Current Language News and Events

Current Language News and Events, Language News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
Researchers develop speedier network analysis for a range of computer hardware
MIT researchers developed software to more efficiently run graph applications on a range of computing hardware, including both CPUs and GPUs. The advance could boost analysis of social networks, recommendation algorithms, and internet search. (2021-02-22)

How the brain processes sign language
Over 70 million deaf people use sign languages as their preferred communication form. Although they access similar brain structures as spoken languages, it hasn't been identified the brain regions that process both forms of language equally. MPI CBS has now discovered that Broca's area in the left hemisphere, central for spoken languages, is also crucial for sign languages. This is where the grammar and meaning are processed, regardless of whether it is spoken or signed language. (2021-02-19)

Basque ethnic identity and collective empowerment are associated with wellbeing
A member of the Culture, Cognition and Emotion research group at the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque country has explored how social identification with Basque speakers and collective psychological empowerment relate to personal and social wellbeing and community participation. Individuals who experience a high degree of identification with Basque speakers and a high degree of empowerment have been seen to display higher indices of wellbeing. (2021-02-19)

AI may mistake chess discussions as racist talk
'The Queen's Gambit,' the recent TV mini-series about a chess master, may have stirred increased interest in chess, but a word to the wise: social media talk about game-piece colors could lead to misunderstandings, at least for hate-speech detection software. (2021-02-18)

Study finds no gender discrimination when leaders use confident language
People tend to listen to big talkers, whether they are women or men. Still, more women prefer not to use assertive language, according to a new study. Participants in an experiment more often followed advice of people using assertive ''cheap talk,'' statements that cannot be verified as true. (Example: ''I have extremely strong problem-solving skills.'') They followed advice regardless of advice giver's gender but thought others would be less likely to follow female leaders' advice. (2021-02-18)

Foreign language learners should be exposed to slang in the classroom and here's why....
Experts say English slang and regional dialect should not be banned from classrooms but when you're getting to grips with a second language how helpful is it to learn non-standard lingo? Very, says Sascha Stollhans, of the Department of Languages and Cultures at Lancaster University, who argues that standardised language norms are artificial and language learners should learn about all aspects of language, even the controversial ones. (2021-02-17)

Predicting words' grammatical properties helps us read faster
Psycholinguists from the HSE Centre for Language and Brain found that when reading, people are not only able to predict specific words, but also words' grammatical properties, which helps them to read faster. Researchers have also discovered that predictability of words and grammatical features can be successfully modelled with the use of neural networks. The study was published in the journal PLOS ONE. (2021-02-16)

The politics of synonyms
A team of researchers at Carnegie Mellon University found people are more successful at identifying language associated with Republican speech than Democratic speech patterns. The results are available in the February issue of the journal PLOS. (2021-02-11)

Google Scholar renders documents not in English invisible
It affects scientific articles and conference papers, according to a recent study published in the journal Future Internet, by Cristòfol Rovira, Lluís Codina and Carles Lopezosa, researchers with the Department of Communication. (2021-02-10)

Women's voices in the media still outnumbered by those of men - study
New research from Simon Fraser University shows that women's voices continue to be underrepresented in the media, despite having prominent female leaders across Canada and internationally. Researchers in SFU's Discourse Processing Lab found that men outnumber women quoted in Canadian news media about three to one. The findings from the team's Gender Gap Tracker study were published this week in the journal PLOS ONE. (2021-02-05)

Use of pronouns may show signs of an impeding breakup
Evidence of an impending breakup may exist in the small words used in everyday conversations months before either partner realizes where their relationship is heading, according to new psychology research. (2021-02-01)

Apps help integration and health of migrants
A new study has found that mobile apps can play a vital role in helping immigrants integrate into new cultures, as well as provide physical and mental health benefits. (2021-01-29)

A computational approach to understanding how infants perceive language
A multi-institutional team of cognitive scientists and computational linguists have developed computationally-based modeling approach that opens the path toward a much deeper understanding of early language acquisition. (2021-01-29)

