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Current Large Hadron Collider News and Events, Large Hadron Collider News Articles.
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New finding of particle physics may help to explain the absence of antimatter
With the help of computer simulations, particle physics researchers may be able to explain why there is more matter than antimatter in the Universe. (2018-11-13)
Machine learning improves accuracy of particle identification at LHC
Scientists from the Higher School of Economics have developed a method that allows physicists at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) to separate between various types of elementary particles with a high degree of accuracy. (2018-10-31)
The big problem of small data: A new approach
You've heard of 'big data' but what about small? Researches have crafted a modern approach that could solve a decades-old problem in statistics. (2018-10-18)
Scientists achieve first ever acceleration of electrons in plasma waves
An international team of researchers, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has demonstrated a new technique for accelerating electrons to very high energies over short distances. (2018-10-13)
Newly detected microquasar gamma-rays 'call for new ideas'
The first-ever detection of highly energetic radiation from a microquasar has astrophysicists scrambling for new theories to explain the extreme particle acceleration. (2018-10-04)
Mountaintop observatory sees gamma rays from exotic Milky Way object
The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Gamma-Ray Observatory (HAWC) collaboration has detected highly energetic light coming from a microquasar -- a black hole that gobbles up stuff from a companion star and blasts out powerful jets of material. (2018-10-03)
Scientists discover new nursery for superpowered photons
A strange star system in our own Milky Way is producing some of the most powerful gamma rays ever seen. (2018-10-03)
New observations to understand the phase transition in quantum chromodynamics
In the current issue of the science journal Nature, an international team of scientists presents an analysis of a series of experiments which sheds light on the nature of the phase transition after the Big Bang about 13.7 billion years ago. (2018-09-20)
NYU Physicists develop new techniques to enhance data analysis for large hadron collider
NYU physicists have created new techniques that deploy machine learning as a means to significantly improve data analysis for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the world's most powerful particle accelerator. (2018-09-12)
Russian scientists have increased the Internet speed up to one and a half times
A joint article of the scientists of the Samara University and the University of Missouri (Columbia, USA) was published in the IEEE Transactions on Network and Service Management journal. (2018-08-31)
The potential harbingers of new physics just don't want to disappear
For some time now, in the data from the LHCb experiment at the Large Hadron Collider, several anomalies have been seen in the decays of beauty mesons. (2018-08-30)
SMU physicist explains the latest Higgs boson announcement in layman's terms
The discovery of the Higgs boson transforming as it decays into bottom quarks is a big step forward in the quest to understand how the Higgs particle enables fundamental particles to acquire mass. (2018-08-29)
Higgs particle's favorite 'daughter' comes home
In a finding that caps years of exploration into the tiny particle known as the Higgs boson, researchers have traced the fifth and most prominent way that the particle decays into other particles. (2018-08-28)
Mini antimatter accelerator could rival the likes of the Large Hadron Collider
Researchers have found a way to accelerate antimatter in a 1000x smaller space than current accelerators, boosting the science of exotic particles. (2018-08-09)
'New physics' charmingly escapes us
In the world of elementary particles, traces of a potential 'new physics' may be concealed in processes related to the decay of baryons. (2018-08-02)
A domestic electron ion collider would unlock scientific mysteries of atomic nuclei
The science questions that could be answered by an electron ion collider (EIC) -- a very large-scale particle accelerator - are significant to advancing our understanding of the atomic nuclei that make up all visible matter in the universe, says a new report by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. (2018-07-24)
Ghostly particle points to long-sought high-energy cosmic ray source
With the help of an icebound detector situated a mile beneath the South Pole, an international team of scientists has found the first evidence of a source of high-energy cosmic neutrinos, ghostly subatomic particles that can travel in a straight line for billions of light-years, passing unhindered through galaxies, stars and anything else nature throws in its path. (2018-07-12)
New era of space research launched by IceCube Observatory and global team of astronomers
The first-ever identification of a deep-space source of the super-energetic subatomic high-energy neutrino particles has launched a new era of space research. (2018-07-12)
Breakthrough in the search for cosmic particle accelerators
In a global observation campaign, scientist have for the first time located a source of high-energy cosmic neutrinos, ghostly elementary particles that travel billions of light years through the universe, flying unaffected through stars, planets and entire galaxies. (2018-07-12)
