Current Laser Light News and Events

Current Laser Light News and Events, Laser Light News Articles.
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Simply speaking while infected can potentially spread COVID-19
COVID-19 can spread from asymptomatic but infected people through small aerosol droplets in their exhaled breath. Most studies of the flow of exhaled air have focused on coughing or sneezing; however, speaking while near one another is also risky. In Physics of Fluids, scientists used smoke and laser light to study the flow of expelled breath near and around two people conversing in various relative postures commonly found in the service industry. (2021-02-23)

Terrestrial laser scanning for monitoring hydrological cycle of trees
Water is an essential element for all living things. Understanding the dynamics of water in trees is crucial for understanding the consequences of climate change and altered water availability for forest ecosystems. A joint research project with Samuli Junttila PhD, and Professor Masato Katoh of Shinshu University's Institute for Mountain Science and others demonstrates a new laser scanning based method that can be used to monitor changes in leaf water content of tree communities. (2021-02-22)

New "metalens" shifts focus without tilting or moving
An MIT-fabricated metalens shifts focus without tilting, shifting, or otherwise moving. The design may enable miniature zoom lenses for drones, cellphones, or night-vision goggles. (2021-02-22)

New sensor paves way to low-cost sensitive methane measurements
Researchers have developed a new sensor that could allow practical and low-cost detection of low concentrations of methane gas. Measuring methane emissions and leaks is important to a variety of industries because the gas contributes to global warming and air pollution. (2021-02-22)

Fibre-integrated, high-repetition-rate water window soft X-ray source
The generation and characterization of light in the soft X-ray domain of the spectrum play an ever-growing role in advancing fundamental research, life science and industrial applications. To meet the continuous demand for powerful, application-oriented optical tools, scientists from Germany have developed a new laser-driven soft X-ray source with a fibre-integrated setup. The approach establishes a new route toward simple and powerful soft X-ray sources, which will enhance and expand applications of short-wavelength light. (2021-02-22)

Seeing stable topology using instabilities
The researchers explore how topological phases of light in nonlinear optical media undergo the process of modulational instability. (2021-02-19)

Artificial intelligence predicts nonlinear ultrafast dynamics in optics
Researchers at Tampere University have successfully used artificial intelligence to predict nonlinear dynamics that take place when ultrashort light pulses interact with matter. This novel solution can be used for efficient and fast numerical modelling, for example, in imaging, manufacturing and surgery. The findings were published in the prestigious Nature Machine Intelligence journal. (2021-02-19)

Atomic nuclei in the quantum swing
The extremely precise control of nuclear excitations opens up possibilities of ultra-precise atomic clocks and powerful nuclear batteries. (2021-02-19)

Ultrafast electron dynamics in space and time
Often depicted as colourful balloons or clouds, electron orbitals provide information on the whereabouts of electrons in molecules, a bit like fuzzy snapshots. In order to understand the exchange of electrons in chemical reactions, it is not only important to know their spatial distribution but also their motion in time. Scientists from Julich, Marburg, and Graz have now made huge progress in this direction: They successfully recorded orbital images with an extremely high temporal resolution. (2021-02-18)

Spin hall effect of light with near 100% efficiency
POSTECH-KAIST joint research team develops perfect SHEL using anisotropic metasurfaces. (2021-02-18)

Edible holograms could someday decorate foods
Holograms are everywhere, from driver's licenses to credit cards to product packaging. And now, edible holograms could someday enhance foods. Researchers reporting in ACS Nano have developed a laser-based method to print nanostructured holograms on dried corn syrup films. The edible holograms could also be used to ensure food safety, label a product or indicate sugar content, the researchers say. (2021-02-17)

Cosmetic laser may boost effectiveness of certain anti-cancer therapies
In mice treated with cancer immunotherapy, shining a cosmetic laser on a tumor boosted the therapy's effectiveness. The strategy stimulated the immune system to attack nonmutated proteins on the tumor. The findings may help investigators make cancer immunotherapy effective against currently incurable cancers. (2021-02-17)

Electrons living on the edge
University of Tsukuba researchers calculated the electronic structure of topological insulators excited by laser beams and found that massless states can be generated. This work may lead to a major advance in computer technology with circuits that generate less heat. (2021-02-17)

Cancer research: Targeted elimination of leukemic stem cells
Cancer research in Bern has discovered a further mechanism to combat leukemia: a research team at Inselspital, Bern University Hospital and the University of Bern has succeeded in identifying an important signaling pathway for regulating leukemic stem cells. With this discovery, the researchers are expanding the arsenal of potentially highly effective drugs against leukemia. (2021-02-16)

