Current Lip Augmentation News and Events

Current Lip Augmentation News and Events, Lip Augmentation News Articles.
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Half of global wastewater treated, rates in developing countries still lagging
A new study by scientists at Utrecht University and the United Nations University concludes that about half of global wastewater is treated, rather than the previous estimate of 20%. Despite this promising finding, the authors warn that treatment rates in developing countries are still very low. The study and its dataset were published Open Access in the journal Earth System Science Data. (2021-02-08)

Genes for face shape identified
Genes that determine the shape of a person's facial profile have been discovered by a UCL-led research team. (2021-02-05)

Researchers use patients' cells to test gene therapy for rare eye disease
Scientists at the National Eye Institute (NEI) have developed a promising gene therapy strategy for a rare disease that causes severe vision loss in childhood. A form of Leber congenital amaurosis, the disease is caused by autosomal-dominant mutations in the CRX gene, which are challenging to treat with gene therapy. (2021-01-28)

Chinese spice helps unravel the mysteries of human touch
New insight into how human brains detect and perceive different types of touch, such as fluttery vibrations and steady pressures, has been revealed by UCL scientists with the help of the ancient Chinese cooking ingredient, Szechuan pepper. (2021-01-28)

Latch, load and release: Elastic motion makes click beetles click, study finds
Click beetles can propel themselves more than 20 body lengths into the air, and they do so without using their legs. While the jump's motion has been studied in depth, the physical mechanisms that enable the beetles' signature clicking maneuver have not. A new study examines the forces behind this super-fast energy release and provides guidelines for studying extreme motion, energy storage and energy release in other small animals like trap-jaw ants and mantis shrimps. (2021-01-18)

Making therapeutic sense of antisense oligonucleotides
In a significant extension of their previous research work, researchers at Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) and Ionis Pharmaceuticals, USA, have devised a molecular structural modification that boosts the efficacy of antisense oligonucleotide-based drugs by replacing the RNA strand of a heteroduplex oligonucleotide with DNA. This advance expands the scope and clinical applicability of nucleic-acid therapeutics across an ever-widening swathe of intractable diseases including neurological disorders. (2021-01-05)

Volcanic eruptions directly triggered ocean acidification during Early Cretaceous
New study supports hypothesis that Ontong Java Plateau large igneous province eruptions led to oceanic anoxic event 1a, 127 to 100 million years ago. (2020-12-21)

Genetics of human face begin to reveal underlying profile
The genetics behind the shape of the human face are difficult to decipher, but now an international team of researchers has connected specific genetic signals with specific areas of the face. They not only can see the signals of normal facial features in the genome, but also hope their work can shed light on craniofacial malformations such as cleft lip and palate. (2020-12-07)

New method brings physics to deep learning to better simulate turbulence
Deep learning, also called machine learning, reproduces data to model problem scenarios and offer solutions. However, some problems in physics are unknown or cannot be represented in detail mathematically on a computer. Researchers at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign developed a new method that brings physics into the machine learning process to make better predictions. The researchers used turbulence to test their method. (2020-11-16)

Why a "board-certified cosmetic surgeon" isn't a plastic surgeon, and what that means for you
Cosmetic surgery is not just another way of saying plastic surgery. Doctors who advertise themselves as certified by the American Board of Cosmetic Surgery (ABCS) don't measure up to meet the criteria required for board-certified plastic surgeons. (2020-11-06)

Burt's Bees presents clinical data on brand's natural lip and anti-aging skincare efficacy
Burt's Bees, a pioneer in natural skin care, today announced new research supporting the role of efficacy-first, natural regimens to defend, replenish and restore vibrant, healthier-looking skin. The studies will be presented at the virtual Integrative Dermatology Symposium (IDS) from October 23 - November 1, 2020. (2020-10-23)

UCI-led study reveals restoration of retinal and visual function following gene therapy
A breakthrough study, led by researchers from the University of California, Irvine, results in the restoration of retinal and visual functions of mice models suffering from inherited retinal disease. (2020-10-19)

