Current Liver Transplant News and Events

Current Liver Transplant News and Events, Liver Transplant News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
Lab-grown 'mini-bile ducts' used to repair human livers in regenerative medicine first
Scientists at the University of Cambridge have used a technique to grow bile duct organoids - often referred to as 'mini-organs' - in the lab and shown that these can be used to repair damaged human livers. This is the first time that the technique has been used on human organs. (2021-02-18)

Organoids grown from bile duct cells repair human livers; may aid liver transplant processes
Organoids grown from bile duct epithelial cells can be used to repair damaged bile ducts in transplanted human livers, researchers report. (2021-02-18)

Understanding cellular clock synchronization
In humans, the disruption of circadian clocks is the cause of many metabolic diseases. Thanks to an observation tool based on bioluminescence, a research (UNIGE) were able to demonstrate that cells that compose a particular organ can be in-phase, even in the absence of the central brain clock. Indeed, the scientists managed to restore circadian function in the liver in completely arrhythmic mice, demonstrating that neurons are not unique in their ability to coordinate. (2021-02-17)

Cytoglobin: key player in preventing liver disease
Researchers have discovered that the use of Cytoglobin (CYGB) as an intravenous drug could delay liver fibrosis progression in mice. CYGB, discovered in 2001 by Professor Norifumi Kawada, is present in hepatic stellate cells, the cells that produce fibrotic molecules such as collagens when the liver has acute or chronic inflammation induced by different etiologies. The enhancement of CYGB on these cells or the injection of recombinant CYGB has the effect of suppressing liver damage and cirrhosis. (2021-02-16)

Going the distance--insights into how cancer cells spread
In a study published in Nature Communications, cancer researchers at Kanazawa University identify mechanisms by which malignant tumor cells extend their toxicity to distinct cell types and in turn help them spread. (2021-02-12)

Ionic liquid uniformly delivers chemotherapy to tumors while destroying cancerous tissue
A Mayo Clinic team, led by Rahmi Oklu, M.D., Ph.D., a vascular and interventional radiologist at Mayo Clinic, in collaboration with Samir Mitragotri, Ph.D., of Harvard University, report the development of a new ionic liquid formulation that killed cancer cells and allowed uniform distribution of a chemotherapy drug into liver tumors and other solid tumors in the lab. This discovery could solve a problem that has long plagued drug delivery to tumors. (2021-02-11)

STING activation reduces graft-versus-host disease in a mouse model
MUSC Hollings Cancer Center researcher Yongxia Wu, Ph.D., identified a new target molecule in the fight against graft-versus-host disease. (2021-02-11)

Routine blood tests could be key to stopping the silent killer of liver disease
New research has shown that results of blood tests routinely performed by GPs everywhere contain a hidden fingerprint that can identify people silently developing potentially fatal liver cirrhosis. The researchers have developed an algorithm to detect this fingerprint that could be freely installed on any clinical computer, making this a low-cost way for GPs to carry out large scale screening using patient data they already hold. (2021-02-11)

Type 2 diabetes: drugs initially increase glucose production
Although SGLT-2 inhibitors are central to the treatment of diabetes, their exact mode of action was hitherto unknown. A study shows that there is a direct correlation between the elimination of glucose via the kidneys and new glucose production in the liver. (2021-02-08)

Drug 'breakthrough' gives longest-ever survival in nonresectable liver cancer patients
New follow-up data from a landmark study of liver cancer patients treated with a combination of an immunotherapy drug (atezolizumab) and a monoclonal antibody (bevacizumab) has shown the longest-ever survival time in a frontline phase 3 trial of systemic therapy in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), demonstrating a 'major breakthrough' in the field. (2021-02-05)

Cancer leading cause of death among people with diabetes
Cancer is the leading cause of death among people with diabetes in England. (2021-02-04)

New combination therapy offers chance of healing hepatitis B
Around 260 million people, more than three percent of the global population, are chronically infected with the hepatitis B virus (HBV); in the long term, this often leads to complications such as liver cirrhosis and liver cancer. A cure is not yet possible with the available medication. Scientists at the German Center for Infection Research (DZIF) and the University Hospital Eppendorf (UKE) have now investigated a new combination therapy that has proven highly effective in their infection model. (2021-02-04)

Fecal microbiota transplants help patients with advanced melanoma respond to immunotherapy
For patients with cancers that do not respond to immunotherapy drugs, adjusting the composition of microorganisms in the intestines--known as the gut microbiome--through the use of stool, or fecal, transplants may help some of these individuals respond to the immunotherapy drugs, a new study suggests. Researchers at the NCI, part of the National Institutes of Health, conducted the study in collaboration with investigators from UPMC Hillman Cancer Center at the University of Pittsburgh. (2021-02-04)

