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Current Landslides News and Events, Landslides News Articles.
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Global road-building explosion could be disastrous for people and nature, say scientists
Global Road-building Explosion Could Be Disastrous for People and Nature, say Scientists The global explosion of new roads is rife with economic, social, and environmental dangers, according to a study in Science led by Professor William Laurance from James Cook University. (2017-10-26)

6,000-year-old skull could be from the world's earliest known tsunami victim
Scientists have discovered what they believe is the skull of the earliest known tsunami victim, a person who lived 6,000 years ago in Papua New Guinea. The skull itself was found almost a hundred years ago, but recent analysis of the sediments found with the skull reveals that they bear distinctive hallmarks of tsunami activity. (2017-10-25)

Underwater sound waves help scientists locate ocean impacts
Scientists have developed a new method to locate the precise time and location that objects fall into our oceans. (2017-10-24)

NASA examines heavy rainfall generated by former Typhoon Lan
When Typhoon Lan made landfall in Japan on Oct. 22, the Global Precipitation Measurement mission core satellite or GPM analyzed the storm and added up the high rainfall that it generated. By Oct. 24, Extra-tropical cyclone Lan moved east into the Bering Sea and generated storm warnings. (2017-10-24)

New magma pathways after giant lateral volcano collapses
Giant lateral collapses are huge landslides occurring at the flanks of a volcano. Such collapses are rather common events during the evolution of a large volcanic edifice, often with dramatic consequences such as tsunami and volcano explosions. These catastrophic events interact with the magmatic activity of the volcano, as a new research by scientists of GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences in Nature Communications suggests. (2017-10-23)

A major study finds many planned roads in the tropics shouldn't be built
We are living in the most dramatic era of road expansion in human history, but many planned roads should not be built, concludes a major study by researchers at James Cook University in Australia. (2017-10-23)

WSU researcher links salmon sex to geological change
It turns out that sex can move mountains. A Washington State University researcher has found that the mating habits of salmon can alter the profile of stream beds, affecting the evolution of an entire watershed. His studyis one of the first to quantitatively show that salmon can influence the shape of the land. (2017-10-19)

New study analyzes causes of 2010 landslide in Saint-Jude, Quebec
New study discusses triggers of the Saint-Jude landslide in Quebec that occurred in nearly 10,000-year-old sensitive clay sediment that 'liquefies' when disturbed. (2017-09-26)

The losses that come after the earthquake: Devastating and costly
The study, titled, 'Losses Associated with Secondary Effects in Earthquakes,' published by Frontiers in Built Environmen, looks at the devastation resulting from secondary disasters, such as tsunamis, liquefaction of sediments, fires, landslides, and flooding that occurred during 100 key earthquakes that occurred from 1900 to the present. And unlike previous studies, Daniell et al put a dollar value to the devastation from these secondary causes. (2017-08-25)

Can satellites be used as an early warning system for landslides?
Researchers from Newcastle University (UK), Chengdu University of Technology, Tongji University, China Academy of Space Technology and Wuhan University (China) have been tracking the massive landslide which struck Xinmo Village, Maoxian County, Sichuan Province in China. (2017-07-04)

Distant earthquakes can cause underwater landslides
New research finds large earthquakes can trigger underwater landslides thousands of miles away, weeks or months after the quake occurs. (2017-06-27)

Bangladesh's heavy rainfall examined with NASA's IMERG
At least 156 people in Bangladesh were killed during the past week by landslides and floods caused by heavy rainfall. NASA calculated the amount of rain that has fallen using data from satellites. (2017-06-16)

NASA observes heavy monsoon rainfall in Sri Lanka
NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM satellite constellation provided rainfall data after the monsoon generated large amounts of precipitation in Sri Lanka that caused landslides over the week of May 22. The monsoon continued to affect the island on May 30 when a weather advisory was issued for strong winds. (2017-05-30)

