Current Literacy News and Events

Current Literacy News and Events, Literacy News Articles.
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Tinnitus: A tingling mystery to be decrypted
According to a research conducted by JCDR, at least 9 out of 10 adults suffer from low health literacy in India. Health literacy is a vital aspect of any nation's growth - be it developed, underdeveloped or a developing nation. A team of researchers lead by Ruban Nersisson, at the School of Electrical Engineering, (2021-02-22)

Book developed at Cincinnati Children's helps identify risks of reading difficulties
A study published in the journal Pediatrics expands validation evidence for a new screening tool that directly engages preschool-age children during clinic visits to assess their early literacy skills. The tool, which is the first of its kind, has the potential to identify reading difficulties as early as possible, target interventions and empower families to help their child at home, according to researchers at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center. (2021-02-04)

New research investigates relationship between health literacy and self-care
It is important for patients to understand the necessary information for making health decisions, yet studies have shown that a large segment of the population lacks the health literacy to do so. Jessie Chin, School of Information Sciences at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, and colleagues have investigated the relationship between health literacy and ''actionable memory,'' or memory for medication purposes, among diabetic patients. They report their results in the Journal of General Internal Medicine. (2021-02-02)

When it comes to eyewitness accounts of earthquake shaking, representation matters
As scientists increasingly rely on eyewitness accounts of earthquake shaking reported through online systems, they should consider whether those accounts are societally and spatially representative for an event, according to a new paper published in Seismological Research Letters. (2021-01-21)

Study finds Dense Breast Notification legislation has not met all desired goals
Little previous research has examined the effects of Dense Breast Notifications (DBNs), but a new study suggests the legislatively required notifications have achieved partial success: women living in states in which in DBNs are mandated had higher rates of being informed about personal breast density and of having had breast density discussions with providers, though rates were low overall. (2021-01-11)

'Race norming' blamed for denying payouts to ex-NFL players with dementia
A UCSF clinical psychologist has taken aim at the National Football League (NFL) for ''race norming'' black players diagnosed with dementia, a practice that is depriving them of the monetary awards allocated to former footballers with neurodegenerative disorders. (2020-12-21)

Citizens versus the internet: Confronting digital challenges with cognitive tools
In the latest issue of Psychological Science in the Public Interest, a team of researchers recommend ways that psychological and behavioral sciences can help decrease the negative consequences of Internet use. These recommendations emphasize helping people gain greater control over their digital environments. (2020-12-21)

Social media use by young people in conflict-ridden Myanmar
Myanmar youth rely heavily on Facebook for news and information. This can be a platform for disseminating fake news and hate speech. With poor digital literacy skills, these youths may be susceptible to disinformation campaigns and other online dangers (2020-12-21)

Study finds strong links between trust and social media use
A recent study finds a powerful correlation between the extent to which users trust Facebook, and the intensity of their Facebook use. The study also finds what contributes to that user trust. (2020-12-10)

Preschool program linked with better social and emotional skills years later
A preschool enrichment program developed at Penn State helps boost social and emotional skills that still have positive effects years later during middle and high school, according to a new study. (2020-12-10)

What makes COVID misinformation so tough to stop on social media
A recent study highlights two of the reasons that misinformation about COVID-19 is so difficult to tackle on social media: most people think they're above average at spotting misinformation; and misinformation often triggers negative emotions that resonate with people. The findings may help communicators share accurate information more effectively. (2020-12-07)

Study finds gamblers ignore important information when placing bet
People with gambling problems are less likely to consider important information that could prevent them from losing, according to new research published today from the UBC's Centre for Gambling Research. (2020-12-03)

Transcultural literacies and meaning-making through fanfiction
This is the subject of analysis of a digital ethnography study by Liudmila Shafirova, Daniel Cassany and Carme Bach, all members of the GR@EL research group at the Department of Translation and Language Sciences, published in Journal of Language and Intercultural Communication on 24 September. (2020-11-25)