Engineering immunity
University of New Mexico researchers study the use of virus-like particles to create a stable and effective malaria vaccine. (2021-02-03)

Liver cancer 'signature' in gut holds clues to cancer risk
People with non-alcohol-related liver cancer have a unique gut microbiome profile which could help predict disease risk, a new UNSW Sydney study has found. (2021-02-03)

Racial disparities: Young, Black adults had significantly worse heart transplant outcomes
Young, Black adults (ages 18-30) are more than twice as likely to die in the first year after a heart transplant compared to non-Black transplant recipients who are the same age. By age 61 and older, there was no significant racial disparity in the health outcomes among heart transplantation recipients. (2021-02-02)

Combining PD-1inhibitor with VEGF inhibitor in chemotherapy of cholangiocarcinoma patient
Cholangiocarcinoma is the second most frequent liver cancer. Many patients miss the opportunity of having a surgery performed on them and its control has always been considered difficult. Here, doctors from The Affiliated Brain Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University (Guangzhou Huiai Hospital), Guangzhou, China, present a case of stage 4 cholangiocarcinoma. (2021-02-02)

International research network identifies triggers for severe course of liver cirrhosis
Acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF) is a common cause of death in patients with cirrhosis. In ACLF the progressive loss of function of the scarred liver can no longer be compensated (acute decompensation). As a result, other organs such as the kidney or brain fail. The triggers for acute decompensation of liver cirrhosis and an ACLF are most frequently bacterial infections, liver inflammation caused by alcohol, or a combination of both factors. (2021-02-02)

Study introduces mRNA-LNP as a safe therapeutic intervention for liver regeneration
When severely or chronically injured, the liver loses its ability to regenerate. A new study led by researchers at the Center for Regenerative Medicine at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) and Boston Medical Center (BMC) now describes a safe new potential therapeutic tool for the recovery of liver function in chronic and acute liver diseases. (2021-01-27)

A stem cell based cell culture model for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease
Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a widespread condition in the Western World. In order to improve our understanding of the basic mechanisms underlying the etiology of NAFLD, Dr. Nina Graffmann, Prof. James Adjaye and the team of the Institute for Stem Cell research and Regenerative Medicine, University Hospital Duesseldorf, differentiated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from healthy donors and NAFLD patients into hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs). (2021-01-25)

The liver processes coconut oil differently than rapeseed oil
Coconut oil has increasingly found its way into German kitchens in recent years, although its alleged health benefits are controversial. Scientists at the University of Bonn have now been able to show how it is metabolized in the liver. Their findings could also have implications for the treatment of certain diarrheal diseases. The results are published in the journal Molecular Metabolism. (2021-01-25)

ACSL1 as a main catalyst of CoA conjugation of propionic acid-class NSAIDs in liver
Researchers from Kanazawa University have found that propionic acid-class nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), including ibuprofen, form ''conjugates'' with coenzyme A (CoA) by one of the acyl-CoA synthetases, ACSL1, in liver. These conjugates have the covalent binding ability to cellular proteins that may lead to liver injury, a rare severe side effect of NSAID treatment. This knowledge could help pharmaceutical companies to generate pain control options with fewer risks of severe side effects. (2021-01-22)

CT identifies patients with high-risk nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD)
According to ARRS' American Journal of Roentgenology, Fibrosis-4 and multiple CT findings can identify patients with high-risk nonalcoholic fatty liver disease--advanced fibrosis or cirrhosis, that is--though the presence of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis remains elusive on CT. (2021-01-22)

Hematopoietic stem cell transplants may provide long-term benefit for people with MS
A new study shows that intense immunosuppression followed by a hematopoietic stem cell transplant may prevent disability associated with multiple sclerosis (MS) from getting worse in 71% of people with relapsing-remitting MS for up to 10 years after the treatment. The research is published in the January 20, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study also found that in some people their disability improved over 10 years after treatment. (2021-01-20)

Researchers study what happens to your body during tailgating
Football watch parties are synonymous with eating fatty foods and drinking alcohol. Have you ever wondered what all of that eating and drinking does to your body? Researchers from the University of Missouri School of Medicine simulated a tailgating situation with a small group of overweight but healthy men and examined the impact of the eating and drinking on their livers using blood tests and a liver scan. (2021-01-20)

CRISPR technology to cure sickle cell disease at UIC
The first cases treated with gene-editing technology were recently published in an article co-authored by Dr. Damiano Rondelli, the Michael Reese Professor of Hematology at the UIC College of Medicine. The article reports two patients have been cured of beta thalassemia and sickle cell disease after their own genes were edited with CRISPR-Cas9 technology. The two researchers who invented this technology received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 2020. (2021-01-20)