Engineers shine light on deadly landslide
Late in the morning of March 22, 2014, a huge chunk of land cut loose and roared down a hillside in the Stillaguamish River Valley just east of Oso, Washington, about 60 miles northeast of Seattle. In a matter of minutes, 43 people lost their lives as a wall of mud, sand, clay, water and trees cascaded down the hillside into the Steelhead Haven neighborhood, a relatively new housing tract. (2017-04-26)

Hard rocks from Himalaya raise flood risk for millions
Scientists have shown how earthquakes and storms in the Himalaya can increase the impact of deadly floods in one of Earth's most densely populated areas. (2017-04-26)

Landslides on Ceres reflect hidden ice
Massive landslides, similar to those found on Earth, are occurring on the asteroid Ceres. That's according to a new study that adds to the growing evidence that Ceres retains a significant amount of water ice. (2017-04-17)

Seismologists offer detailed look at New Zealand's Kaikoura earthquake
The magnitude 7.8 Kaikoura earthquake that struck the South Island of New Zealand last November was the largest on-land recorded earthquake in the country's history. In a special session at the 2017 Seismological Society of America's (SSA) Annual Meeting, researchers will gather to describe their findings on the quake and its implications for further seismic activity in the region. (2017-04-12)

Developing a microinsurance plan for California earthquakes
Nine out of 10 Californians are uninsured against earthquake risk, which could slow economic recovery in neighborhoods and cities around the state after a damaging quake. On-demand or use-based small insurance policies -- sometimes called microinsurance -- could help fill in that financial gap, according to a presentation at the 2017 Seismological Society of America's (SSA) Annual Meeting. (2017-04-12)

NASA examines Peru's deadly rainfall
The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM constellation of satellites provide data on precipitation rates and totals. Recently the GPM core observatory measured the heavy rainfall that caused extensive flooding and loss of life in Peru. (2017-03-23)

CRUST adds new layer of defense against earthquakes and tsunamis
The first computer model to simulate the whole chain of events triggered by offshore mega subduction earthquakes could reduce losses to life and property caused by disasters like the huge earthquake and tsunami that struck Japan six years ago this Saturday. This pioneering new model has been developed by the CRUST (Cascading Risk and Uncertainty Assessment of Earthquake Shaking and Tsunami) project with funding from the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC). (2017-03-13)

Scientists develop a system that predicts the behavior of tsunamis in less than 10 minutes
The group of Differential Equations, Numerical Analysis and Applications (EDANYA, from its abbreviation in Spanish) at the University of Málaga (UMA) and the Department of Languages and Computer Systems at the University of Granada (UGR) have created a simulator that predicts in less than ten minutes the behavior of tsunamis generated by landslides. (2017-03-13)

NASA examines the soaking from ex-tropical Cyclone Enawo exiting Madagascar
NASA's Aqua satellite observed Ex-Tropical Cyclone Enawo leaving Madagascar, while rainfall data from the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM satellite helped determine the amount of rainfall it brought to the country. (2017-03-09)

The 2013 Bingham Canyon landslide, moment by moment
University of Utah geoscientists have revisited the slide with a combined analysis of aerial photos, computer modeling, and seismic data to pick apart the details. (2017-03-02)

Largest undersea landslide revealed on the Great Barrier Reef
James Cook University scientists have helped discover the remnants of a massive undersea landslide on the Great Barrier Reef, approximately 30 times the volume of Uluru. (2017-02-07)

This Week from AGU: Coal mine dust lowers spectral reflectance of Arctic snow
This Week from AGU: Coal mine dust lowers spectral reflectance of Arctic snow. (2017-02-01)

New project aims to build resilience to earthquakes in the remote Himalayan Kingdom of Bhutan
A new interdisciplinary project led by researchers at the University of Bristol aims to develop resilience and research capacity in the Himalayan Kingdom of Bhutan to cope with earthquakes and their cascading effects on the country's environment, business, infrastructure, and society. (2017-01-27)

Researcher proposes novel mechanism to stop tsunamis in their tracks
Devastating tsunamis could be halted before hitting the Earth's shoreline by firing deep-ocean sound waves at the oncoming mass of water, new research has proposed. (2017-01-25)

