Current Liver Transplantation News and Events | Page 25

Current Liver Transplantation News and Events, Liver Transplantation News Articles.
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Chinese researchers report first lung stem cell transplantation clinical trial
A research team from Tongji University in China have made a breakthrough in human lung regeneration technology. For the first time, researchers have regenerated patients' damaged lungs using autologous lung stem cell transplantation in a pilot clinical trial. The study can be found in the open-access journal Protein & Cell which is published by Springer Nature. (2018-02-09)

Blood test plus ultrasound boosts liver cancer detection by 40 percent
Combining ultrasound imaging with a blood test for high alpha fetoprotein (AFP) levels improves detection of early-stage liver cancer by as much as 40 percent, researchers at UT Southwestern's Simmons Cancer Center found. (2018-02-09)

Study shows liver cells with whole genome duplications protect against cancer
Researchers at the Children's Medical Center Research Institute (CRI) at UT Southwestern have discovered that cells in the liver with whole genome duplications, known as polyploid cells, can protect the liver against cancer. (2018-02-09)

Peptide improves glucose and insulin sensitivity, lowers weight in mice
Treating obese mice with catestatin (CST), a peptide naturally occurring in the body, showed significant improvement in glucose and insulin tolerance and reduced body weight, report University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers. (2018-02-08)

iPS cell-derived inner ear cells may improve congenital hearing loss
A Japanese research group has successfully grafted human iPS cell-derived inner ear cells that express human-derived proteins into the inner ears of embryonic mice. Hereditary hearing loss accounts for about half of all congenital hearing loss cases, and this work is a major contribution toward research that targets the embryonic inner ear. (2018-02-08)

Search for genetically stable bioengineered gut and liver tissue takes step forward
Before medical science can bioengineer human organs in a lab for therapeutic use, two remaining hurdles are ensuring genetic stability -- so the organs are free from the risk of tumor growth -- and producing organ tissues of sufficient volume and size for viable transplant into people. Scientists report in Stem Cell Reports achieving both goals with a new production method for bioengineered human gut and liver tissues. (2018-02-08)

Recreating liver tumors as organoids for faster, more accurate drug screening
A major challenge in developing liver cancer drugs is that preclinical testing occurs in tumor models that do not accurately reflect human tumor features, causing drug candidates to later fail in clinical testing. Now, Singaporean researchers have grown organoids from liver tumors on specially engineered 3-D scaffolds. These organoids replicate important features of the original tumor, including genetic changes and intra-tumor heterogeneity, and could serve as tumor avatars for high-throughput drug screening. (2018-02-07)

Scientists discover off-switch for 'molecular machine' active in many diseases
A discovery by Queensland scientists could be the key to stopping damage caused by uncontrolled inflammation in a range of common diseases including liver disease, Alzheimer's and gout. University of Queensland researchers have uncovered how an inflammation process automatically switches off in healthy cells, and are now investigating ways to stop it manually when it goes awry. (2018-02-06)

Mouse study reveals what happens in the gut after too much fructose
Princeton University researchers report that in mice, fructose, a sugar found in fruit, is processed mainly in the small intestine, not in the liver as had previously been suspected. Sugary drinks and processed high-sugar foods overwhelm the small intestine and spill into the liver for processing. Additionally, the authors learned that the ability of the small intestine to process fructose is higher after a meal. The work appears Feb. 6 in the journal Cell Metabolism. (2018-02-06)

Starving liver cancer
Scientists at the University of Delaware and the University of Illinois at Chicago have found a new way to kill liver cancer cells and inhibit tumor growth. This research could accelerate the development of new treatments for liver cancer, which is currently difficult to cure. (2018-02-06)

Moffitt researchers identify new target to reduce risk of GVHD
Moffitt Cancer Center researchers are trying to identify new drug targets to reduce the risk of GVHD. Their new study, published last week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, shows a drug that targets the protein JAK2 may reduce the risk of GVHD. (2018-02-05)

Practical hair regeneration technology
Researchers have developed a method for the mass preparation of cellular aggregates, also known as 'hair follicle germs (HFGs)', that may lead to a new treatment for hair loss. (2018-02-01)

Stealth virus for cancer therapy
Scientists from the University of Zurich have redesigned an adenovirus for use in cancer therapy. To achieve this they developed a new protein shield that hides the virus and protects it from being eliminated. Adapters on the surface of the virus enable the reconstructed virus to specifically infect tumor cells. (2018-01-31)