Liquid gel in COVID patients' lungs makes way for new treatment
In some patients who died with severe COVID-19 and respiratory failure, a jelly was formed in the lungs. Researchers have now established what the active agent in the jelly is and thanks to that, this new discovery can now be the key to new effective therapies. This according to a new study at Umeå University, Sweden. (2020-10-06)

Catheter ablation linked to reduced risk of dementia in patients with atrial fibrillation
People with atrial fibrillation have a reduced risk of dementia if they undergo a procedure called catheter ablation to restore the normal rhythm of their heart, according to a new study published in the European Heart Journal that analyses over 27,000 patients with newly diagnosed atrial fibrillation out of a population of nearly a million people. (2020-10-06)

Surgery for benign breast disease does not impair future breastfeeding capability
Young women with benign breast conditions may undergo surgery without jeopardizing their ability to breastfeed later on. (2020-10-03)

Tumor progression depends on the tumor microenvironment
Researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) and Niigata University identified a novel mechanism by which tumors progress. By studying the role of TNF-α and TGF-β in the formation of cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), the researchers found that both proteins together exert a robust effect on the development of CAFs. They further found that oral cancer cells show increased tumor progression in response to TGF-β protein secreted from CAFs. The findings of this study could help develop novel cancer therapies. (2020-10-01)

Antipsychotics for treating adult depression linked with higher mortality
Rutgers researchers, together with colleagues at Columbia University, have reported an increased mortality risk in adults with depression who initiated augmentation with newer antipsychotic medications compared to a control group that initiated augmentation with a second antidepressant. (2020-09-30)

How everyday speech could transmit viral droplets
High-speed imaging of an individual producing common speech sounds shows that the sudden burst of airflow produced from the articulation of consonants like /p/ or /b/ carry salivary and mucus droplets for at least a meter in front of a speaker. (2020-09-29)

Tests indicate modern oral nicotine products elicit lower toxicity responses than cigs
New research by BAT indicates that Modern Oral Products (MOPs) showed lower toxicity responses in certain assays than traditional cigarettes. (2020-09-28)

The psychosocial benefits of plastic surgery for young women with congenital breast asymmetry
Nearly all women have breasts that are slightly different from each other. However, some women have more marked differences in the size, shape, or position of the breasts even after development is complete -- leading to negative effects on emotional well-being and self-image. (2020-09-24)

Ocean hitchhiker's sucker mechanism offers potential for underwater adhesion
A new study has revealed how remora suckerfish detach themselves from the surfaces they've clung to - and how the mechanism could provide inspiration for future reversible underwater adhesion devices. The research, by an international, multidisciplinary team working across robotics, comparative biology, and electrical engineering, investigated the detachment mechanism of the remora's suction disc, and experimented with how it could be applied in underwater robots. (2020-08-24)

Army robo-teammate can detect, share 3D changes in real-time
Something is different, and you can't quite put your finger on it. But your robot can. (2020-08-24)

Untapped potential for TikTok to convey COVID-19 guidance
Research published in DeGruyter's International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health suggests TikTok is rich with untapped educational potential. The platform could play a vital role in conveying important health information alongside lip-syncing videos and viral dance challenges, the paper's authors say. (2020-08-11)

'SoundWear' a heads-up sound augmentation gadget helps expand children's play experience
KAIST researchers designed a wearable bracelet using sound augmentation to leverage play benefits by employing digital technology. The research team also investigated how sound influences children's play experiences according to their physical, social, and imaginative aspects. (2020-07-27)

Age-related features of facial anatomy for increase safety during plastic surgery
Researchers from the Center for Diagnostics and Telemedicine together with colleagues from Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and Science, University of Munich and Sechenov University used computed tomography to analyze the individual anatomy of the nasolabial triangle. They identified possible options for the distribution of blood vessels on three-dimensional course. (2020-07-10)

Adipose-derived stem cells considerably improve fat graft retention in breast augmentation
Results of a clinical trial released in STEM CELLS Translational Medicine indicates that breast augmentation in patients treated with fat grafts enriched with autologous adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) had significantly superior results compared to those treated with non-enriched grafts. (2020-07-08)