Today's rare meteorites were once common
Four-hundred and sixty-six million years ago, there was a giant asteroid collision in outer space, and the debris from that collision has been falling to Earth ever since. But for the first time, scientists have created a reconstruction of the kinds of meteorites that fell before this collision. They discovered that today's common meteorites were once rare, while many meteorites that are rare today were common before the collision. (2017-01-23)

Jane Qiu and Jane Palmer awarded EGU Science Journalism Fellowship
The European Geosciences Union (EGU) has named journalists Jane Qiu and Jane Palmer as the winners of its 2017 Science Journalism Fellowship. Qiu will receive €3,000 to report on glaciers and fjord ecosystems in Svalbard, while Palmer is awarded €2,000 travel to Peru to find out more about the threat posed by slow-moving landslides. (2017-01-18)

NASA spots short-lived Tropical Depression 01W
In just 24 hours after Tropical Depression 01W formed in the Philippine Sea it was already falling apart. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the depression and saw the large, weakening depression being affected by wind shear. (2017-01-09)

Study models Tsunami Risk for Florida and Cuba
While the Caribbean is not thought to be at risk for tsunamis, a new study by researchers at the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science indicates that large submarine landslides on the slopes of the Great Bahama Bank have generated tsunamis in the past and could potentially again in the future. (2016-12-14)

U-M researchers map New Zealand landslides with satellites, drones, helicopters, hiking boots
A University of Michigan-led team of geologists and engineers is mapping surface ruptures and some of the tens of thousands of landslides triggered by last month's magnitude-7.8 earthquake in New Zealand. (2016-12-13)

Climate change to have 'little effect' on common landslides
The frequency of common landslides is not likely to increase as a result of more rainstorms brought about by future climate change, new research from Cardiff University has shown. (2016-10-06)

Quest to find the 'missing physics' at play in landslides
A recent discovery in the study of landslides, using annular shear cell measurements of granular flows, confirms that two flow regimes -- an 'elastic regime' and an 'inertial regime' exist. The researchers discuss their findings in this week's Physics of Fluids. (2016-08-30)

New insights on the relationship between erosion and tectonics in the Himalayas
Can processes unfolding at the Earth's surface be strong enough to influence tectonics? In the past, some scientists have assumed this. But a recent study has shown that it is in fact the other way around. (2016-08-23)

EARTH: Sand shouldn't stand in for volcanic ash in jet engine tests
For decades, sand has been used to simulate the effects volcanic ash may have on aircraft, but in a new study covered by EARTH Magazine, scientists used samples of real volcanic ash from volcanoes of different eruptive styles from around the world. (2016-08-11)

This week from AGU: Denver's ozone problem, earlier snowmelt, and 3 research spotlights
This week from AGU: Denver's ozone problem, earlier snowmelt, and 3 research spotlights. (2016-08-10)

NASA's IMERG measures Hurricane Earl's deadly rainfall in Mexico
Data from NASA's Integrated Multi-satellite Retrievals for GPM (IMERG) were used to estimate the amount of rain that fell from Earl Aug. 2 through Aug. 8. (2016-08-09)

NASA sees Tropical Storm Javier form in the Eastern Pacific
Tropical Storm Javier formed on Aug. 7, 2016, in the Eastern Pacific Ocean off Mexico's western coast. Javier formed partially from the remnants of Hurricane Earl. NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement core satellite found that Javier contained heavy rain. On Aug. 8, Javier triggered hurricane and tropical storm warnings. (2016-08-08)

Subduction zone earthquakes off Oregon, Washington more frequent than previous estimates
A new analysis suggests that massive earthquakes on northern sections of the Cascadia Subduction Zone, affecting areas of the Pacific Northwest that are more heavily populated, are somewhat more frequent than has been believed in the past. The chance of one occurring within the next 50 years is also slightly higher than previously estimated. (2016-08-05)

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