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Laser pulses reveal the superconductors of the future
A new study has revealed that the dream of more efficient energy usage can turn into reality. An international collaboration, led by the scientists of Italy's SISSA in Trieste, Università Cattolica di Brescia and Politecnico di Milano used suitably tailored laser pulses to snap the electronic interactions in a compound containing copper, oxygen and bismuth. This research opens new perspectives for the development of superconducting materials with applications in electronics, diagnostics and transport. (2017-05-09)

Stanford team brings quantum computing closer to reality with new materials
Quantum computing could outsmart current computing for complex problem solving, but only if scientists figure out how to make it practical. A Stanford team is investigating new materials that could become the basis for such an advance. (2017-05-08)

Space radiation reproduced in the lab for better, safer missions
Man-made space radiation has been produced in research led by the University of Strathclyde, which could help to make space exploration safer, more reliable and more extensive. (2017-05-08)

With more light, chemistry speeds up
Light initiates many chemical reactions. Experiments at the Laser Centre of the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences and the University of Warsaw's Faculty of Physics have for the first time demonstrated that increasing the intensity of illumination some reactions can be significantly faster. Here, acceleration was achieved using pairs of ultrashort laser pulses. (2017-05-04)

Biggest X-ray laser in the world generates its first laser light
European XFEL, the biggest X-ray laser in the world, has generated its first X-ray laser light. The X-ray light has a wavelength of 0.8 nm -- about 500 times shorter than that of visible light. At first lasing, the laser had a repetition rate of one pulse per second, which will later increase to 27,000 per second. (2017-05-04)

Lasers shed light on the inner workings of the giant larvacean
New laser technology is allowing MBARI scientists to look into the structure of giant larvaceans -- tadpole-like marine animals that are important players in ocean ecosystems. (2017-05-03)

Erasable ink for 3-D printing
3-D printing by direct laser writing produces micrometer-sized structures with precisely defined properties. Researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have now developed a method to erase the ink used for 3-D printing. In this way, the small structures of up to 100 nm in size can be erased and rewritten repeatedly. One nanometer corresponds to one millionth of a millimeter. This development opens up many new applications of 3-D fabrication in biology or materials sciences, for instance. (2017-05-02)

Photoluminescent display absorbs, converts light into energy
A study recently published in the SPIE Journal of Photonics for Energy demonstrates how to convert a luminescent solar concentrator into an energy-harvesting laser phosphor display by projecting intensity modulated light. The journal is published by SPIE, the international society for optics and photonics. (2017-05-01)

New organic lasers one step closer to reality
Researchers at Kyushu University's Center for Organic Photonics and Electronics Research have developed an optically pumped organic thin-film laser that can continuously emit light for 30 ms, which is more than 100 times longer than previous devices. (2017-04-28)

UTSA professor's study describes new way to predict tumor growth
A new study by Yusheng Feng, professor of mechanical engineering at The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA), describes an algorithm that can predict the growth of cancerous tumors, which could help medical professionals judge the best treatment options for patients. (2017-04-18)

Method improves semiconductor fiber optics, paves way for developing devices
A new method to improve semiconductor fiber optics may lead to a material structure that might one day revolutionize the global transmission of data, according to an interdisciplinary team of researchers. (2017-04-13)

HKU palaeontologist reconstructs feathered dinosaurs in the flesh
Until now it has been hard to get an accurate idea of the shape of a dinosaur from its fossilised remains, as only their bones are usually preserved. Using a new technique, Dr Michael Pittman from the Department of Earth Sciences, the University of Hong Kong and his collaborators reconstructed the first highly detailed body outline of a feathered dinosaur based on high-definition images of its preserved soft tissues. (2017-04-10)

Eat wild venison to support native woodland birds, says ecologist
Wild deer in Britain should be hunted for venison to drastically reduce their populations and support the re-emergence of our native woodland birds, according to an academic at the University of Nottingham. (2017-04-10)

Laser-based dermatological procedures could be revolutionized with new technique
Clinicians and dermatologists have seen a rise in demand for minimally invasive laser-based treatments, including tattoo removal. However, it is difficult for the laser light to be perfectly and selectively absorbed by only the targeted birthmark or tattoo. Now, researchers from the University of Missouri have developed instruments that transmit laser light into the tissue through direct contact. The techniques developed will reduce safety concerns in laser dermatology by improving laser transmission. (2017-04-10)

