Current Leukaemia News and Events

Current Leukaemia News and Events, Leukaemia News Articles.
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Antitumoral effects of LXR activation
Tumor cells are able to avoid the attack of the immune system through several mechanisms. For instance, these can secrete factors that turn macrophages -cells in the immune system- into dual action agents that contribute to the tumor progress and will protect it from immune body defences: these become, thus, the tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). (2021-02-12)

Cancer research reveals how mutations in a specific gene cause different types of disease
Leading cancer expert solve long-standing question of how various types of mutations in just one gene cause different types of diseases (2021-01-14)

Ibrutinib with rituximab in previously untreated CLL: indication of added benefit over FCR
Ibrutinib with rituximab in previously untreated CLL: indication of added benefit over FCR. The new drug combination prolongs overall survival in patients in good general health. No study data are available for other patient groups. (2021-01-05)

Cells resistant to treatment already present before diagnosis of adult leukaemia
This work is a collaboration between Núria López-Bigas' lab at IRB Barcelona and the groups headed by Anna Bigas (Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute) and Josep Maria Ribera (Josep Carreras Leukaemia Research Institute). The results have been published in Genome Biology. (2020-12-16)

Study finds paediatric cancer patients at no greater risk of severe COVID-19 infection
Children with cancer who test positive for COVID-19 do not appear to be at an increased risk of severe COVID-19 infection compared to healthy children, according a new UK study. (2020-12-14)

New analysis method for predicting the risks and effects of immunotherapy
In a new study, researchers at Uppsala University have been able to show differences in how Rituximab, a monoclonal antibody drug, interacts with the blood of healthy individuals compared to patients with chronic lymphatic leukaemia. This has awakened hopes that this analysis method could pave the way for important breakthroughs in immunotherapy research and treatment. (2020-12-11)

Hematoxylin as a killer of CALR mutant cancer cells
Patients with myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) often have a carcinogenic mutated form of the calreticulin gene (CALR). Scientists of the research group of Robert Kralovics, Adjunct Principal Investigator at CeMM and group leader at the Medical University of Vienna, have now identified hematoxylin as a novel CALR inhibitor. The study, published in the renowned journal Blood, shows how hematoxylin compounds affect a specific domain of CALR and selectively kill those CALR mutant cells. The discovery has enormous therapeutic potential and gives hope for new treatment options. (2020-12-10)

Birth defects linked to greater risk of cancer in later life
People born with major birth defects face a higher risk of cancer throughout life, although the relative risk is greatest in childhood and then declines, finds a study published by The BMJ today. (2020-12-02)

Stem cell transplantation: undesirable rejection mechanism identified
In the treatment of leukaemia, stem cell transplantation subsequent to chemotherapy and radiation can often engender severe adverse inflammatory reactions - especially in the skin or in the gut, since these so-called barrier organs are more frequently affected. Up until now, the reason for this was unclear. A team of researchers in Vienna has now identified an immune mechanism that is partially responsible for this. (2020-11-19)

Existing antidepressant helps to inhibit growth of cancer cells in lab animals
New research has shown that the antidepressant sertraline helps to inhibit the growth of cancer cells. The substance acts on a metabolic addiction that allows different types of cancer to grow. This is shown by a study on cell cultures and lab animals by researchers at KU Leuven. (2020-11-17)

Singapore scientists identify potential new biomarker to better personalize cancer therapy
Testing for mutations in RNF43, a protein that affects key cancer cell-growth pathway Wnt, gives clinicians actionable insights to tailor treatments better. (2020-11-13)

The natural artistry of disease: a wintry landscape in the eye
Researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) report a case of frosted branch angiitis in a woman presenting years after being treated for leukemia-lymphoma with allogeneic human stem cell transplant. The relevance of this ocular finding is discussed and its value as an early warning sign of immune activation following therapeutic immunological interventions is highlighted. (2020-11-09)

One mouse at a time: new approach to testing potential drugs for children's cancers
Researchers have developed a way of testing potential drugs for children's cancers so as to take account of the wide genetic diversity of these diseases. instead of conventional testing designs, which use multiple mice as models for rare children's cancers, analysis had revealed that it was possible to evaluate them on a single mouse, which could accelerate the development of better treatments. The research is presented at the 32th EORTC-NCI-AACR Symposium on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics. (2020-10-21)

