Current Law Enforcement News and Events

Current Law Enforcement News and Events, Law Enforcement News Articles.
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Sexual harassment claims considered more credible if made by 'prototypical' women
A new UW-led study reveals people's perceptions that sexual harassment primarily affects young, feminine and conventionally attractive women. Women who fall outside that prototype not only are perceived as unharmed by harassment, but also have a harder time convincing others that they have been harassed. (2021-01-14)

Sexual harassment claims by less feminine women perceived as less credible
Women who do not fit female stereotypes are less likely to be seen as victims of sexual harassment, and if they claim they were harassed, they are less likely to be believed, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. (2021-01-14)

Potential jurors favor use of artificial intelligence in precision medicine
Physicians who follow artificial intelligence (AI) advice may be considered less liable for medical malpractice than is commonly thought, according to a new study of potential jury candidates in the U.S. Published in the January issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine (JNM). The study provides the first data related to physicians' potential liability for using AI in personalized medicine, which can often deviate from standard care. (2021-01-11)

Progress made on youth drowning in Aust, NZ, Canada - but more work required
Ten years of data from Australia, New Zealand and Canada reveals a drop in drowning deaths among people under 20 - but a large increase in drowning for adolescent females and First Nations peoples. (2021-01-11)

Child marriage is legal and persists across Canada
Canada is at the forefront of global efforts to end child marriage abroad. Yet this practice remains legal and persists across the country. In Canada, more than 3,600 marriage certificates were issued to children, usually girls, under the age of 18 between 2000 and 2018, according to a new study from researchers at McGill University. In recent years, an increasing number of child marriages have been common-law unions. (2021-01-08)

Accelerating AI computing to the speed of light
A University of Washington-led team has come up with a system that could help speed up AI performance and find ways to reduce its energy consumption: an optical computing core prototype that uses phase-change material. (2021-01-08)

Elephant ivory continues to be disguised and sold on eBay
Research from the University of Kent's Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology (DICE) has found that elephant ivory is still being sold on the online marketplace eBay, despite its 10-year-old policy banning the trade in ivory. (2021-01-04)

State laws promoting flu vaccination for hospital workers may help prevent deaths from flu and pneum
Research suggests that state laws promoting influenza vaccination for hospital workers can be effective in preventing deaths from pneumonia and influenza, particularly among the elderly. Findings from a quasi-experimental observational study are published in Annals of Internal Medicine. (2021-01-04)

Carotid physiology, neck restraints in law enforcement
This Viewpoint reviews the potential neurologic consequences of any restriction of blood flow or oxygen to the brain and calls for an examination of the safety and appropriateness of the use of neck restraints by law enforcement. (2020-12-28)

Neurologists say there is no medical justification for police use of neck restraints
A number of Americans have died during encounters with police officers who used chokeholds and other forms of neck restraint. Neurologist argue that some police departments justify use of these tactics with misleading language and that the use of neck restraints has no medical justification. (2020-12-28)

Researchers develop new way to break reciprocity law
The breakthrough makes a significant step forward in photonics and microwave technology by eliminating the need for bulky magnets. (2020-12-23)

Voluntary or compulsory? New evidence on motivation for anti-COVID-19 policies
A study by the University of Konstanz shows that voluntary motivation to comply with anti-Covid-19 policies is relatively high in Germany, but can be undermined by enforcement -- the consequence of this finding differs depending on the policy. (2020-12-22)

A community-level intervention reduces alcohol-related crashes
New research from the Prevention Research Center of the Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation shows that a community-level alcohol intervention in California resulted in a 17% reduction in alcohol-involved crashes among drivers aged 15-30. (2020-12-20)

Pandemic fears driving firearm purchases
Stress related to the coronavirus pandemic and the uncertainty of what the future holds is motivating people to purchase firearms, a trend that may be more prevalent in those who already own firearms, according to a Rutgers study. (2020-12-16)