Researchers find mechanism to protect biomolecules against light-induced damage
A team at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) together with researchers in Sweden and the USA has analyzed a mechanism which protects biomolecules such as the DNA against damage by light. They observed how the energy of incoming photons can be absorbed by the molecule without destroying important bonds. (2017-04-10)

The inner lives of molecules
Researchers from Canada, the UK and Germany have developed a new experimental technique to take 3-D images of molecules in action. This tool can help scientists better understand the quantum mechanics underlying bigger and more complex molecules. They describe their work in this week's The Journal of Chemical Physics. (2017-04-04)

Improving silver nanowires for FTCEs with flash light interactions
A Korean research team led by Professor Keon Jae Lee of the Materials Science and Engineering Department at KAIST and Dr. Hong-Jin Park from BSP Inc., has developed high-performance Ag NWs with strong adhesion on plastic using flash light-material interactions. (2017-04-04)

Proton beam power boosted with pulsed lasers, promising better proton therapies
A Japan-based research team led by Osaka University demonstrated multiple sharp, ultra-short laser pulses that promise new types of proton-beam systems potentially useful in areas such as cancer treatment. By combining the pulses to effectively create longer pulses, high-energy charged particles can be produced at laser intensities 100 times less than predicted by previous theoretical models. These findings provide insights into construction of more efficient beam facilities. (2017-04-04)

Nanoscopic golden springs change color of twisted light
University of Bath scientists have used gold spring-shaped coils 5,000 times thinner than human hairs with powerful lasers to enable the detection of twisted molecules, and the applications could improve pharmaceutical design, telecommunications and nanorobotics. (2017-04-03)

Beyond graphene: Advances make reduced graphene oxide electronics feasible
Researchers have developed a technique for converting positively charged (p-type) reduced graphene oxide (rGO) into negatively charged (n-type) rGO, creating a layered material that can be used to develop rGO-based transistors for use in electronic devices. (2017-03-30)

Painting fingernails with silver and gold
Since ancient times, people have used lustrous silver, platinum and gold to make jewelry and other adornments. Researchers have now developed a new way to add the metals to nail polish with minimal additives, resulting in durable, tinted -- and potentially antibacterial -- nail coloring. They report their method in ACS' journal Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research. (2017-03-29)

NASA laser communications to provide Orion faster connections
NASA is working to forever change the way astronauts communicate to and from space using an advanced laser communications system called LEMNOS, which will enable exponentially faster connections than ever before. (2017-03-29)

Researchers shoot for success with simulations of laser pulse-material interactions
University of Virginia professor Leonid Zhigilei led a team that used the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility's Titan supercomputer to gain deeper insights into laser interactions with metal surfaces. (2017-03-28)

Tracking real-time proton induced radiation chemistry in water
Proton therapy is a promising form of radiation treatment used to kill cancerous cells and effectively halt their rapid reproduction, and the fundamental understanding for it is contained in the radiation induced water chemistry that occurs immediately after the interaction. The ensuing processes are therefore a subject of considerable scientific interest. Researchers describe their work exploring this ionization with an experimental setup, with enhanced temporal resolution, in this week's Applied Physics Letters. (2017-03-27)

Group investigates how phototherapy combats neuropathic pain
Low-level laser therapy has been shown by recent studies to be a non-invasive and effective alternative for treating neuropathic pain. Recent studies helped elucidate the mechanisms behind the effect of low-level laser therapy. (2017-03-27)

Timing a space laser with a NASA-style stopwatch
To time how long it takes a pulse of laser light to travel from space to Earth and back, you need a really good stopwatch -- one that can measure within a fraction of a billionth of a second. (2017-03-27)

Laser activated gold pyramids could deliver drugs, DNA into cells without harm
The ability to deliver cargo like drugs or DNA into cells is essential for biological research and disease therapy but cell membranes are very good at defending their territory. Researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have developed a new method using gold microstructures to deliver a variety of molecules into cells with high efficiency and no lasting damage. (2017-03-23)

Where does laser energy go after being fired into plasma?
An outstanding conundrum on what happens to the laser energy after beams are fired into plasma has been solved in newly-published research at the University of Strathclyde. (2017-03-23)