Researchers use AI to help businesses understand Code of Federal Regs, other legal docs
Automated Legal Document Analytics (ALDA) provides tools for people, businesses, and other entities to understand highly complex, legally binding documents. Using AI, a UMBC team has now broken down the Code of Federal Regulations into components that are semantically linked for automated analysis. This means that any user can 'ask' the system whether something is allowable under the code, increasing their understanding of it and their access to opportunities that require CFR compliance. (2021-01-29)

They're just not that into you: Consumer-brand relationship insights
To reap benefits from a variety of brand relationships, marketers should match their marketing communications to how close or distant consumers feel toward their brands. (2021-01-28)

Pace of prehistoric human innovation could be revealed by 'linguistic thermometer'
A physics professor has joined forces with language experts to build a 'linguistic thermometer' that can record the temperature of 'hot' or 'cold' (ie fast or slow) developments in modern linguistic features to create a computer-based model that can provide a better understanding of the development in human language and innovation stretching back to pre-history. (2021-01-27)

When simpler is harder
Some languages require less neural activity than others. But these are not necessarily the ones we would imagine. In a study published today in the journal PLOS Biology, researchers at the University of Zurich have shown that languages that are often considered 'easy' actually require an enormous amount of work from our brains. (2021-01-27)

CT imaging features of patients infected with 2019 novel coronavirus
CT Imaging Features of Patients Infected with 2019 Novel Coronavirus https://doi.org/10.15212/bioi-2020-0038 Announcing a new publication for BIO Integration journal. In this opinion article the authors Tianhong Yao, Huirong Lin, Jingsong Mao, Shuaidong Huo and Gang Liu from Xiamen University, Xiamen, China discuss CT imaging features of patients infected with 2019 novel coronavirus. (2021-01-26)

Stimulating brain pathways shows origins of human language and memory
Scientists have identified that the evolutionary development of human and primate brains may have been similar for communication and memory. (2021-01-25)

RUDN University linguists conducted comprehensive study of how Russian speakers perceive Greek sound
Linguists from RUDN University found out how Russian speakers differentiate between similar consonants of the Greek language and associate them with Russian sounds. (2021-01-25)

Growing up in a bilingual home has lasting benefits
New research has found that growing up in a bilingual home can provide unexpected cognitive benefits later in life. The study, published in the journal Scientific Reports, demonstrates for the first time that adults who acquired their second language as a young child (early bilinguals) are quicker at shifting attention and quicker at detecting visual changes compared to adults who learnt their second language later in life (late bilinguals). (2021-01-22)

Neuronal recycling: This is how our brain allows us to read
Is there an area and cognitive mechanism in our brain specifically devoted to reading? Probably not. According to new research, underlying reading there is evolutionarily ancient function more generally used to process many other visual stimuli. We process letters and words similarly to how we do with any visual stimulus: we identify basic features as shape, size, structure. On the basis of the statistical frequency of specific symbols, we can recognise orthography, understand it and immerse ourselves in the pleasure of reading. (2021-01-21)

Direct current stimulation of the brain over Wernicke's area can help people learn new words
Researchers from the Laboratory of Behavioural Neurodynamics at St Petersburg University have studied how different types of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) of the brain affect the acquisition of new words. Their experiments have shown that cathodal tDCS over Wernicke's area enables subjects to better remember new abstract words - those that refer to non-physical entities and ideas. (2021-01-20)

College classrooms are still chilly for women, as men speak more
Men speak 1.6 times more often than women in college classrooms, revealing how gender inequities regarding classroom participation still exist, according to a Dartmouth study. By comparison, women are more hesitant to speak and are more apt to use apologetic language. The findings are published in Gender & Society. (2021-01-18)

Algorithms designed to study language predict virus 'escape' mutations for SARS-CoV-2 and others
By bridging the conceptual divide between human language and viral evolution, researchers have developed a powerful new tool for predicting the mutations that allow viruses to 'escape' human immunity or vaccines. (2021-01-14)

Model analyzes how viruses escape the immune system
MIT researchers have devised a way to computationally model viral escape, using models that were originally developed to model language. The model can predict which sections of viral surface proteins, including those of influenza, HIV, and SARS-CoV-2, are more likely to mutate in a way that allows the virus to evade the human immune system. It can also identify sections that are less likely to mutate, making them good targets for new vaccines. (2021-01-14)