Nanotechnologies reduce friction and improve durability of materials
A team of scientists from the National Research Nuclear University MEPhI and Immanuel Kant Baltic State Federal University suggested using innovative thin films to considerably reduce friction and thus increase the durability of surfaces in mechanisms. This discovery can be important for many fields, from medicine to space technologies. (2021-02-16)

Sloshing quantum fluids of light and matter to probe superfluidity
'Sloshing' of a quantum fluid comprised of light and matter reveals superfluid properties. An Australian-led team have successfully created sloshing quantum liquids in a 'bucket' formed by containment lasers, gaining new insights of the intriguing superfluid properties of this peculiar, hybrid light-matter system. Superfluidity--the flow of particles without resistance--is pursued by FLEET researchers for future applications in ultra low-energy electronics. (2021-02-16)

Observations at a shed light on how hard coral survives without light
French researchers have studied for the first time the distribution of hard corals in the French Polynesian archipelago, from the surface to 120 metres deep. As the amount of light decreases, this coral associates with other filamentous algae, in addition to zooxanthellae, which become inserted into its skeleton. These algae, the only ones found at this depth, could therefore play an important role in the coral's adaptation to life at depth. (2021-02-16)

A sharper look at the interior of semiconductors
A research team at Friedrich Schiller University Jena (Germany) developed a high-resolution imaging method based on extreme short-wave UV light. It can be used to examine internal structures in semiconductors non-destructively, and with nanometre precision as the team reported in the current issue of the journal 'Optica'. (2021-02-16)

Light used to detect quantum information stored in 100,000 nuclear quantum bits
Researchers have found a way to use light and a single electron to communicate with a cloud of quantum bits and sense their behaviour, making it possible to detect a single quantum bit in a dense cloud. (2021-02-15)

Capturing free-space optical light for high-speed wifi
Visible and infrared light can carry more data than radio waves, but has always been confined to a hard-wired, fiber-optic cable. Working with Facebook's Connectivity Lab, a Duke research team has now made a major advance toward the dream of ditching the fiber in fiber optics. (2021-02-11)

Vibrating 2D materials
Two-dimensional materials hold out hope for many technical applications. An international research team now has determined for the first time how strongly 2D materials vibrate when electronically excited with light. (2021-02-11)

Origami powered by light
Some man-made materials can mimic plants' slow but steady reaction to light energy, usually triggered by lasers or focused ambient light. New research from the University of Pittsburgh and Carnegie Mellon University has discovered a way to speed up this effect enough that its performance can compete against electrical and pneumatic systems. (2021-02-10)

Physicists finesse the storing of light to create rainbows of colour
Physicists at the University of Bath have found a way to use resonance to harness the energy of light more effectively inside microresonators. (2021-02-09)

THz spectroscopy tracks electron solvation in photoionized water
''This work provides insights on the fundamental aspects of the charge transport process in water and lays a foundation for further understanding of the physicochemical properties and transient evolution of femtosecond-laser-pulse-excited plasma in water.'' (2021-02-09)

3D-printed spectrometer on a 100 x100 μm² footprint
The miniaturisation of spectroscopic measurement devices opens novel information channels in medical science or consumer electronics. Scientists of the University of Stuttgart, Germany, developed a 3D-printed miniature spectrometer with a volume of 100 × 100 × 300 μm³ and a spectral resolution of up to 10 nm in the visible range. This spectrometer can be manufactured directly onto camera sensors, and a parallel arrangement allows for quick (''snapshot'') and low profile, highly customizable hyperspectral cameras. (2021-02-08)

Silicon waveguides move us closer to faster, light-based logic circuits
IBM researchers have succeeded in guiding visible light through a silicon wire efficiently, an important milestone in the exploration towards a new breed of faster, more efficient logic circuits. (2021-02-08)

'Multiplying' light could be key to ultra-powerful optical computers
New type of optical computing could solve highly complex problems that are out of reach for even the most powerful supercomputers. (2021-02-08)

Scientists measure spectral line of Cherenkov radiation in radiant regime
The scientists of Tomsk Polytechnic University jointly with the colleagues from Keysight company have conducted an experiment with an electron beam at the TPU microtron to study a super-radiant regime that occurs when radiation is generated by a train of electron bunches. The research findings obtained by a high-precision measurement of a spectral line width proved that about 8,000 electron bunches in a super-radiant regime form monochromatic Cherenkov radiation. This experiment was conducted for the first time. (2021-02-07)