A step closer to single-atom data storage
Physicists at EPFL used Scanning Tunneling Microscopy to successfully test the stability of a magnet made up of a single atom. (2018-07-11)
Researchers detect Higgs boson coupling with top quark
Detection of Higgs-top quark interaction at LHC by CMS and Atlas international collaborations, with Brazilian researchers participating, confirms theoretical predictions of Standard Model of particle physics. (2018-07-05)
USTC contributes to LHC experiment discovery on Higgs Boson
Research team from University and Science and Technology of China contributed much to the results of the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). (2018-06-25)
The chances of detecting clumps in atomic nuclei are growing
What do atomic nuclei really look like? Are the protons and neutrons they contain distributed chaotically? (2018-06-14)
Study develops a model enhancing particle beam efficiency
Inspired by tokamaks, Brazilians researchers create via computer simulation an alternative for better control, in accelerators, of the particles' chaotic trajectories. (2018-06-07)
Direct coupling of the Higgs boson to the top quark observed
An observation made by the CMS experiment at CERN unambiguously demonstrates the interaction of the Higgs boson and top quarks, which are the heaviest known subatomic particles. (2018-06-04)
Supercomputers provide new window into the life and death of a neutron
A team has enlisted powerful supercomputers to calculate a quantity, known as the 'nucleon axial coupling' or gA, that is central to our understanding of a neutron's lifetime. (2018-05-30)
Microscopic universe provides insight into life and death of a neutron
Experiments on the lifetime of a neutron reveal surprising and unexplained deviations. (2018-05-30)
Matter-antimatter asymmetry may interfere with the detection of neutrinos
From the data collected by the LHCb detector at the Large Hadron Collider, it appears that the particles known as charm mesons and their antimatter counterparts are not produced in perfectly equal proportions. (2018-05-24)
The weak side of the proton
A new result from the Q-weak experiment at the Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility provides a precision test of the weak force, one of four fundamental forces in nature. (2018-05-09)
Physicists lay groundwork to better understand the birth of the universe
Sebastian Deffner at UMBC and Anthony Bartolotta at Caltech have developed the first techniques for describing the thermodynamics of very small systems with very high energy -- like the universe at the start of the Big Bang -- which could lead to a better understanding of the birth of the universe and other cosmological phenomena. (2018-03-06)
Meet the 'odderon': Large Hadron Collider experiment shows potential evidence of quasiparticle sought for decades
A team of high-energy experimental particle physicists, including several from the University of Kansas, has uncovered possible evidence of a subatomic quasiparticle dubbed an (2018-02-01)
Applying machine learning to the universe's mysteries
Berkeley Lab physicists and their collaborators have demonstrated that computers are ready to tackle the universe's greatest mysteries -- they used neural networks to perform a deep dive into data simulating the subatomic particle soup that may have existed just microseconds after the big bang. (2018-01-30)
New for three types of extreme-energy space particles: Theory shows unified origin
One of the biggest mysteries in astroparticle physics has been the origins of ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays, very high-energy neutrinos, and high-energy gamma rays. (2018-01-22)
Surprising result shocks scientists studying spin
Scientists analyzing results of spinning protons striking different sized atomic nuclei at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) found an odd directional preference in the production of neutrons that switches sides as the size of the nuclei increases. (2018-01-08)
We need one global network of 1000 stations to build an Earth observatory
Professor Markku Kulmala calls for a continuous, comprehensive monitoring of interactions between the planet's surface and atmosphere in his article 'Build a global Earth observatory' published in Nature, Jan. (2018-01-04)
MACHOs are dead, WIMPs are a no-show -- say hello to SIMPs
The nature of dark matter remains elusive, with numerous experimental searches for WIMPs coming up empty-handed and MACHOs all but abandoned. (2017-12-04)
The most exotic fluid has an unexpectedly low viscosity
Collisions of lead nuclei in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) particle accelerator take place at such great energies that quarks that are normally confined inside nucleons are released and, together with the gluons that hold them together, form a stream of particularly exotic fluid: quark-gluon plasma. (2017-10-26)
Swansea University's physicists develop a new quantum simulation protocol
A step closer to understanding quantum mechanics: Swansea University's physicists develop a new quantum simulation protocol. (2017-10-20)
Physics boosts artificial intelligence methods
Researchers from Caltech and the University of Southern California (USC) report the first application of quantum computing to a physics problem. (2017-10-18)
Electrons surfing on a laser beam
The largest particle accelerator in the world - the Large Hadron Collider at CERN in Switzerland -- has a circumference of around 26 kilometres. (2017-10-10)
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