ASPS predicts new industry trends amidst COVID-19 reopenings
As the COVID-19 pandemic has changed how plastic surgeons will care for patients and how they operate their practices, the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS) recently conducted a member survey to understand what procedures were top of mind among patients to gauge whether the public's mindset on preferred treatments has shifted. (2020-06-25)

For children with cleft lip and palate, no major psychological impact of repeated surgeries
Children born with cleft lip and cleft palate (CLP) commonly undergo multiple surgical procedures between infancy and adolescence. By the time they are teens, patients with CLP with more total surgeries do not have increased psychosocial problems. (2020-06-25)

Getting real with immersive sword fights
Sword fights are often the weak link in virtual reality (VR) fighting games, with digital avatars engaging in battle using imprecise, pre-recorded movements that barely reflect the player's actions or intentions. Now a team at the University of Bath, in collaboration with the game development studio Ninja Theory, has found a solution to the challenges of creating realistic VR sword fights: Touche - a data-driven computer model based on machine learning. (2020-06-23)

Chimpanzees help trace the evolution of human speech back to ancient ancestors
One of the most promising theories for the evolution of human speech has finally received support from chimpanzee communication, in a study conducted by a group of researchers led by the University of Warwick. (2020-05-26)

Self-isolating? Get fit faster with multi-ghost racing
Eager to ramp up your fitness while stuck at home? A new generation of virtual reality (VR) exergames nudges home-based cyclists to perform a lot better by immersing them in a crowd of cyclists. And as all cyclists participating in the race are versions of the flesh-and-blood player, the Covid-19 norms of social distancing are maintained even in the parallel universe of VR. (2020-05-19)

Children born with a cleft lip unlikely to be genetically inclined to do poorly at school
New research has found that children born with a cleft lip, either with or without a cleft palate, are not likely to be genetically predisposed to do less well at school than their peers. The study by the Cleft Collective research team at the University of Bristol is published today in the International Journal of Epidemiology. (2020-05-06)

The facial expressions of mice
The face of a mouse reveals its emotions. (2020-04-02)

Study finds 'smart' devices effective in reducing adverse outcomes of heart condition
A new study, published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, highlights the feasible use of mobile health (mHealth) devices to help with the screening and detection of a common heart condition. (2020-03-30)

Scientists visualize the structure of a key enzyme that makes triglycerides
The first structure of a lipin enzyme, which carries out an important step in the production of triglycerides, the main reservoir for long-term energy storage, will help scientists to better understand how lipins regulate the production of triglycerides. (2020-03-11)

Like patching a flat tire: New fix heals herniated discs
A new two-step technique to repair herniated discs uses hyaluronic acid gel to re-inflate the disc and collagen gel to seal the hole, essentially repairing ruptured discs like you'd repair a flat tire. (2020-03-11)

Skin and non-adhesive cells found to play pivotal role in the formation of fin
Human fingers are sculpted from a primitive pad-like structure during embryonic development. Sometimes, this process goes awry and babies are born with fused fingers or toes. A new study from the University of California, Irvine reveals new factors involved in the congenital malformation called syndactyly. (2020-02-27)

Vertical fibers in the suckerfish's suction cup-like fin help it hitchhike
As the hitchhikers of the marine world, the remora fish is well known for getting free rides by gripping onto hosts with its suction disc, a highly modified dorsal fin on its head. Now, work investigating the suction disc -- appearing Feb. 26 in the journal Matter -- reveals that one of the secrets to the fish's strong grip lies within the unique architecture of the lip of the disc. (2020-02-26)

New study examines the accuracy of plastic surgery videos on social media
In the era of 'Dr. Google,' social media is a tremendous influence on patients interested in cosmetic surgery, and with more than two billion users -- representing almost one-third of the internet -- YouTube has emerged as an essential platform for reaching people interested in plastic surgery. (2020-01-29)

Discovery reveals how remora fishes know when to hitch a ride aboard their hosts
In findings published in the Journal of the Royal Society Open Science, researchers have detailed the discovery of a tactile-sensory system stowed within the suction disc of remora, believed to enable the fish to acutely sense contact pressure with host surfaces and gauge ocean forces in order to determine when to initiate their attachment, as well as adjust their hold on hosts while traversing long distances. (2020-01-15)

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