Current Lithosphere News and Events

Current Lithosphere News and Events, Lithosphere News Articles.
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Thick lithosphere casts doubt on plate tectonics in Venus's geologically recent past
A study of a giant impact crater on Venus suggests that its lithosphere was too thick to have had Earth-like plate tectonics, at least for much of the past billion years. (2021-01-28)

Geological phenomenon widening the Atlantic Ocean
An upsurge of matter from deep beneath the Earth's crust could be pushing the continents of North and South America further apart from Europe and Africa, new research has found. (2021-01-27)

Study suggests great earthquakes as cause of Arctic warming
A researcher from MIPT has proposed a new explanation for the Arctic's rapid warming. In his recent paper in Geosciences, he suggests that the warming could have been triggered by a series of great earthquakes (2020-12-23)

Scientists discover compounds that could have helped to start life on Earth
Scientists from St Petersburg University and Ben-Gurion University of the Negev have discovered natural cyclophosphates. These are possible precursors of phosphorus-containing molecules that are believed to have contributed to the emergence of primordial life on Earth. Cyclophosphates could have been formed billions of years ago in regions of elevated geothermal activity or during meteorite bombardments of the Earth. (2020-12-14)

A dessert-like desert: Californian lithosphere resembles crème brûlée
A model for the southeastern California lithosphere suggests that a strong upper crust overlies weaker lower rock layers. (2020-11-30)

Transportation of water into the deep Earth by Al-phase D
Researchers at Ehime University have recently measured the propagation speed of ultrasonic waves in an aluminum-rich hydrous mineral called Al-phase D at pressure conditions relevant to the Earth's deep mantle. Their results suggest that seismic shear anomalies observed locally beneath subduction zones may reveal the presence of hydrous minerals in the uppermost lower mantle, which would have important implications for the Earth's interior because hydrogen affects considerably the physical and chemical properties of mantle minerals. (2020-11-30)

The connectivity of multicomponent fluids in subduction zones
A team of researchers has discovered more about the grain-scale fluid connectivity beneath the earth's surface, shedding new light on fluid circulation and seismic velocity anomalies in subduction zones. (2020-11-12)

Distinct slab interfaces found within mantle transition zone
Prof. CHEN Qifu's group from the Institute of Geology and Geophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (IGGCAS) and their collaborators observed two distinct seismic discontinuities within the mantle transition zone (~410 km to 660 km) beneath the western Pacific. (2020-11-09)

Deep magma facilitates the movement of tectonic plates
A small amount of molten rock located under tectonic plates encourages them to move. This is what scientists from the LGL-TPE (CNRS/ENS de Lyon/UCBL1) have recently discovered. Their new model takes into account not only the velocity of seismic waves but also the way in which they are attenuated by the medium they pass through. The velocity of tectonic plates near the surface is thus directly correlated with the quantity of magma present. (2020-10-21)

Lost and found: UH geologists 'resurrect' missing tectonic plate
A team of geologists at the University of Houston College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics believes they have found the lost plate known as Resurrection in northern Canada by using existing mantle tomography images. (2020-10-20)

Glimpse deep into Earth's crust finds heat source that may stabilize continents
Rocks from the Rio Grande continental rift have provided a rare snapshot of active geology deep inside Earth's crust, revealing new evidence for how continents remain stable over billions of years, according to a team of scientists. (2020-10-19)

Natural nanodiamonds in oceanic rocks
Natural diamonds can form through low pressure and temperature geological processes on Earth, as stated in an article published in the journal Geochemical Perspectives Letters. (2020-10-16)

Earthquake lightning: Mysterious luminescence phenomena
Photoemission induced by rock fracturing can occur as a result of landslides associated with earthquakes. Factors involved in such earthquake lightnings were studied with granite, rhyolite, pyroclastic rock and limestone. (2020-09-28)

Detaching and uplifting, not bulldozing
ETH researchers have used a computer model to test a new hypothesis about the formation of the Alps while simulating seismic activity in Switzerland. This will help improve current earthquake risk models. (2020-09-17)