Changes in outpatient buprenorphine dispensing during COVID-19 pandemic
Outpatient buprenorphine dispensing patterns in Texas before and after the Drug Enforcement Administration temporarily relaxed outpatient buprenorphine prescribing regulations in March 2020 in response to the COVID-19 pandemic were examined in this study. (2020-12-15)

Researchers turn DNA detectives to aid rhino poaching prosecutions with forensic evidence
Researchers at the Wildlife Institute of India (WII), have, for the first time, used unique DNA markers to provide forensic evidence for alleged poaching cases involving the Indian rhino. (2020-12-15)

Police investigators of online child abuse at risk of mental harm
Researchers at the University of Portsmouth and Solent University explored moral injury amongst child exploitation investigators and interviewed police officers from two Constabularies during a year-long study. The CREST (Centre for Research and Evidence on Security Threats) funded project asked questions relating to motivations for beginning the role, any personality changes, prior trauma, difficulties relating to their current role, coping mechanisms, moral decision making and use of professional support. (2020-12-10)

What are schools doing to feed students during COVID-19-related closures?
As schools across the United States are grappling with remote and hybrid learning due to the COVID-19 pandemic, a new study in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, published by Elsevier, investigates the initial responses of child nutrition administrative agencies in all 50 US states and the District of Columbia (DC), five US territories, and the US Department of Interior Bureau of Indian Education (BIE). (2020-12-08)

Seizing military weapons does not increase violent crime nor risk police safety
More local law enforcement agencies are using military equipment, such as tear gas, armored vehicles and rubber bullets, to handle social justice protests--calling into question police militarization. (2020-12-07)

New study findings: militarizing local police does not reduce crime
New research shows that the militarization of local law enforcement through weapons, armored vehicles, combat attire, office equipment and other items provided by the Department of Defense does not reduce crime. Additionally, researchers found incomplete records and discrepancies in the federal government's tracking of surplus military equipment, or SME, issued to local law enforcement agencies. (2020-12-07)

Undocumented immigrants far less likely to commit crimes in U.S. than citizens
Crime rates among undocumented immigrants are just a fraction of those of their U.S.-born neighbors, according to a first-of-its-kind analysis of Texas arrest and conviction records. (2020-12-07)

Research concluding noncompetes stifle workers forthcoming in multiple publications
The University of Maryland's Evan Starr has extensively studied noncompetes, with the same conclusion: the agreements hurt workers. (2020-12-07)

Immunity passports: Ethical conflict and opportunity
Ikerbasque Research Professor IƱigo de Miguel Beriain, who works with the UPV/EHU Chair in Law and the Human Genome, defends the usefulness of immunity passports, providing they are used to protect the rights of those who are immune. He also warns that vaccine distribution will create similar problems related to immunity-based licenses. (2020-12-04)

Most countries are violating international law during the COVID-19 pandemic: Legal experts
In 2019, the Global Health Law Consortium, hosted at York U, analyzed key aspects of the International Health Regulations (IHR) to authoritatively interpret what countries are legally allowed to do during public health crises like Ebola & SARS. This work became even more relevant when COVID-19 began spreading around the world early this year; the Consortium members reviewed how countries reacted to the outbreak based on the IHRs that legally bind 196 countries (2020-12-03)

How a police contact by middle school leads to different outcomes for Black, white youth
A new University of Washington study finds that Black youth are more likely than white youth to be treated as 'usual suspects' after a first encounter with police, leading to subsequent arrests over time. Even as white young adults report engaging in significantly more illegal behavior, Black young adults face more criminal penalties. (2020-12-03)

The (un)social network: The emergence of digital thought clones and what to do about them
A groundbreaking study published in Information & Communications Technology Law by experts at the Centre for Law and Development at Qatar University discusses the legal and ethical implications of Big Tech's development of ''digital thought clones.'' Digital thought clones can allow technology companies to accurately predict and influence people's behavior according to their digital habits. The authors call for legislation to protect people from technology companies' malicious use of their digital footprint. (2020-12-01)

