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Current Limestone News and Events, Limestone News Articles.
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Boring barnacles prefer the shallow life on coral reefs
Scientists at Rice University, the University of the Virgin Islands and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration combine efforts to quantify how barnacles infest stony coral over a variety of conditions and reduce calcium carbonate on reefs. Coral reefs harbor diverse marine life and help prevent coastal erosion. (2018-06-20)

Old Man River's unique chemical signature
Human activity greatly impacts the natural chemistry of the largest river in North America -- the Mississippi River. In a new, large-scale study, geologists at Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge have identified a unique chemical signature in the river. This study was published in Environmental Science & Technology. (2018-06-13)

UNM scientists find widespread ocean anoxia as cause for past mass extinction
For decades, scientists have conducted research centered around the five major mass extinctions that have shaped the world we live in. The extinctions date back more than 450 million years with the Late Ordovician Mass Extinction to the deadliest extinction, the Late Permian extinction 250 million years ago that wiped out over 90 percent of species. (2018-05-21)

Tiny fossils unlock clues to Earth's climate half a billion years ago
Scientists from the UK and France have quantified the temperature of Earth's oceans over half a billion years ago by combining fossil data and climate models. (2018-05-09)

Mercury Rising: New evidence that volcanism triggered the late Devonian extinction
The late Devonian extinction, about 370 million years ago, is one of the 'Big Five.' It killed up to 80 percent of species, obliterating the lavish Devonian coral reef ecosystem. The final pulse in this multi-step crisis, called the Frasnian-Famennian event, was its most devastating. But what, exactly, did the killing? (2018-05-01)

If pigs could fly
Research on ungulates in the limestone forests of northern Guam has yielded surprising results. (2018-04-29)

How landscapes and landforms 'remember' or 'forget' their initial formations
Crescent dunes and meandering rivers can 'forget' their initial shapes as they are carved and reshaped by wind and water while other landforms keep a memory of their past shape, suggests a new laboratory analysis by a team of mathematicians. (2018-04-26)

Scientists found a new genus and species of frogs
A team of scientists from MSU and their foreign colleagues discovered a previously unknown species and genus of batrachians Siamophryne troglodytes. These frogs live in the only one place on Earth -- a limestone cave in Thailand. The location of the cave is not disclosed to protect the animals. The results of the study will lead to the reconsideration of evolutionary history of the relevant group of Amphibia and are valuable for systematics and conservation. (2018-03-29)

Evidence for a giant flood in the central Mediterranean Sea
Marine scientists have uncovered evidence of one of the largest floods in Earth's history in the central Mediterranean seafloor. The flood, known as the Zanclean flood, is thought to have ended the Messinian Salinity Crisis (MSC), a period during which the Mediterranean Sea became partially dried up. (2018-03-21)

The Pentagon built with mineralized microbes predating dinosaurs
A new study led by The Australian National University (ANU) has found that some of the building blocks of the Pentagon and Empire State Building were made by microbes that lived up to 340 million years ago, predating the dinosaurs. (2018-01-18)

In the footsteps of Jacques Cousteau
In 1970, Jacques Cousteau and his Team recovered an unusual stalactite from the depths of the Caribbean Sea. Now geoscientist Eberhard Gischler of Goethe University Frankfurt explains what it reveals about our climate since the last ice age. (2017-12-18)

Texas A&M-Galveston team finds cave organisms living off methane gas
In a surprising find deep in an underwater cave in Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula, a team of researchers led by a Texas A&M University at Galveston doctoral student have discovered that cave-adapted organisms can exist off of methane gas and the bacteria near it, and it raises the possibility that other life forms are also living this way in similar caves around the world. (2017-11-28)

World's longest sauropod dinosaur trackway brought to light
In 2009, the world's largest dinosaur tracks were discovered in the French village of Plagne, in the Jura Mountains. Since then, a series of excavations at the site has uncovered other tracks, sprawling over more than 150 meters. French scientists conclude these tracks were left 150 million years ago by a dinosaur at least 35 m long and weighing no less than 35 t. (2017-11-14)

Ancient life form discovered in remote Tasmanian valley
A team of Tasmanian researchers has uncovered rare, living stromatolites deep within the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area. (2017-11-13)