A new idea on how Earth's outer shell first broke into tectonic plates
Plate tectonics theory posits that Earth's outer shell is subdivided into plates that move relative to each other, concentrating most activity along the boundaries between plates, yet the scientific community has no firm concept on how plate tectonics got started. A new answer has been put forward by Dr. Alexander Webb at the University of Hong Kong, in collaboration with an international team in a paper published in Nature Communications. (2020-07-19)

Geologists identify deep-earth structures that may signal hidden metal lodes
In a new study, scientists have discovered previously unrecognized structural lines 100 miles or more down in the earth that appear to signal the locations of giant deposits of copper, lead, zinc and other vital metals lying close enough to the surface to be mined, but too far down to be found using current exploration methods. (2020-06-30)

Why the Victoria Plate in Africa rotates
The East African Rift System is a newly forming plate tectonic boundary at which the African continent is being separated into several plates. According to GPS data, one of those, the Victoria microplate, is moving in a counterclockwise rotation relative to Africa in contrast to the other plates involved. Now, researchers have found evidence that suggests that the configuration of weaker and stronger lithospheric regions controls the rotation of continental microplates and Victoria in particular. (2020-06-08)

Study shows diamonds aren't forever
Two Tulane researchers were among a team of international experts who co-authored a paper that was published in the journal Nature on June 3. (2020-06-04)

Scientists decipher the role of carbon and the break-up of continents
An international collaboration has led scientists to new insights into the storage and dynamic transfer of carbon below thick and very old continental crust currently published in the journal Nature titled, Displacement of cratonic mantle and lithospheric channeling concentrates deep carbon during continental rifting. (2020-06-03)

New discovery could highlight areas where earthquakes are less likely to occur
Scientists from Cardiff University have discovered specific conditions that occur along the ocean floor where two tectonic plates are more likely to slowly creep past one another as opposed to drastically slipping and creating catastrophic earthquakes. (2020-06-02)

New clues to deep earthquake mystery
A new understanding of our planet's deepest earthquakes could help unravel one of the most mysterious geophysical processes on Earth. (2020-05-27)

Signals from inside the Earth: Borexino experiment releases new data on geoneutrinos
The Borexino collaboration has presented new results for the measurement of neutrinos originating from the interior of the Earth. With this update, the researchers have now been able to access 53 events -- almost twice as many as in the previous analysis of the data from the Borexino detector, which is located 1,400 meters below the Earth's surface. The results provide an exclusive insight into processes in the earth's interior that remain puzzling to this day. (2020-01-22)

The Antarctic: study from Kiel provides data about the structure of the icy continent
Satellite data from the European Space Agency (ESA) has now been used as the basis for new insights on the deep structure of the continent Antarctica. Scientists from Kiel University (CAU) recently published their discoveries in the 'Journal of Geophysical Research: Solid Earth' in cooperation with scientists from the British Antarctic Survey, Great Britain, and Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands. (2019-12-09)

Earthquakes can be predicted five days ahead
An international team of researchers, which includes physicists from HSE University and the RAS Space Research Institute (IKI), have discovered that, with an impending earthquake, the parameters of internal gravity waves (IGWs) can change five days before a seismic event. This data can help experts develop short-term earthquake forecast methods. The results of the study have been published in the journal Doklady Earth Sciences. (2019-10-23)

What happens under the Yellowstone Volcano
A recent study by Bernhard Steinberger of the German GeoForschungsZentrum and colleagues in the USA helps to better understand the processes in the Earth's interior beneath the Yellowstone supervolcano. The paper will soon appear in the journal 'Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems' published by the American Geophysical Union. It is based on modelling the Earth's mantle. (2019-10-17)

Deep-earth diamonds reveal primordial rock source in Earth's mantle
An analysis of helium isotopes locked inside 'super-deep' diamonds hundreds of kilometers below Earth's surface suggests that vast reservoirs of molten primordial source rock, perhaps nearly as old as the Earth, are present. (2019-08-15)

How to interact between mantle and crustal components in the subduction zone?
Subduction process drives the differential evolution of the earth and realizes material cycle and energy exchange. Recent studies have shown that orogenic peridotites reveal crust-mantle interaction in subduction zone. SCIENCE CHINA Earth Sciences has published relevant reports. (2019-05-24)