COVID-19 amplifies inequalities in healthcare access for ethnic minority and migrant women
In their recent research paper, published in the Feminist Legal Studies journal, City, University of London's Dr Sabrina Germain and Dr Adrienne Yong say existing barriers to medical care for these marginalised women have been intensified by the pandemic, and must be examined so as to understand their poorer health outcomes. (2020-11-27)

Black, Hispanic adolescents significantly more likely to die by police intervention than whites
A recent study evaluating the use of force by police against children found that Black and Hispanic adolescents are significantly more likely to die from shootings related to police intervention compared to non-Hispanic white adolescents. The findings, led by Children's National Hospital researchers and reported online Nov. 24 in Pediatrics, mirror similar racial and ethnic disparities in adults and highlight the need for interventions and policies to mitigate these tragedies. (2020-11-24)

Stirling research evaluates effectiveness of conservation efforts
New research from the University of Stirling into the effectiveness of international conservation projects could help to save endangered species from extinction. (2020-11-23)

Pharmacy dropboxes can help improve proper drug disposal, PSU study finds
Drug take-back boxes are a safe and secure way to dispose of unwanted medications, but a new Portland State University study shows awareness of these dropboxes as well as knowledge about risks of improper disposal remain low. (2020-11-16)

Center for Justice Research Police Reform Action Brief: Ban chokeholds
A chokehold ban will help move this country further toward the elimination of racially-motivated police violence and the longstanding tensions/distrust between minority communities and the police. (2020-11-16)

People in developing countries eat less bushmeat as they migrate from rural to urban areas
New Princeton University research finds that when people in developing countries move from rural areas to cities, they consume less bushmeat over time, perhaps because other sources of animal protein are more readily available (2020-11-16)

Repeated small blasts put military, law enforcement at risk for brain injury
Military and law-enforcement personnel repeatedly exposed to low-level blasts have significant brain changes - including an increased level of brain injury and inflammation -- compared with a control group, a new study has found. (2020-11-12)

Calls to city 311 lines can predict opioid overdose hotspots
Service requests to city non-emergency telephone lines can help identify 'hotspots' for opioid use and overdoses, a study in Columbus found. Researchers found that calls to the 311 line - used in many cities across the United States to report non-emergency issues - tracked closely to places and times in Columbus in which opioid overdose events were on the rise. (2020-11-11)

Conservatives and liberals motivated by different psychological factors, new study shows
Liberalism and conservatism are associated with qualitatively different psychological concerns, notably those linked to morality, shows a new study that explores how political ideology and moral values are connected to motivated social cognition. (2020-11-11)

Trauma hospitalizations fall in Philly during COVID-19 lockdown, but gun violence rises
Non-intentional trauma fell compared to the period before COVID this year, but ratios of gun violence patients increased after stay-at-home orders were implemented, and were high compared to the same timeframe in previous years. (2020-11-09)

Improving the Endangered Species Act requires more than rule reversal
Although species are disappearing at an alarming rate worldwide, the Trump administration recently finalized a series of substantial changes to the regulations that underpin the U.S. Endangered Species Act (ESA), several of which effectively undermine species conservation. (2020-11-05)

After election: making the endangered species act more effective
Following the presidential election, a leading group of scientists are making the case that a 'rule reversal' will not be sufficient to allow the Endangered Species Act to do its job. Instead, they're calling for deeper improvements to the rules federal wildlife agencies use to apply the law--aiming to make the Act more effective and to gain bipartisan and industry support in an era of accelerating climate change. (2020-11-05)

Large-scale study: Congolese fishermen report decline in fish stocks on Lake Tanganyika
Fishermen working on Lake Tanganyika in eastern Congo experience a lack of safety and want better enforcement of existing regulations. They also report a decline in the lake's fish stocks. These are some of the findings of a large international study led by KU Leuven (Belgium) based on 1018 interviews with stakeholders in the area. The study was published in the Journal of Great Lakes Research. (2020-11-04)

Brain effects of repetitive low-level occupational blast exposure
Military and law enforcement personnel with extensive occupational blast exposure had statistically significant differences in brain imaging measures compared to nonexposed control personnel (2020-11-03)

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