian Bender had taken to the skies. The researchers were surveying the region from a helicopter, looking for signs of ground failure from landslides to liquefaction. (2019-04-26)

Salish seafloor mapping identifies earthquake and tsunami risks
The central Salish Sea of the Pacific Northwest is bounded by two active fault zones that could trigger rockfalls and slumps of sediment that might lead to tsunamis, according to a presentation at the 2019 SSA Annual Meeting. (2019-04-24)

Minerals in mountain rivers tell the story of landslide activity upstream
Scientists have come up with a new way of analyzing sand in mountain rivers to determine the activity of landslides upstream, which has important implications for understanding natural hazards in mountainous regions. (2019-04-24)

More extreme coastal weather events likely to increase bluff erosion, landslide activity
Unstable slopes on Oregon's coastline could see a 30 percent jump in landslide movements if extreme storms become frequent enough to increase seacliff erosion by 10 percent, a new study by Oregon State University shows. (2019-02-26)

Landslides triggered by Hurricane Maria
Hurricane Maria hit the island of Puerto Rico on 20 September 2017 and triggered more than 40,000 landslides in at least three-fourths of Puerto Rico's 78 municipalities. In a new article from GSA Today, authors Erin Bessette-Kirton and colleagues write that 'the number of landslides that occurred during this event was two orders of magnitude greater than those reported from previous hurricanes.' (2019-02-07)

Nobody wins in a landslide
The University of Cincinnati is working with the Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology to add specific details on landslides to the state's map of known hazards. (2018-11-06)

NASA's GPM examines weaker Tropical Storm Yutu's rainfall
Typhoon Yutu produced heavy rainfall as it passed over the island of Luzon in the northern Philippines. The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite provided data on that rainfall. The storm has since weakened to a tropical storm and triggered warnings in China. (2018-11-01)

Regional seismic data help to locate September 2017 North Korean nuclear test
The epicenter of the Sept. 3, 2017, nuclear test explosion in North Korea occurred about 3.6 kilometers northwest of the country's first nuclear test in October 2006, according to a new high-precision analysis of the explosion and its aftermath. (2018-09-26)

NASA created rainfall analysis for super Typhoon Mangkhut
At NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. data was used to create a map of rainfall generated by Super Typhoon Mangkhut. (2018-09-20)

Landslides triggered by human activity on the rise
More than 50,000 people were killed by landslides around the world between 2004 and 2016, according to a new study by researchers at UK's Sheffield University. The team, who compiled data on over 4,800 fatal landslides during the 13-year period, also revealed for the first time that landslides resulting from human activity have increased over time. The research is published today in the European Geosciences Union journal Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences. (2018-08-23)

New research predicts landslide boundaries two weeks before they happen
University of Melbourne researchers have developed a software tool that uses applied mathematics and big data analytics to predict the boundary of where a landslide will occur, two weeks in advance. (2018-08-15)

IU researchers develop model for predicting landslides caused by earthquakes
A model developed by researchers at Indiana University can help experts estimate the likelihood of landslides that will be caused by earthquakes anywhere in the world. The estimates can be available within minutes. (2018-07-24)

Bees love blue fluorescent light, and not just any wavelength will do
Researchers have learned that a specific wavelength range of blue fluorescent light set bees abuzz. (2018-06-18)

Tiny microbes make a surprisingly big contribution to carbon release
As erosion eats away at Earth's surface, some types of rocks release carbon they contain back into the atmosphere -- and now a new study suggests that microbes play a substantial role in this release. (2018-04-12)

Sediment core from sluice pond contains evidence for 1755 New England earthquake
Signs of a 1755 earthquake that was strong enough to topple steeples and chimneys in Boston can be seen in a sediment core drawn from eastern Massachusetts' Sluice Pond, according to a new report published in Seismological Research Letters. (2018-03-27)

Landslide modeling after Kaikoura Quake provides data to first responders
Hours after the 2016 Kaikoura earthquake hit New Zealand, researchers were able to share information with first responders about where significant landsliding might have occurred to block roads and rivers, according to a new report in the Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America. (2018-03-26)

Why the seafloor starts moving
When the seabed loses its stability and starts to move, it often happens in much larger dimensions than landslides ashore -- and at slopes with very low gradients. At the same time, discplacement of large amounts of sediment under water scan cause devastating tsunamis. However, why and when submarine landslides develop is hardly understood. Marine scientists from GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel have now published possible causes based on observations on submarine landslides off the coast of northwest Africa in the international journal Geology. (2018-02-13)

NASA calculated heavy rainfall leading to California mudslides
Winter rains falling on recently burned ground triggered deadly mudslides in Santa Barbara County, California on Jan. 9. NASA calculated the amount of rain fall between Jan. 8 and 10, 2018 and calculated the potential for landslides. (2018-01-11)

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