Higher vaccine rates associated with indicative language by provider, more efficient
New research from Boston Medical Center finds that using clear, unambiguous language when recommending HPV vaccination both increases vaccine acceptance and increases conversation efficiency while preserving patient satisfaction. (2021-01-12)

Black and Hispanic Californians face health discrimination; less trusting of clinicians
A recent statewide survey of Californians uncovered that 30% of Black adults and 13% of Hispanic adults felt that they have been judged or treated differently by a health care provider because of their race/ethnicity or language. (2021-01-12)

Youth with family history of suicide attempts have worse neurocognitive functioning
Children and adolescents with a family history of suicide attempts have lower executive functioning, shorter attention spans, and poorer language reasoning than those without a family history, according to a new study by researchers from the Lifespan Brain Institute (LiBI) of Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and the University of Pennsylvania. The study is the largest to date to examine the neurocognitive functioning of youth who have a biological relative who made a suicide attempt. (2021-01-11)

Ferroptosis resistance in cancer: An emerging crisis of new hope
Announcing a new publication for BIO Integration journal. In this opinion article the authors Daiyun Xu, Yonghui Lü, Yongxiao Li, Shengbin Li, Zhe Wang and Junqing Wang from Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, China discuss ferroptosis resistance in cancer. (2021-01-08)

Autism theory 25 years in the making
A unifying explanation of the cause of autism and the reason for its rising prevalence has eluded scientists for decades, but a theoretical model published in the journal Medical Hypotheses describes the cause as a combination of socially valued traits, common in autism, and any number of co-occurring disabilities. (2021-01-08)

Guinea baboons grunt with an accent
Vocal learning leads to modification of call structure in a multi-level baboon society (2021-01-06)

ADDF presents vision of a consortium to accelerate research into speech and language biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease
In a commentary in Exploration in Medicine, Alzheimer's experts lay out a vision for a worldwide research consortium that can give clinicians -- and patients -- the answers to which speech and language changes may signal Alzheimer's in the form of digital biomarkers. (2021-01-05)

Metabolic syndrome 'interacts' with COVID-19
Announcing a new publication for BIO Integration journal. In this review article the authors Zeling Guo, Shanping Jiang, Zilun Li and Sifan Chen from Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, China review how metabolic syndrome 'interacts' with COVID-19. (2020-12-23)

Understanding nanoparticle entry mechanism into tumors
Announcing a new publication for BIO Integration journal. In this commentary the authors Phei Er Saw and Sangyong Jon from Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, China and the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon, Korea, consider how the entry mechanism of nanoparticles into tumors determines the future direction of nanomedicine development. (2020-12-23)

Physician-led Spanish-speaking volunteers address health care inequities during a crisis
In a perspective published in the Journal of Hospital Medicine, experts from the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) Department of Medicine, Office of Equity and Inclusion and Center for Diversity and Inclusion call for a more inclusive and culturally competent approach to clinical care based on best practices developed during the COVID-19 surge in Massachusetts. (2020-12-23)

Talking like a woman in TED Talks is associated with more popularity
Talking like a woman at online TED Talks is being ''uniquely rewarded'' with more views according to researchers, who say female language style is an ''underappreciated but highly effective tool for social influence''. The researchers wanted to find out which was more predictive of TED Talk impact: a more instrumental and complex male-typical language style or a simpler and more personally engaging female-typical language style. (2020-12-16)

Female language style promotes visibility and influence online
A female-typical language style promotes the popularity of talks in the digital context and turns out to be an underappreciated but highly effective tool for social influence. This was shown by UZH psychologists in an international study in which they analyzed 1,100 TED Talks. (2020-12-16)

To the brain, reading computer code is not the same as reading language
MIT neuroscientists have found reading computer code does not rely on the regions of the brain involved in language processing. Instead, it activates the ''multiple demand network,'' which is also recruited for complex cognitive tasks such as solving math problems or crossword puzzles. (2020-12-15)

This is your brain on code: JHU deciphers neural mechanics of computer programming
By mapping the brain activity of expert computer programmers while they puzzled over code, Johns Hopkins University scientists have found the neural mechanics behind this increasingly vital skill. (2020-12-15)

Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.