Permian volcanism contributed to atmospheric greenhouse gas content in Antarctica
The Choiyoi magmatic Province, with an estimated volume of ~1.3 million square kilometers, represents a voluminous Permian subduction-related volcanic episode that has thus far been described only from South America. In their new paper for Lithosphere, Demian Nelson and John Cottle investigated Permian volcaniclastic rocks from central Antarctica to determine the potential magmatic source of volcanic detritus in southwestern Gondwana. (2019-04-02)

Enhanced views of Earth tectonics
Scientists from Germany's Kiel University and British Antarctic Survey (BAS) have used data from the European Space Agency (ESA), Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) mission to unveil key geological features of the Earth's lithosphere -- the rigid outer layer that includes the crust and the upper mantle. (2018-11-05)

Upper Cretaceous trench deposits of the Neo-Tethyan subduction zone
Exposed along the southern side of the Yarlung Zangbo suture, the Jiachala Formation is a key unit to decipher the history of convergence and subsequent collision between the India and the Asia plates. A new research suggest that the Jiachala Formation was deposited during the Late Cretaceous (~88-84 Ma) in the trench formed along the southern edge of Asia during subduction of Neo-Tethyan oceanic lithosphere. (2018-08-27)

Geologists uncover new clues about largest mass extinction ever
A new study could help explain the driving force behind the largest mass extinction in the history of earth, known as the End-Permian Extinction. (2018-08-27)

NASA scientist reveals details of icy Greenland's heated geologic past
By mapping the heat escaping from below the Greenland Ice Sheet, a NASA scientist has sharpened our understanding of the dynamics that dominate and shape terrestrial planets. (2018-08-01)

New model reveals rips in Earth's mantle layer below southern Tibet
Seismic waves are helping researchers uncover the mysterious subsurface history of the Tibetan Plateau, possibly lending insight to future earthquake activity in the region. (2018-07-30)

Scientists reveal the links between deep carbon cycle and geodynamics of big mantle wedge
The formation age of the big mantle wedge beneath eastern Asia and the lithospheric thinning mechanism of the North China craton are two key scientific issues. Based on new findings of deep carbon cycle, a recent study suggests that the big mantle wedge beneath eastern Asia was formed 125 Ma, and interaction between the CO2-rich silicate melt produced in the big mantle wedge and lithospheric mantle results in lithospheric thinning of the North China craton. (2018-07-19)

UMass Amherst geoscientists offer new evidence for how the Adirondack Mountains formed
The formation mechanism of the Adirondack Mountains in upstate New York has long posed a geologic mystery, say seismology researchers at the nearby University of Massachusetts Amherst. A few have been proposed, but until recently tools for evaluating them were not in place, say postdoctoral fellow Xiaotao Yang and assistant professor Haiying Gao. Now they propose a mechanism with evidence to support it. (2018-06-26)

Site of the next major earthquake on the San Andreas Fault?
Many researchers hypothesize that the southern tip of the 1300-km-long San Andreas fault zone (SAFZ) could be the nucleation site of the next major earthquake on the fault, yet geoscientists cannot evaluate this hazard until the location and geometry of the fault zone is documented. (2018-06-19)

Flow in the asthenosphere drags tectonic plates along
New simulations of the asthenosphere find that convective cycling and pressure-driven flow can sometimes cause Earth's most fluid layer of mantle to move even faster than the tectonic plates that ride atop it. (2018-05-29)

Geoscientists suggest 'snowball Earth' resulted from plate tectonics
About 700 million years ago, the Earth experienced unusual episodes of global cooling that geologists refer to as 'Snowball Earth.' In a new study published in the April issue of the journal Terra Nova, two geologists at The University of Texas at Dallas and UT Austin suggest that those major climate changes can be linked to one thing: the advent of plate tectonics. (2018-05-07)

Continental interiors may not be as tectonically stable as geologists think
A University of Illinois-led team has identified unexpected geophysical signals underneath tectonically stable interiors of South America and Africa. The data suggest that geologic activity within stable portions of Earth's uppermost layer may have occurred more recently than previously believed. The findings, published in Nature Geoscience, challenge some of today's leading theories regarding plate tectonics. (2018-02-19)

New details emerge on temperature, mobility of earth's lower crust in Rocky Mountains
A research team led by Colorado State University has mapped the temperature and viscosity of earth's lower crust for the first time. (2018-01-17)

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