Deaths from liver cancer nearly double since the 1990s, new figures reveal
Over the last two decades, deaths caused by liver cancer have increased by 80 percent, making it one of the fastest-growing causes of cancer deaths worldwide. (2018-01-31)

Could the biological clock be a key ally in the fight against inflammatory disease?
What if the symptoms and seriousness of certain inflammatory diseases were linked to time of day? Researchers from Inserm have been working on this hypothesis, after noting that the seriousness and mortality associated with fulminant hepatitis were dependent on the time at which the disease was induced. Their study, conducted on human cells and mice, shows that the anti-inflammatory action of a biological clock protein could prevent the onset of fulminant hepatitis, by alleviating symptoms and increasing survival rates. (2018-01-26)

Method assesses how well dialysis clinics refer patients for transplantation
A new method is useful for assessing how well individual dialysis facilities are referring patients for kidney transplantation. When the method was applied to dialysis facilities in Georgia, researchers found that most of the variation in referrals for transplantation were due to characteristics within the dialysis facilities rather than patient characteristics. (2018-01-25)

Racial and ethnic disparities in live donor kidney transplants
Despite efforts over the past two decades to increase the number of black and Hispanic patients receiving kidney transplants from related or unrelated living donors, these racial/ethnic minority patients are still much less likely to undergo such transplants than white patients, Johns Hopkins researchers report. In fact, the investigators say, the disparities have worsened in the last 20 years. (2018-01-23)

Not just a stem cell marker
The protein CD34 is predominantly regarded as a marker of blood-forming stem cells but it helps with migration to the bone marrow too. (2018-01-22)

Powerful food-derived antioxidant can halt, prevent fatty liver disease in mice
As obesity continues to rise in the US, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become a major public health issue, increasingly leading to cancer and liver transplants. (2018-01-22)

Alcohol consumption in late teens can lead to liver problems in adulthood
Alcohol is the leading cause of liver cirrhosis and liver-related deaths. Results of a large long-term study in Sweden have confirmed that drinking during late adolescence could be the first step towards liver problems in adulthood and that guidelines for safe alcohol intake in men might have to be revised downwards, reports the Journal of Hepatology. (2018-01-21)

AI 'scientist' finds that toothpaste ingredient may help fight drug-resistant malaria
An ingredient commonly found in toothpaste could be employed as an anti-malarial drug against strains of malaria parasite that have grown resistant to one of the currently used drugs. This discovery, led by researchers at the University of Cambridge, was aided by Eve, an artificially intelligent 'robot scientist.' (2018-01-18)

Hepatitis therapy: Kupffer cells adjust the balance between pathogen control and hepatocyte regenera
Scientists from TWINCORE have now published new insights on the processes involved in liver inflammation in the Journal of Hepatology: Type I interferons, on the one hand, limit viral replication and thereby help the immune cells to control the viral pathogen. On the other hand, type I interferons delay the regeneration of immune cells, which are important to adjust and maintain the immune balance within the liver during acute inflammation. (2018-01-17)

The HLF gene protects blood stem cells by maintaining them in a resting state
The HLF gene is necessary for maintaining our blood stem cells in a resting state, which is crucial for ensuring normal blood production. This has been shown by a new research study from Lund University in Sweden published in Cell Reports. (2018-01-16)

Magnetically applied MicroRNAs could one day help relieve constipation
Micro metal beads and magnets help deliver a biologic where it's needed to improve constipation or rectoanal incontinence in animal models of the disorders. (2018-01-16)

Scarring molecule in fat tissue links obesity with distressed fat
The fat of obese people becomes distressed, scarred and inflamed, which can make weight loss more difficult, research at the University of Exeter has found. (2018-01-12)

Radiation therapy algorithm could reduce side effects, maintain effect against tumors
A mathematical model for computing radiation therapy treatments could substantially reduce patient side effects while delivering the same results as conventional radiation therapy. (2018-01-05)

Cellular barcoding helps scientists understand the behavior of stem cells
By tagging bone marrow cells of mice with a genetic label, or barcode, researchers were able to track and describe the family tree of individual blood cells as they form in their natural environment. (2018-01-03)