Finger and toe fossils belonged to tiny primates 45 million years ago
A new study identifies nearly 500 minuscule finger and toe bones as belonging to 45-million-year-old tiny primates. Many of the fossils are so small they rival the diminutive size of a mustard seed. Representing nine different taxonomic families of primates and as many as 25 species, the specimens from China include numerous fossils attributed to Eosimias, the very first anthropoid known to date, and three fossils attributed to a new and more advanced anthropoid. (2017-11-09)

Habitat restoration can maximize the benefits of marine protected areas
US researchers find that Marine Protected Areas can potentially subsidize harvested oyster populations via larval spillover -- however, these benefits can only be realized if harvested areas contain suitable habitat for larval settlement and survival. The study is one of the first to document the contribution of different habitat restoration strategies to an overall marine population. (2017-10-27)

Moment of impact: A journey into the Chicxulub Crater
When the Chicxulub asteroid slammed into Earth about 66 million years ago, it obliterated 80 percent of Earth's species, blasted out a crater 200 kilometers across, and signaled an abrupt end to the Cretaceous Period. The impact, its catastrophic effects, and its aftermath have engrossed scientists and the public alike since it was first discovered. (2017-10-23)

Soil amendments for healthier spinach
Soils keep plants healthy by providing plants with water, helpful minerals, and microbes, among other benefits. But what if the soil also contains toxic elements, such as cadmium? The solution goes back to the soil. Researchers are investigating which soil additives work best. (2017-10-04)

Algae fortifies coral reefs in past and present
The Great Barrier Reef, and most other large reefs around the world, owe their bulk in large part to a type of red algae that grows on corals and strengthens them. New research led by Anna Weiss, a Ph.D. candidate at The University of Texas at Austin Jackson School of Geosciences, has found that ancient coral reefs were also bolstered by their bond with red algae, a finding that could help scientists better understand how reefs will respond to climate change. (2017-08-28)

This week from AGU: New study details ocean's role in fourth-largest extinction
Extremely low oxygen levels in Earth's oceans could be responsible for extending the effects of a mass extinction that wiped out millions of species on Earth around 200 million years ago, according to a new study published in Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems. (2017-08-16)

Cretaceous snails conceal themselves in monuments in Madrid
The fountains standing next to the Museo del Prado are built using a sedimentary rock full of gastropod shells from the time of the dinosaurs. These fossils have revealed the origin of the stone: forgotten quarries in Redueña, in the province of Madrid, where the building material for the Fountain of Apollo and the Palacio de las Cortes also came from. (2017-08-03)

Alkaline soil, sensible sensor
Producers sometimes face challenges that go deep into the soil. They need answers to help the soil, on site. A portable field sensor can accurately measure minerals in soils more easily and efficiently than existing methods. And a research team, including a middle school student and her scientist father, can confirm it. (2017-08-02)

Crustal limestone platforms feed carbon to many of Earth's arc volcanoes
A new analysis suggests that much of the carbon released from volcanic arcs, chains of volcanoes that arise along the tectonic plates of a subduction zone, comes from remobilizing limestone reservoirs in the Earth's crust. (2017-07-20)

Sea shells for sale: A new source of sustainable biomaterials
Over 7 million tonnes of mollusc shells are discarded by the seafood industry each year as unwanted waste -- and the vast majority of these shells are either thrown in landfills or dumped at sea. Dr. James Morris and a team of CACHE researchers from the Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences are looking at environmentally and economically sustainable options for these biomaterials. (2017-07-04)

Scientists find world's oldest fossil mushroom
Roughly 115 million years ago, when the ancient supercontinent Gondwana was breaking apart, a mushroom fell into a river and began an improbable journey. Its ultimate fate as a mineralized fossil preserved in limestone in northeast Brazil makes it a scientific wonder, scientists report in the journal PLOS ONE. (2017-06-07)

Hard rocks from Himalaya raise flood risk for millions
Scientists have shown how earthquakes and storms in the Himalaya can increase the impact of deadly floods in one of Earth's most densely populated areas. (2017-04-26)

Scientists determined the time of extinction of ancient porcupines
A team of specialists that included scientists from Siberia, the Urals, and the University of Arizona, USA, conducted radiocarbon dating of the teeth and bones of ancient porcupines found in the caves of Gorny Altai and the Urals. They established that these thermophilic animals lived in these territories up to 30,000-40,000 years ago and died out with the onset of the Last Glacial Maximum. (2017-04-05)

Skeletons developed as chemistry of oceans changed, study shows
Skeletons and shells first came into being 550 million years ago as the chemical make-up of seawater changed, a study suggests. (2017-04-04)