Armouring anti-cancer T cells against immunosuppressants
New 'armoured' T cells attack cancer without being suppressed by drugs given to transplant patients to avoid organ rejection. (2021-01-18)

Scoring system to redefine how U.S. patients prioritized for liver transplant
Researchers with Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine are collaborating with faculty at the University of Pennsylvania to develop a risk score that more comprehensively prioritizes liver cancer patients for transplantation. (2021-01-13)

Hope for children with rare heart condition: novel stem cell therapy to save the day
In a new study, scientists at Okayama University isolated cardiac stem cells and assessed their potential use as regenerative therapy in young patients with cardiac defects. They confirmed the safety and effectiveness of their proposed treatment in early-phase trials and even identified the mechanism through which the stem cells improved cardiac function. Based on these preliminary findings, they hope to proceed to larger clinical trials and move towards pharmaceutical approval in the future. (2021-01-12)

Non-Hispanic Black patients are disproportionately left off liver transplant waitlists
A new study of liver transplant centers confirms that non-Hispanic white patients get placed on liver transplant waitlists at disproportionately higher rates than non-Hispanic Black patients. (2021-01-11)

How the circadian clock regulates liver genes in time and space
EPFL scientists have carried out the first comprehensive study of how genes in the liver perform their metabolic functions in both space and time of day. Monitoring almost 5000 genes at the level of the individual cell across a 24-hour period, the researchers have modelled how the circadian clock and liver functions crosstalk throughout the day in sync with the feeding-fasting cycle. (2021-01-11)

IU research findings could reduce treatment-related complication for blood cancer patients
Researchers at the Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Comprehensive Cancer Center published promising findings today in the New England Journal of Medicine on preventing a common complication to lifesaving blood stem cell transplantation in leukemia. (2021-01-07)

COVID-19 outcomes for patients on immunosuppressive drugs on par with non- immunosuppressed patients
People taking immunosuppressive drugs to prevent organ transplant rejection or to treat inflammatory or autoimmune diseases do not fare worse than others on average when they are hospitalized with COVID-19. (2021-01-07)

Liver cancer cells manipulate stromal cells involved in fibrosis to promote tumor growth
Researchers led by Osaka University have found that liver cancer cells induce autophagy in hepatic stellate cells, causing them to produce a growth factor called GDF15 that promotes tumor growth. GDF15 was more highly expressed in tumor tissue than normal liver tissue, and patients with higher levels of GDF15 had a poorer prognosis. New therapies targeting GDF15 may help prevent the development and proliferation of hepatocellular carcinoma. (2021-01-06)

Study explains why patients with cancer spread to the liver have worse outcomes
A new study finds that tumors in the liver siphon off critical immune cells, rendering immunotherapy ineffective. But coupling immunotherapy with radiotherapy to the liver in mice restored the immune cell function and led to better outcomes. (2021-01-04)

New clues on why pregnancy may increase risk of organ transplant rejection
A research study at the University of Chicago has found that in pregnancy, while the T cell response to a fetus becomes tolerant to allow for successful pregnancy, the part of the immune system that produces antibodies (known as the humoral response) becomes sensitized, creating memory B cells that can later contribute to the rejection of a transplanted organ. (2021-01-04)

Frailty is a factor in higher mortality for women awaiting liver transplants
Women awaiting liver transplants in the United States are known to be about one-third more likely than men to become too ill to undergo surgery or die before receiving a liver. Now a study headed by UC San Francisco and Columbia University highlights the role that frailty plays in this gender gap. (2020-12-30)

Liquid bandage detects tissue oxygenation without the drawbacks of wired oximeters
A paint-on, transparent bandage containing phosphorescent materials reads the amount of oxygen reaching transplanted tissue -- a critical component of a transplant's success. Existing oximeter technology is complicated to use, restricts patients' movements, and is subject to false alarms. The first human trial of the liquid bandage in women undergoing breast reconstruction after cancer found that it performed as well as a wired oximeter device, the current clinical standard. (2020-12-22)

Virtual kidney transplant evaluation allows patients to be evaluated from home
A virtual telehealth platform is allowing the surgery program at the Medical University of South Carolina to evaluate and wait-list patients for kidney transplantation despite reductions in direct, in-person health care visits brought about by the COVID-19 pandemic. (2020-12-21)

New study: available drugs can prevent rejection and tissue injury after transplantation
Controlling inflammation after transplantation of organs, cells, or tissues is critical for graft survival; however, it can be difficult. Continuing injuries due to chronic rejection can be particularly problematic. Now, a team of researchers from Albert Einstein College of Medicine report that neutralizing the cell signaling molecule, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), can prevent cascades of injurious molecules and signals after cell transplantation in The American Journal of Pathology, published by Elsevier. (2020-12-21)

Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.