Current Limestone News and Events

Current Limestone News and Events, Limestone News Articles.
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'Virtual anatomy' imaging yields new insight into ancient platypus fish
The inner ear of a 400 million-year-old 'platypus fish' has yielded new insights into early vertebrate evolution, suggesting this ancient creature may be more closely related to modern-day sharks and bony fish than previously thought. (2021-01-27)

600-year-old marine sponge holds centuries-old climate records
Scientists used a 600-year-old marine sponge to reconstruct a record of ocean temperature in the North Atlantic revealing past volcanic activity as well as the current global warming trend from the release of carbon dioxide and other heat trapping gasses into Earth's atmosphere and absorbed by the oceans. (2021-01-13)

Prehistoric 'sea dragon' discovered on English Channel Coast is identified as new species
A mysterious small marine reptile dating from 150 million years ago has been identified as a new species that may have been capable of diving very deeply. The well-preserved specimen was found in a Late Jurassic deep marine deposit along the English Channel coastline in Dorset, England. (2020-12-09)

New 'sea dragon' discovered off UK coastline
An amateur fossil hunter has unearthed a new type of prehistoric 'sea dragon' on the beach of the UK's Dorset coast. (2020-12-09)

First-known fossil iguana burrow found in the Bahamas
The fossilized burrow dates back to the Late Pleistocene Epoch, about 115,000 years ago, and is located on the island of San Salvador -- best known as the likely spot where Christopher Columbus made his first landfall in his 1492 voyage. (2020-12-09)

Earthquake lightning: Mysterious luminescence phenomena
Photoemission induced by rock fracturing can occur as a result of landslides associated with earthquakes. Factors involved in such earthquake lightnings were studied with granite, rhyolite, pyroclastic rock and limestone. (2020-09-28)

How do stone forests get their spikes? New research offers pointed answer
A team of scientists has now shed new light on how stone forests and other natural structures are created. Its research also offers promise for the manufacturing of sharp-tipped structures, such as the micro-needles and probes needed for scientific research and medical procedures. (2020-09-07)

Aboriginal rock art, frontier conflict and a swastika
A hidden Murray River rockshelter speaks volumes about local Aboriginal and European settlement in the Riverland, with symbols of conflict -- including a swastika symbol -- discovered in Aboriginal rock art. The engravings studied in 188 engravings in a remote South Australian rockshelter are a stark reminder of colonial invasion and the strife brewing in Europe ahead of World War Two, Flinders University archaeologists have revealed. (2020-05-18)

Chemical composition of bedrock limits vegetation growth in karst regions, research shows
Scientists have revealed the critical role that the chemical composition of bedrock plays in limiting vegetation growth in some of the world's most barren and rocky terrains. (2020-05-13)

Giant teenage shark from the Dinosaur-era
Scientists of the University of Vienna examined parts of a vertebral column, which was found in northern Spain in 1996, and assigned it to the extinct shark group Ptychodontidae. In contrast to teeth, shark vertebrae bear biological information, like body size, growth, and age and allowed the team surrounding Patrick L. Jambura to gain new insights into the biology of this mysterious shark group. (2020-04-23)

Peak district grasslands hold key to global plant diversity
Scientists at the University of Sheffield have found that plants are able to co-exist because they share key nutrients, using grasslands from the Peak District. (2020-03-23)

Drones can now scan terrain and excavations without human intervention
Drones can now scan terrain and excavations without human intervention. New research from Aarhus University has allowed artificial intelligence to take over the human-controlled drones currently being used for the task. The algorithm also predicts and counteracts the wind forces acting on the drone body. (2020-03-05)

Modern technology reveals old secrets about the great, white Maya road
The first lidar study of the 100-kilometer stone highway that connected the ancient cities of Cobá and Yaxuná on the Yucatan Peninsula 13 centuries ago may shed light on the intentions of Lady K'awiil Ajaw, the warrior queen who University of Miami anthropologist Traci Ardren believes commissioned its construction at the turn of the 7th century. (2020-02-24)

Tiny, ancient meteorites suggest early Earth's atmosphere was rich in carbon dioxide
Tiny meteorites that fell to Earth 2.7 billion years ago suggest that the atmosphere at that time was high in carbon dioxide, which agrees with current understanding of how our planet's atmospheric gases changed over time. (2020-01-24)

Cave fights for food: Voracious spiders vs. assassin bugs
Killing and eating of potential competitors has rarely been documented in the zoological literature, even though this type of interaction can affect population dynamics. In a recent publication in the open-access journal Subterranean Biology, Brazilian scientists presented their notes regarding the predation of an assassin bug by a spider in neotropical caves. Underground, where food resources are scarce, such events might be possible as a result of ecological pressures imposed by the hostile environment, hypothesize the researchers. (2020-01-20)