New low-cost method to produce light-based lab-on-a-chip devices for fast medical tests
A new fabrication process could make it easier and less expensive to incorporate optical sensing onto lab-on-a-chip devices. These devices integrate laboratory functions onto a plastic or glass 'chip' typically no more than a few square centimeters in size, allowing automated testing in the doctor's office or various types of chemical or biological analysis with portable instruments. (2017-03-22)

NASA taking first steps toward high-speed space 'internet'
NASA is developing a trailblazing, long-term technology demonstration of what could become the high-speed internet of the sky. Laser communication offers data rates that are 10 to 100 times better than current radio-frequency systems. (2017-03-22)

Electrons used to control ultrashort laser pulses
We may soon get better insight into the microcosm and the world of electrons. Researchers at Lund University and Louisiana State University have developed a tool that makes it possible to control extreme UV light -- light with much shorter wavelengths than visible light. The new method uses strong laser pulses to direct the short bursts of light. (2017-03-21)

Controlling fast X-ray pulses with laser light
When hit by light, electrons are excited and begin to move. Ultrafast X-ray pulses may make it possible to watch the motion of these electrons as they move inside and between atoms in a material. Although scientists have gotten much better at making ultrafast X-rays in recent years, controlling them is still notoriously difficult. Researchers at Louisiana State University and Lund University in Sweden have demonstrated a new method to direct short bursts of X-ray light that uses strong laser pulses. (2017-03-21)

Piece of mind
With just an inexpensive micro-thin surgical needle and laser light, University of Utah engineers have discovered a minimally invasive, inexpensive way to take high-resolution pictures of an animal brain, a process that also could lead to a much less invasive method for humans. The team has now proven the process works on mice for the benefit of medical researchers studying neurological disorders such as depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder and aggression. (2017-03-20)

'Flying saucer' quantum dots hold secret to brighter, better lasers
By carefully controlling the size of the quantum dots, the researchers can 'tune' the frequency, or color, of the emitted light to any desired value. The ability to produce a laser of any desired frequency from a single material would give a boost to scientists looking to study diseases at the level of tissues or individual cells by offering new tools to probe biochemical reactions. They could also enable laser display projectors that would be brighter and more energy efficient than current LCD technology. (2017-03-20)

Using lasers to create ultra-short pulses
Physicists at Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have entered new territory with regard to the pulsing of electron beams. Their method could soon be used to develop electron microscopes suitable for ultra-short time scales such as needed for observing the motion of atoms. (2017-03-15)

Quantum movement of electrons in atomic layers shows potential of materials for electronics and photonics
A University of Kansas research team has observed the counterintuitive motion of electrons during experiments in KU's Ultrafast Laser Lab. Because this sort of 'quantum' transport is very efficient, it could play a key role in a new type of manmade material that could be used someday in solar cells and electronics. (2017-03-15)

Imaging at the speed of light
Over the past few years, Chunlei Guo and his research team at the University of Rochester have used lasers to manipulate the properties of target materials and make them, for instance, superhydrophilic or superhydrophobic. Now the team has developed a technique to visualize, for the first time, the complete evolution of micro- and nanoscale structural formation on a material's surface both during and after the application of a laser pulse. (2017-03-14)

Ultrashort light pulses for fast 'lightwave' computers
Extremely short, configurable 'femtosecond' pulses of light demonstrated by an international team could lead to future computers that run up to 100,000 times faster than today's electronics. (2017-03-13)

New application of the selective laser melting method
Scientists of Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University (SPbPU) and Delft University of Technology developed a technology for obtaining new metal structures by selective laser melting method (additive technology of manufacturing three-dimensional objects from metal powders). New technology makes it possible to obtain a gradient microstructure of the material and create a product, combining properties of two metals. This material is characterized by high performance characteristics, such as temperature and pressure effects, strength, durability. (2017-03-10)

NASA's aerial survey of polar ice expands its Arctic reach
For the past eight years, Operation IceBridge, a NASA mission that conducts aerial surveys of polar ice, has produced unprecedented three-dimensional views of Arctic and Antarctic ice sheets, providing scientists with valuable data on how polar ice is changing in a warming world. Now, for the first time, the campaign will expand its reach to explore the Arctic's Eurasian Basin through two research flights based out of Svalbard, a Norwegian archipelago in the northern Atlantic Ocean. (2017-03-10)

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