'Multi-omics' adds new cell to immune family tree
Australian researchers have used powerful 'single cell multi-omics' technologies to discover a previously unknown ancestor of T and B lymphocytes, which are critical components of our immune system. (2020-10-19)

The CNIO reprograms CRISPR system in mice to eliminate tumor cells without affecting healthy cells
CNIO researchers destroyed Ewing's sarcoma and chronic myeloid leukaemia tumor cells by using CRISPR to cut out the fusion genes that cause them. For the first time, fusion genes have been selectively and efficiently removed using CRISPR. These genes are attracting a great deal of interest from the research community because they are unique to the tumor cell and are therefore excellent targets for the development of future drugs that only attack the tumor and are harmless for healthy cells. (2020-10-08)

An area of the brain where tumor cells shelter from chemotherapy in childhood leukaemia
Sometimes, the central nervous system harbours tumour cells that elude treatment and thus become one of the main sources of relapse. Research led by the Complutense University of Madrid has identified one of these locations in which the cells remain protected: the stroma of the choroid plexus, a structure in the brain ventricles responsible for the production of cerebrospinal fluid. (2020-09-25)

Feline leukaemia virus infection: A clinical and epidemiological enigma
Feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) is a gammaretrovirus that occurs worldwide in domestic cats, as well as small wild cats. It is associated with various serious, and sometimes fatal, diseases including anaemia, immunosuppression and certain cancers. (2020-09-09)

Fighting cardiovascular disease with acne drug
Researchers from the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Heidelberg and Stanford University have found the cause of dilated cardiomyopathy - a leading cause of heart failure - and identified a potential treatment for it: a drug already used to treat acne. The study was published on 8 September in Cell Reports. (2020-09-08)

Study finds cancer mapping may solve puzzle of regional disease links
New statistical analysis finds cancer mapping may help question regional disease links. (2020-08-13)

A cancer mystery of more than 40 years ago is solved thanks to epigenetics
In an article that was just published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) by the group of Dr. Manel Esteller, Director of the Josep Carreras Leukaemia Research Institute, ICREA Research Professor and Professor of Genetics at the University of Barcelona is solved this mystery by describing that in cancer cells the protein that generates the nucleotide ''Y'' is epigenetically inactivated, causing small but highly aggressive tumors. (2020-08-12)

Identified gene mutations impact on the severity of a type of hematologic cancer
Researchers from Josep Carreras Leukemia Research Institute participate in an international study that confirms for the first time that mutation of the two TP53 gene's copies is associated with a worse prognosis in myelodysplastic syndromes, a group of blood cancers a more frequent in elderly population. The results of this study have been published in Nature Medicine journal and represent an advance in the diagnosis and treatment of this type of hematological cancer. (2020-08-04)

Cell competition in the thymus is crucial in a healthy organism
The study published in Cell Reports demonstrates that the development of T lymphocytes lays on the coordination of signals followed by cells in order to ensure the maintenance of a healthy organism. The cells identified in the study integrate information regarding the needs of more mature cells and define their own development accordingly: adjusting the speed of the production of T lymphocytes and purging the system of other less efficient cells, that tend to cause leukemia. (2020-07-30)

Identified a new regulatory mechanism of response to metabolic stress
The Chromatin Biology group, led by Dr. Alex Vaquero has identified a new enzymatic activity in SIRT7, involved in stress response, aging and hematopoiesis, which plays a key role in metabolic stress and aging. (2020-07-27)

Breakthrough with cancer vaccine
Scientists have developed a new cancer vaccine with the potential to activate the body's immune system to fight a range of cancers, including leukaemia, breast cancer, lung cancer and pancreatic cancers. (2020-07-09)

A new nanoconjugate blocks acute myeloid leukemia tumor cells without harming healthy ones
The nanoparticle targets only leukemic cells and therefore would reduce the severe adverse effects of current treatments. The receptor for this nanoparticle is expressed in 20 types of cancer and associated with a poor prognosis, so this drug could open a new therapeutic pathway for other tumors. (2020-07-09)

Mapping the immune landscape of haematological cancers may help to enhance therapies
Activating the immune system of the body is a promising form of treatment for cancer. Researchers at the University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital as well as the University of Eastern Finland mapped out the immune landscape of haematological malignancies in a dataset covering more than 10,000 patients to identify drug targets and patient groups which could potentially benefit from immunotherapies. (2020-07-09)