Paleontologists identify new group of pterosaurs
New research suggests that ancient flying reptiles known as pterosaurs were much more diverse than originally thought, according to a new study by an international group of paleontologists including scientists at the University of Alberta and the Museu Nacional in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (2019-11-29)

Scientists have developed environmentally friendly way to build up road foundations
Scientists of Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) and the Federal University of Technology -- Paraná/Brazil together with colleagues from Kazakhstan have proposed to build road foundations from a mixture of loam, metal slag and lime waste instead of traditional layers of natural sand and gravel. The new composite is durable, water and frost resistant, meeting the requirements for building materials of the first class. A related article is available in the Journal of Cleaner Production. (2019-11-29)

New Alzheimer risk gene discovered
A new paper in the Journal of Neuropathology & Experimental Neurology finds a gene that may help explain a large part of the genetic risk for developing Alzheimer disease. (2019-11-21)

Concrete with improved impact endurance for defense structures developed at FEFU
Engineers from the Military Studies Center at Far Eastern Federal University (MSC FEFU) developed a brand-new concrete with improved impact endurance and up to 40% made of waste: rice husk cinder, limestone crushing waste, and siliceous sand. The new concrete is 6-9 times more crackle resistant than the types produced under GOST standards. The related article was published in Inorganic Materials: Applied Research. (2019-10-30)

The earliest well-preserved tetrapod may never have left the water
Superbly preserved fossils from Russia, excavated with support of a grant from the National Geographic Society and described today by an international team in the leading scientific journal Nature, cast new and surprising light on one of the earliest tetrapods -- the group of animals that made the evolutionary transition from water to land and ultimately became the ancestors not just of amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals, but of ourselves. (2019-10-23)

Do animals control earth's oxygen level?
For the first time, researchers have measured how the production of algae and the Earth's oxygen level affect each other -- what you might call 'Earth's heartbeat'. Studies of 540 million-year-old limestone indicate that it is not just the oxygen level that affects animals, but that animals can indeed regulate the oxygen level. (2019-09-10)

Calcium: Good for bones, good for cultural conservation
When it comes to cultural heritage sites, there are few things historians wouldn't do to preserve them for future generations. In particular, stone buildings and sculptures made of plaster and marble are increasingly at risk of damage from air pollution, acid rain and other factors. Researchers now report in ACS Applied Nano Materials a new, calcium-based conservation treatment inspired by nature that overcomes many drawbacks of currently used methods.  (2019-08-07)

Nuclear physics in search of world artifacts
NUST MISIS scientists together with the colleagues from PN Lebedev Physical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics Lomonosov Moscow State University and Dagestan State University have published the first results of a 'scan' obtained by the method of muon radiography of the underground space in the Derbent fortress of Naryn-Kala. (2019-07-10)

New species of rock-eating shipworm identified in freshwater river in the Philippines
A newly identified genus and species of worm-like, freshwater clam, commonly known as a shipworm, eats rock and expels sand as scat while it burrows like an ecosystem engineer in the Abatan River in the Philippines. (2019-06-19)

Cement as a climate killer: Using industrial waste to produce carbon neutral alternatives
Producing cement takes a big toll on our climate: Around eight per cent of annual global carbon dioxide emissions can be attributed to this process. However, the demand for cement continues to rise. A team of geoscientists from Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) has found a way to produce more environmentally friendly and sustainable alternatives. In the journal ''Construction and Building Materials'' they describe how industrial residues can be used to produce high-quality, climate-friendly materials. (2019-05-20)

Oxygen variation controls episodic pattern of Cambrian explosion: study
A multidisciplinary study, published on May 6, 2019 in Nature Geoscience by a joint China-UK-Russia research team, gives strong support to the hypothesis that the oxygen content of the atmosphere and ocean was the principal controlling factor in early animal evolution. (2019-05-07)

Are no-fun fungi keeping fertilizer from plants?
Research explores soil, fungi, phosphorus dynamics. (2019-03-27)

Bristol undergraduate reconstructs the skulls of 2 species of ancient reptile
Using two partially fragmented fossil skulls, a student at the University of Bristol has digitally reconstructed, in three-dimensions, the skulls of two species of ancient reptile that lived in the Late Triassic, one of which had been previously known only from its jaws. (2019-02-25)