Study examines health literacy and shared decision-making in prostate cancer screening
New research examines the dynamics between men's health literacy, their discussions with their doctors, and their decisions on whether to get tested for prostate-specific antigen (PSA), a potential marker of prostate cancer. The findings are published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society (ACS). (2020-11-09)

Game 'pre-bunks' political misinformation by letting players undermine democracy
An online game helps ''inoculate'' players against fake news by showing them how political misinformation is created and circulated. Launched today, Harmony Square has been created by Cambridge University psychologists with support from US Department of Homeland Security. Accompanying study shows that a single play reduces the perceived reliability of misinformation in users. (2020-11-06)

Conflicts in kindergarten can reduce children's interest in reading and math
Teacher-perceived conflict predicts lower interest and pre-academic skills in math and literacy among kindergarteners, a new study from Finland shows. (2020-11-05)

Cut chores and kill chill time: new advice to boost children's academic achievement
Determining a child's best daily balance of sleep, activity and relaxation can be a challenge, but if you're hoping to improve their academic results, then it's time to cut back on chores and chill time, according to new research from the University of South Australia. (2020-10-28)

Divide and conquer: a new formula to minimize 'mathemaphobia'
Maths - it's the subject some kids love to hate, yet despite its lack of popularity, mathematics is critical for a STEM-capable workforce and vital for Australia's current and future productivity. New research finds that boosting student confidence in maths, is pivotal to greater engagement with the subject. (2020-10-26)

Seeing no longer believing: the manipulation of online images
A peace sign from Martin Luther King, Jr, becomes a rude gesture; dolphins in Venice's Grand Canal - manipulated or mis-used images posted as truth. Australian researchers say image editing software is so common and easy to use, it has the power to re-imagine history. Even the White House is doing it and deadline-driven journalists lack the tools to tell the difference, especially when images come from social media. (2020-10-21)

Facebook users spread Russian propaganda less often when they know source
Russia uses Facebook and other social media to polarize Americans, particularly those at the extreme ends of the political spectrum. A unique study that enrolled 1,500 Facebook users found that they are less likely to share content when they learn that it is part of a foreign propaganda campaign. (2020-10-15)

Novel software assesses phonologial awareness
Understanding sounds in language is a critical building block for child literacy, yet this skill is often overlooked. Researchers from Michigan State University have developed a new software tool to assess children's phonological awareness -- or, how they process the sound structure of words. (2020-10-14)

As genome-editing trials become more common, informed consent is changing
As public interest and expanded research in human genome editing grows, many questions remain about ethical, legal and social implications of the technology. People who are seriously ill may overestimate the benefits of early clinical trials while underestimating the risks. This makes properly understanding informed consent, the full knowledge of risks and benefits of treatments, especially important. (2020-10-12)

A simple enrollment change yields big dividends in children's early learning program
Researchers know that texting programs can greatly benefit young children's literacy. Now new research shows that parents' participation in such programs can be boosted exponentially with one simple tweak: automatic enrollment, combined with the ability to opt out. (2020-10-06)

How long does the preschool advantage last?
Children who attend preschool enter kindergarten with greater skills than those who don't, but that advantage is nearly halved by the end of the year as their counterparts quickly begin to catch up, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. (2020-10-05)

Tel Aviv University study confirms widespread literacy in biblical-period kingdom of Judah
Researchers at Tel Aviv University (TAU) have analyzed 18 ancient texts dating back to around 600 BCE from the Tel Arad military post using state-of-the-art image processing, machine learning technologies, and the expertise of a senior handwriting examiner, and concluded that the texts were written by no fewer than 12 authors, suggesting that many of the inhabitants of the kingdom of Judah during that period were able to read and write, (2020-09-10)

Low health literacy may be a risk factor for postoperative infection
CHICAGO: Surgical patients are more likely to experience a postoperative infection if they have low health literacy, which is a limited capacity to understand and act on health information, according to results of a new study presented at the American College of Surgeons (ACS) 2020 Quality and Safety Conference VIRTUAL. (2020-08-24)