Identified the genetic landscape of myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms
Researchers from the MDS Group of the Josep Carreras Leukaemia Research Institute and the Munich Leukemia Laboratory map the mutations that can ease and accelerate the diagnosis of Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms rare malignancies. (2020-07-01)

Loss of intestinal goblet cells causes fatal disease after stem cell transplantation
Allogeneic stem cell transplantation can cause a loss of protective goblet cells from the colon's inner lining, which can be fatal. But boosting those cells beforehand could improve the outcome. (2020-07-01)

Decades old mystery in leukaemia treatment solved
A research team led by the University of Kent and Goethe-University Frankfurt am Main, has solved an almost 40-year old mystery in leukaemia therapy and the drug nelarabine, thanks to studying levels of enzyme SAMHD1. (2020-06-25)

Treating leukaemia more effectively
Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) is the most common kind of cancer in children. T-ALL, a subtype that resembles T-lymphocytes, can be treated successfully with the drug nelarabine. The drug has not been successful, however, with B-ALL, a subtype resembling B-lymphocytes. This has puzzled oncologists sinced the 1980's. Now, an international research team headed by Goethe University and the University of Kent has discovered the reason: B-ALL cells contain the enzyme SAMHD1, which deactivates the drug. (2020-06-24)

Starved cancer cells became more sensitive to chemotherapy
By preventing sugar uptake, researchers succeeded in increasing the cancer cells' sensitivity to chemotherapeutic treatment. The studies, led by researchers at Lund University in Sweden, were carried out on cancer cells in a lab environment. The results were recently published in the research journal Haematologica. (2020-06-23)

Targeting stem cells: The path to curing poor-prognosis leukaemia
Researchers have been investigating what they believe to be the root cause of treatment resistance, leukaemia stem cells, and have now hit upon a new therapeutic approach that works by targeting these cells. (2020-06-18)

First epigenetic study in 3D human cancer cells
The researcher Manel Esteller performs the first massive epigenetic characterization in organoids or 3D cancer cultures and makes the data available to the research community to facilitate new findings on tumor development and progression. (2020-05-13)

Cancer research breakthrough as DNA behavior is uncovered in 3D models
Scientists have used 3D models to break down the DNA behavior of cancer cells, in a breakthrough new study which could revolutionize treatment for the disease. (2020-05-10)

Researchers in Singapore find common therapeutic vulnerability for a genetically diverse and deadly
Scientists and clinicians from Duke-NUS Medical School, the Agency for Science, Technology and Research's (A*STAR's) Genome Institute of Singapore (GIS), and the Singapore General Hospital (SGH), have devised a novel drug combination that could treat a particularly deadly form of leukaemia, known as blast crisis (BC) chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML). The team has also developed strategies that may identify patients with early stage or chronic phase (CP) CML who are at increased risk of developing BC, and potentially preventing disease progression. (2020-03-18)

Possible treatment for breast cancer patients could roll out to clinical trial immediately
A worldwide collaborative study involving scientists at the University of Sussex has proposed a new treatment strategy for patients with a rare but aggressive subtype of cancer known as triple negative breast cancer. (2020-03-10)

Scientists discover how rogue communications between cells lead to leukemia
New research has deciphered how rogue communications in blood stem cells can cause leukemia. The discovery could pave the way for new, targeted medical treatments that block this process. (2020-02-06)

Suspect eliminated as a therapeutic target in B cell lymphoma
Australian researchers have narrowed the focus on which survival proteins are important for the survival of B cell lymphomas, eliminating the protein BCL-W from the 'suspect list'. The discovery upends earlier speculation that BCL-W could be an important survival factor for B cell lymphomas, and will focus future research efforts on more important targets. (2020-02-04)

Revealed an alteration related to the loss of effectiveness of a treatment in lung cancer
Researchers from IJC reveal that non-smoking patients with lung cancer that have an alteration in RB1 and are treated with EGFR inhibitors, acquire resistance to treatment through the mechanism of histopathological transformation, either to non-small cell lung cancer (SCLC) or SLCL combined with a transformation to squamous cell lung cancer. (2020-01-23)

Drug profiling and gene scissors open new avenues in immunotherapy
Researchers have discovered ways to boost CAR T-cell therapy. (2020-01-21)

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