Stem cell transplant for severe scleroderma improves survival, quality of life
Clinical trial findings show that a regimen involving transplantation of a person's own blood-forming stem cells can improve survival for people with severe scleroderma, a life-threatening autoimmune disease. Myeloablative autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) includes chemotherapy and radiation to destroy the bone marrow then transplanting the person's own blood-forming stem cells to reconstitute the marrow and immune system. The NIH-funded study found myeloablative HSCT to be superior to treatment with the immune-suppressing drug cyclophosphamide. (2018-01-03)

Racial, ethnic disparities persist for patients in receiving kidney transplants from live donors
Black and Hispanic patients are less likely than white patients to receive a live donor kidney after two years on a waiting list, with an increase in disparity over the last two decades. (2018-01-02)

Educational video may increase public willingness to become face transplant donors
After watching a brief educational video, members of the public are more likely to say they would be willing to donate a facial transplant to a severely disfigured patient, reports a study in the January issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS). (2018-01-02)

Hormone therapy combination may benefit health without increasing cancer risk
A team led by University of Illinois food science and human nutrition professor Zeynep Madak-Erdogan found that treating ovariectomized mice with a combination of conjugated estrogens and the drug bazedoxifene improved metabolism and prevented the weight gain often associated with low estrogen levels without posing increased risk to their reproductive tissues. (2017-12-22)

Patients have an important voice in shaping kidney disease research and treatment
In an effort to provide patients the opportunity to share practical health consumer perspectives, the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (CJASN) is including Patient Voice editorials that will accompany certain journal articles. In the first editorial, Paul T. Conway, a past recipient of the ASN President's medal, highlights 2 CJASN articles that focus on patient comprehension of how treatments align with their individual interests. (2017-12-21)

New guidelines aim to prevent medics from failing to diagnose patients with liver disease
New recommendations, led by experts at the University of Birmingham, have been published to improve the use of liver blood tests. (2017-12-20)

Should uninfected patients accept hepatitis C-infected livers to reduce waiting time?
A modeling study by Massachusetts General Hospital investigators finds that the availability of directly-acting antiviral drugs to treat hepatitis C virus infection could allow the transplantation of livers from HCV-positive donors into HCV-negative recipients without posing undue risk. (2017-12-19)

Tiny bilirubin-filled capsules could improve survival of transplanted pancreatic cells
By encapsulating bilirubin within tiny nanoparticles, researchers from North Carolina State University and the Ohio State University have improved the survival rates of pancreatic islet cells in vitro in a low-oxygen environment. The work has implications for the treatment of Type 1 diabetes in both canine and human patients. (2017-12-18)

Liver cancer: Lipid synthesis promotes tumor formation
Lipid, also known as fat, is an optimal energy source and an important cell component. Much is required for the rapid and uncontrolled growth of cancer cells. Researchers from the Biozentrum of the University of Basel and from the University of Geneva have now discovered that the protein mTOR stimulates the production of lipids in liver tumors to satisfy the increased nutrient turnover and energy needs of cancer cells among other functions. (2017-12-11)

Scientists discover new way to help nerve regeneration in spinal cord injury
A new way of triggering nerve regeneration to help repair spinal cord injury and in the longer-term potentially paralysis has successfully been demonstrated by University of Bristol scientists. The work is published in PLOS ONE today. (2017-12-11)

Immunotherapy drug nearly eliminates severe acute graft-versus-host disease
Results from a phase 2 clinical trial, presented by Seattle Children's Research Institute at the 59th American Society of Hematology (ASH) Annual Meeting, show that the drug Abatacept (Orencia) nearly eliminated life-threatening severe acute graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) in patients receiving hematopoietic stem cell transplants. (2017-12-09)

Long-term prevention of organ rejection
The Konstanz immunologist Professor Marcus Groettrup and his team have developed a procedure for preventing organ rejection in rats after renal transplantation, and for suppressing the creation of antibodies in the recipients' immune systems. Immunoproteasome inhibition, which suppresses the production of antibodies, is crucial to this process. The research results were published in Kidney International. The title of the original publication is: 'Immunoproteasome inhibition prevents chronic antibody-mediated allograft rejection in renal transplantation.' (2017-12-08)

Novel harvesting method rapidly produces superior stem cells for transplantation
A new method of harvesting stem cells for bone marrow transplantation -- developed by a team of investigators from the Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center and the Harvard Stem Cell Institute -- may make the donation process more convenient and less unpleasant for donors while providing cells that are superior to those acquired by current protocols. (2017-12-07)

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