Forests of the world in 3D
Primeval forests are of great importance for biodiversity and global carbon and water cycling. The three-dimensional structure of forests plays an important role because it influences processes of gas and energy exchange with the atmosphere, and provides habitats for numerous species. An international research team led by Göttingen University investigated the variety of different complex structures found in the world's forests, and the factors that explain this diversity. Results were published in Nature Communications. (2021-02-05)

Researchers from NUS create 'whirling' nano-structures in anti-ferromagnets
Inspired by the Big Bang cooling, the new finding could lead to super-fast, energy-efficient memory chips. (2021-02-04)

An optical coating like no other
The technology, based on Fano resonance, results in a coating that fully reflects only a very narrow wavelength. The technology could improve the effectiveness of devices that use hybrid thermal-electric power generation as a solar energy option. (2021-02-04)

Large-area periodic perovskite nanostructures for lenticular printing laser displays
We fabricated large-area periodic structures with spatial resolution at wavelength scale from hybrid perovskite materials via a space-confined solution growth method. It takes advantages of both high refractive index contrast and high luminescence brightness, which allows the optical modulation on not only the reflection of illumination, but also the light emission from hybrid perovskites. The distributed feedback within these periodic structures significantly improves the degree of polarization and directionality of laser action while its threshold is also reduced. (2021-02-04)

Switching nanolight on and off
The report demonstrates a new method to control the flow of light of nanolight. Optical manipulation on the nanoscale, or nanophotonics, has become a critical area of interest as researchers seek ways to meet the increasing demand for technologies that go well beyond what is possible with conventional photonics and electronics. (2021-02-04)

CO2 laser therapy helps improve sexual function in postmenopausal women with breast cancer
CLEVELAND, Ohio (Feb 3, 2021)--Postmenopausal women often complain of painful intercourse or a lack of desire caused by decreased estrogen levels, which affect vaginal elasticity and lubrication. Survivors of breast cancer typically experience worse symptoms as a result of cancer treatments, and concerns exist regarding hormone therapies. A new study suggests that fractional CO2 laser therapy may help. Study results are published online in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS). (2021-02-03)

New ink jet approach offers simple way to print microdisk lasers for biosensing
Researchers have developed a unique inkjet printing method for fabricating tiny biocompatible polymer microdisk lasers for biosensing applications. The approach enables production of both the laser and sensor in a room temperature, open-air environment, potentially enabling new uses of biosensing technologies for health monitoring and disease diagnostics. (2021-02-03)

Dynamic 3D printing process features a light-driven twist
The speed of light has come to 3D printing. Northwestern University engineers have developed a new method that uses light to improve 3D printing speed and precision while also, in combination with a high-precision robot arm, providing the freedom to move, rotate or dilate each layer as the structure is being built. The method introduces the 'on-the-fly' ability to manipulate the original design layer by layer and pivot the printing direction without recreating the model. (2021-02-03)

Tracking cells with omnidirectional visible laser particles
Microlaser particles have emerged as unique optical probes for single-cell tacking. However, due to inherent directionality of laser emission, cell tracking with laser particles suffers from frequent loss of cell traces. Recently, scientists in Harvard Medical School and Peking University placed omnidirectional visible laser particles into live cells, and demonstrated continuous spatial tracking of single cells. The technique will open new avenues for large-scale single-cell analysis in the study of cellular heterogeneity. (2021-02-02)

Air-guiding in solid-core optical waveguides: A solution for on-chip trace gas spectroscopy
We demonstrate an air-suspended waveguide that exhibits exceptional field delocalization and an external field confinement of 107 %, providing a stronger interaction with the surrounding air than a free-space beam. Operating at mid-infrared wavelengths, the waveguide is an ideal building block of next-generation on-chip sensors for sensitive and specific trace gas detection by tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS). (2021-02-02)

The benefits of reading outdoors
Investigators demonstrate that image luminance has opposite effects on the contrast sensitivity of cortical pathways signaling lights than darks. It impairs luminance discrimination for the brightest stimuli of the scene while improving it for the darkest stimuli, a mechanism that is needed to efficiently sample natural scenes. (2021-02-02)

A new hands-off probe uses light to explore electron behavior in a topological insulator
Topological insulators are one of the most puzzling quantum materials. Their edges are electron superhighways where electrons flow with no loss, while the bulk of the material blocks electron flow - properties that could be useful in quantum computing and information processing. Researchers at SLAC and Stanford used a process called high harmonic generation to separately probe electron behavior in both of those domains. The method should be applicable to a broad range of quantum materials. (2021-02-02)

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