Rock exposed in World War I trenches offers new fossil find
An unusual fossil find is giving scientists new ideas about how some of the earliest animals on Earth came to dominate the world's oceans. (2017-04-03)

Massive, computer-analyzed geological database reveals chemistry of ancient ocean
A study that used a new digital library and machine reading system to suck the factual marrow from millions of geologic publications dating back decades has unraveled a longstanding mystery of ancient life: Why did easy-to-see and once-common structures called stromatolites essentially cease forming over the long arc of earth history? (2017-03-30)

Synchrotron sheds (X-ray) light on carbon chemistry at ocean surfaces
Carbonate, bicarbonate, and carbonic acid emerge when atmospheric carbon dioxide dissolves in the oceans, which is the largest sink for this greenhouse gas. Researchers are interested in better understanding the carbonate system to potentially help facilitate carbon sequestration schemes, to help mitigate climate change. Recently, researchers made breakthrough discoveries about the carbonate species' behavior at saltwater surfaces, like that of the ocean. They report their findings this week in the Journal of Chemical Physics. (2017-03-07)

38,000-year-old engravings confirm ancient origins of technique used by Seurat, Van Gogh
A newly discovered trove of 16 engraved and otherwise modified limestone blocks, created 38,000 years ago, confirms the ancient origins of the pointillist techniques later adopted by 19th and 20th century artists such as Georges Seurat, Vincent Van Gogh, Camille Pissarro, and Roy Lichtenstein. (2017-02-24)

From rocks in Colorado, evidence of a 'chaotic solar system'
Plumbing a 90 million-year-old layer cake of sedimentary rock in Colorado, a team of scientists from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Northwestern University has found evidence confirming a critical theory of how the planets in our solar system behave in their orbits around the sun. The finding, published Feb. 23, 2017 in the journal Nature, is important because it provides the first hard proof for what scientists call the ''chaotic solar system.' (2017-02-22)

Anthropologists uncover art by (really) old masters -- 38,000 year-old engravings
An international team of anthropologists has uncovered a 38,000-year-old engraved image in a southwestern French rockshelter -- a finding that marks some of the earliest known graphic imagery found in Western Eurasia and offers insights into the nature of modern humans during this period. (2017-01-27)

Unexpected result: Ocean acidification can also promote shell formation
Fact: more carbon dioxide (CO2) in the air also acidifies the oceans. It seemed to be the logical conclusion that shellfish and corals will suffer, because chalk formation becomes more difficult in more acidic seawater. But now a group of Dutch and Japanese scientists discovered to their own surprise that some tiny unicellular shellfish (foraminifera) make better shells in an acidic environment. This is a completely new insight. The results of the Japanese-Dutch study are published in the leading scientific journal Nature Communications. (2017-01-27)

Discovery adds rock collecting to Neanderthal's repertoire
An international group that includes a University of Kansas researcher has discovered a brownish piece of split limestone in a site in Croatia that suggests Neanderthals 130,000 years ago collected the rock that stands out among all other items in the cave. (2017-01-17)

Building London's Houses of Parliament helped create clean-air laws
Britain's dazzling Houses of Parliament building, constructed from 1840 until 1870, is an international icon. But the building's greatest legacy may be something politicians and tourists don't think about much: the clean air around it. That's the implication of newly published research by MIT architectural historian Timothy Hyde, who through original archival work has reconstructed a piece of history lost in the haze of time. (2017-01-12)

Study describes new method to remove nickel from contaminated seawater
The same deposit that builds up in many tea kettles or water pipes in areas where calcium-rich water is the norm might be just the (cheap) ticket to rid contaminated seawater of toxic metals. This is according to a research group led by Charlotte Carré of the University of New Caledonia in the French Pacific territory of New Caledonia and published today in Springer's journal Environmental Chemistry Letters. (2017-01-11)

'Tiny earthquakes' help scientists predict mountain rock falls
Scientists have developed a new way to predict when mountain rock falls will happen -- in regions where people go skiing and climbing. The technique involves detecting tiny earthquakes which cause cracks in the mountain rock. (2016-12-19)

Ring-tailed lemurs: Going, going, gone?
The ring-tailed lemur, a primate that is emblematic of the wild and wonderful creatures inhabiting the tropical island of Madagascar, is in big trouble -- there less than 2,500 left in wild, says new study involving the University of Colorado Boulder and the University of Victoria. (2016-12-19)

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