Ice Age survivors or stranded travellers? A new subterranean species discovered in Canada
The discovery of a new to science species of rare and primitive arthropod in a cave that was covered by a thick ice sheet until recently is certain to raise questions. In their study, published in the open-access journal Subterranean Biology, entomologist Alberto Sendra and local caver Craig Wagnell describe a new species of cave-dwelling, insect-like dipluran from the island of Vancouver (Canada) and discuss its origin. (2019-02-05)

Carbon-capture technology scrubs CO2 from power plants like scuba-diving gear
Scientists at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have developed a process that removes CO2 from coal-burning power plant emissions in a way that is similar to how soda lime works in scuba diving rebreathers. Their research, published Jan. 31 in the journal Chem, offers an alternative but simpler strategy for carbon capture and requires 24 percent less energy than industrial benchmark solutions. (2019-01-31)

New family of fungi threatens a UNESCO-listed 8-century-old cathedral in Portugal
A peculiar fungus was retrieved from an artwork in the Old Cathedral of Coimbra, Portugal during a multi-disciplinary scientific survey. The organism was found to belong to the group of microcolonial black fungi, which are infamous amongst conservationists and biologists who care for historic monuments. They cause significant biodeterioration to stone monuments due to their successful adaptation to hostile environmental conditions. The findings are published in the open-access journal MycoKeys. (2019-01-28)

Microplastic contamination found in common source of groundwater, researchers report
Microplastics contaminate the world's surface waters, yet scientists have only just begun to explore their presence in groundwater systems. A new study is the first to report microplastics in fractured limestone aquifers -- a groundwater source that accounts for 25 percent of the global drinking water supply. (2019-01-25)

Fossilized slime of 100-million-year-old hagfish shakes up vertebrate family tree
Paleontologists at the University of Chicago have discovered the first detailed fossil of a hagfish, the slimy, eel-like carrion feeders of the ocean. The 100-million-year-old fossil helps answer questions about when these ancient, jawless fish branched off the evolutionary tree from the lineage that gave rise to modern-day jawed vertebrates, including bony fish and humans. (2019-01-21)

Scientists found new giant dinosaur
Paleontologists from Russia have described a new dinosaur, the Volgatitan. Seven of its vertebrae, which had remained in the ground for about 130 million years, were found on the banks of the Volga, not far from the village of Slantsevy Rudnik, five kilometers from Ulyanovsk. The study has been published in the latest issue of Biological Communications. (2018-12-06)

New species of the 'first bird' Archaeopteryx uncovered
A new species of the famous 'first bird,' Archaeopteryx, supporting its status as the transitional fossil between birds and dinosaurs, has been published by in the journal Historical Biology. (2018-10-25)

150-million-year old, piranha-like specimen is earliest known flesh-eating fish
Researchers reporting in Current Biology on Oct. 18 have described a remarkable new species of fish that lived in the sea about 150 million years ago in the time of the dinosaurs. The new species of bony fish had teeth like a piranha, which the researchers suggest they used as piranhas do: to bite off chunks of flesh from other fish. (2018-10-18)

The origins of the High Plains landscape
A mantle wave passing beneath western North America over the last 20 million years is responsible for the formation of the High Plains landscape at the base of the Rocky Mountains. These plains provide vital habitat for millions of migratory birds and farmland essential to US agriculture. ETH geologist Sean Willett and his colleagues from the University of Nevada have been studying the origins of this extraordinary landscape. (2018-09-26)

Mapping blue carbon in mangroves worldwide
Mangroves are tropical forests that thrive in salt water and found in a variety of coastal settings worldwide. Mangroves store greater amounts of carbon than any other terrestrial ecosystem, which helps reduce carbon dioxide and greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. When carbon is stored in the ocean or coastal ecosystems, it is called blue carbon. However, a more precise estimate of how much blue carbon is stored by mangroves has not been available until recently. (2018-08-02)

How mangroves help keep the planet cool
In a new global framework, scientists have developed a more accurate assessment of how mangroves store carbon in their soil. The researchers found that previous studies have underestimated the blue carbon levels in mangroves by up to 50 percent in some regions and overestimated levels by up to 86 percent in others. This study published recently in Nature Climate Change will help countries develop and evaluate their carbon footprint and blue carbon inventory that potentially can be used in the global marketplace. (2018-07-02)

What caused the mass extinction of Earth's first animals?
Fossil records tell us that the first macroscopic animals appeared on Earth about 575 million years ago. Twenty-four million years later, the diversity of animals began to mysteriously decline, leading to Earth's first know mass extinction event. A research team, led by scientists from Arizona State University, is helping to unravel this mystery and understand why this extinction event happened, what it can tell us about our origins, and how the world as we know it came to be. (2018-06-26)

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