Federal and state websites flunk COVID-19 reading-level review
Information about COVID-19 offered by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the White House, and state health departments failed to meet recommendations for communicating with the public. (2020-08-18)

Many medical 'rainy day' accounts aren't getting opened or filled, study finds
One-third of the people who could benefit from a special type of savings account to cushion the blow of their health plan deductible aren't doing so, a new study finds. And even among people who do open a health savings account, half haven't put any money into it in the past year. This means they may be missing a chance to avoid taxes on money they can use to pay for their health insurance deductible and other costs. (2020-08-13)

Food menu fit for pandemic times
In the midst of the global COVID-19 pandemic, eating well in a sustainable way is more important now than ever, Flinders University experts say. 'Eating local' and growing your own fruit and vegetables can save money, provide families and local producers with vital income - and also improve health and immunity. (2020-08-03)

Subsidies, weather, and financial education promote agricultural insurance adoption
A University of Maryland-led study shows that subsidies can help people continually purchase insurance, but only if they have the financial literacy to understand the benefits and have the experience of seeing the policy in action. In a new paper published in American Economic Review, researchers conducted the first ever experimental study to look at the impact of subsidies. This paper provides insight into the ''insurance puzzle'', with implications for policy and educational programs. (2020-07-29)

Research explores the link between wages, school and cognitive ability in South Africa
Using data sets that only became available in recent years, researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York analyzed the wage impact of cognitive skills in South Africa. (2020-07-22)

COVID-19 pandemic could be learning opportunity for middle-grade students
Educators could use the COVID-19 outbreak to help middle-schoolers better understand the world, according to new research from faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York. (2020-07-14)

Science education community should withdraw from international tests
The science community should withdraw from involvement in international tests such as PISA because they have forced schools to adopt 'narrow' curricula and pedagogies, a study says. (2020-07-09)

Coronavirus: Social distancing accepted when people understand exponential growth
Experiments among U.S. population show: When people fail to see the need for restrictions on public life, explaining the exponential increase of infections creates greater acceptance for measures taken to slow down the infection rate. (2020-06-29)

Simple interventions can help people spot false headlines
A team of researchers found that after being exposed to Facebook's tips on how to spot misinformation, people in the United States and India were less likely to say a false headline was true. However, this ability weakened over time, suggesting that digital literacy needs to be taught with regularity. (2020-06-22)

Giving people 'digital literacy' tips can help them spot dubious information online
Giving people 'digital literacy' tips can help them identify dubious information online, a new study shows. (2020-06-22)

COVID-19 pandemic could decimate outdoor environmental, science education programs
A survey of 1,000 outdoor education programs nationwide finds that nearly two-thirds are in danger of folding because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Such programs connect youth with the world around them and teach about nature, with documented academic, health and social benefits. But most programs are conducted by residential outdoor science schools, nature centers, parks and zoos, not in traditional classrooms. The loss will be felt disproportionately by students of color and low-income students. (2020-06-15)

School may be the key to improvement for children in social care
Children in social care have poorer mental health and perform worse in school than other children. But they have trust in the school staff and perform better after individual assessment at school. These are findings in a doctoral thesis from Linköping University. (2020-06-12)

Interpreting DTC testing results imposes a major burden on genetics services
A study from Australia finds that because patients are increasingly approaching GPs about the results of direct-to consumer genetic testing, and GPs are ill-equipped to advise them, this is having an impact on already overloaded clinical genetics services. (2020-06-05)

Heart failure patients with limited health literacy may have higher risk of death
Patients with heart failure who experience low health literacy are at an increased risk of hospitalization and mortality. This finding has significant clinical and public health implications and suggests that assessing and intervening upon an individual's understanding of their own health could improve heart failure outcomes, according to research published in JACC: Heart Failure. (2020-05-25)

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