Current Liver Transplantation News and Events | Page 3

Current Liver Transplantation News and Events, Liver Transplantation News Articles.
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Eating less suppresses liver cancer due to fatty liver
Liver cancer from too much fat accumulation in the liver has been increasing in many countries including Japan. In order to change this unfortunate state of affairs, it is important to improve the prognosis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Fatty liver is often improved through eating less, getting more exercise, and reducing body weight. The research group posed the question, ''Can eating less also suppress liver cancer caused by fatty liver?'' (2020-10-29)

Paracetamol poisonings up
In 2003, the painkiller paracetamol became available in Switzerland in tablets with a higher dose of the active ingredient. This correlates with an increase in cases of paracetamol poisoning in the country, as a data analysis by ETH researchers shows. (2020-10-28)

Baking soda treatment may help prevent leukemia relapse after stem cell transplants
Scientists have discovered that sodium bicarbonate - also known as baking soda or bicarbonate of soda - can reprogram T cells in leukemia patients to resist the immune-suppressing effects of cancer cells, which can drive leukemia relapse after stem cell transplants. (2020-10-28)

Surprising players in acute liver failure point to potential treatment
Gut microbes and host cells jointly contribute to the progression of this mostly incurable disease. (2020-10-27)

Ontario should vaccinate newborns for hepatitis B, study suggests
Not all pregnant women are universally screened for hepatitis B virus (HBV) in Ontario, even though this screening is recommended, and the majority of those who test positive do not receive follow-up testing or interventions, leading to infections of newborns, found new research in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2020-10-26)

Liver cancer diagnoses and deaths impacted by geography and household income
An analysis of information from a large U.S. cancer database indicates that patients with liver cancer from rural regions and lower income households often have more advanced cancer at the time of diagnosis and face a higher risk of death compared with other patients. The findings are published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society (ACS). (2020-10-26)

Poverty linked to higher risk of death in children with cancer undergoing transplant
Despite the increasing use and promise of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) as curative therapy for children with cancer and other life-threatening diseases, new research suggests that children transplanted for cancer are more likely to die from treatment-related complications if they live in poorer neighborhoods. The study, published today in the journal Blood, also found that having Medicaid versus private insurance, another marker of poverty, was associated with a higher chance of dying. (2020-10-26)

Study reveals details behind transplant disparities experienced by black patients
In an analysis of information on patients with kidney failure, Black patients are less likely than white patients to be placed on transplant waiting lists. For patients on such lists, Blacks are less likely to receive transplants than whites. Results from the study will be presented online during ASN Kidney Week 2020 Reimagined October 19-October 25. (2020-10-25)

Gut bacteria linked to weight gain following chemotherapy treatment for breast cancer
A new study suggests that gut bacteria are partially responsible for metabolic changes that lead to weight gain following chemotherapy treatment. If the composition of intestinal bacteria may predict which women will gain weight as a result of chemotherapy, researchers say they eventually hope to identify women at risk of gaining weight and offer methods to prevent it. (2020-10-21)

The road to uncovering a novel mechanism for disposing of misfolded proteins
The discovery of the cause of a rare liver disease in babies led to uncovering a novel cellular mechanism for disposing of misfolded proteins that has implications for neurodegenerative conditions of older age (2020-10-20)

Natural killer cells also have a memory function
Good news for the human immune system: researchers from MedUni Vienna's Departments of Dermatology and Surgery have managed to ascribe an immunological memory function to a subset of cytotoxic NK cells, which have hitherto been regarded as antigen-non-specific. (2020-10-19)

Immune activation in the liver illuminated with new glycan-tagging strategy
A signaling system implicated in liver fibrosis and immune activation is better understood thanks to this creative chemical fishing lure. (2020-10-19)

Octopus-inspired sucker transfers thin, delicate tissue grafts and biosensors
Thin tissue grafts and flexible electronics have a host of applications for wound healing, regenerative medicine and biosensing. A new device inspired by an octopus's sucker rapidly transfers delicate tissue or electronic sheets to the patient, overcoming a key barrier to clinical application, according to researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and collaborators. (2020-10-16)

Study shows main cell type in the liver has key role in defending against some viruses
Scientists at Scripps Research have uncovered an important disease-fighting role for cells called hepatocytes, which constitute most of the liver. The discovery could potentially be harnessed to develop new medicines for viral illnesses. (2020-10-16)

Study shows proof of concept of BioIVT HEPATOPAC cultures with targeted assay to evaluate bioactivation potential and drug-induced liver injury (DILI) risk
New in vitro Bioactivation Liver Response Assay used HEPATOPAC model to demonstrate utility of in vitro transcriptomic signature-based strategy in preclinical DILI risk assessment. (2020-10-12)

Even mild fatty liver disease is linked to increased mortality
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, NAFLD, affects nearly one in four adults in Europe and the U.S. Earlier research has demonstrated an increased risk of death in patients with NAFLD and advanced fibrosis or cirrhosis. Now, researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden and Massachusetts General Hospital in the U.S. show that mortality increases with disease severity, but even mild fatty liver disease is linked to higher mortality. The findings have been published in the journal Gut. (2020-10-12)

The world's first successful identification and characterization of in vivo senescent cells
A research team led by Professor Makoto Nakanishi of the Institute of Medical Science, the University of Tokyo, generated a p16-Cre ERT2 -tdTomato mouse model to characterize in vivo p16 high cells at the single-cell level. They found tdTomato-positive p16 high cells detectable in all organs, which were enriched with age. They also found that these cells failed to proliferate and had half-lives ranging from 2.6 to 4.2 months, depending on the tissue examined. (2020-10-07)

Hearts harvested from pigs may soon help solve chronic shortages of these donor organs
An analysis discusses scientific breakthroughs that have overcome obstacles to cardiac xenotransplantation. (2020-10-07)

Effects of acute and chronic graft-versus-myelodysplastic syndrome on long-term outcomes following a
A research group led by Assistant Professor Takaaki Konuma in the Department of Hematology/Oncology, the Hospital of the Institute of Medical Science, the University of Tokyo (IMSUT Hospital) has demonstrated a graft-versus-tumor (GVT) effect of a previously unknown/novel allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation in MDS patients. In addition, they succeeded in identifying a category of patients for whom the GVT effect was identified. (2020-10-06)

A small switch with a big impact
Minor changes in immune cells can significantly affect the immune response, scientists of the University of W├╝rzburg have now discovered. Their findings could be relevant for stem cell therapy. (2020-10-05)

Nanoparticles can turn off genes in bone marrow cells
Using specialized nanoparticles, MIT engineers have developed a way to turn off specific genes in cells of the bone marrow, which play an important role in producing blood cells. (2020-10-05)

New artificial intelligence models show potential for predicting outcomes
New applications of artificial intelligence (AI) in health care settings have shown early success in improving survival and outcomes in traffic accident victims transported by ambulance and in predicting survival after liver transplantation. (2020-10-03)

Could a poo transplant one day be the secret of eternal youth?
Poo transplants could one day be used to restore cognitive decline among the elderly - according to new research. A new study published today shows how faecal transplants from older to younger mice altered their gut microbiome, which in turn impacted their spatial learning and memory. The research team hope the reverse could also be true, and one day used as a therapy to restore cognitive function in older people. (2020-10-02)

Cancer immunotherapy 'uniquely suppressed' by liver tumors
Though cancer immunotherapy has become a promising standard-of-care treatment--and in some cases, perhaps a cure--for a wide variety of different cancers, it doesn't work for everyone, and researchers have increasingly turned their attention to understanding why. (2020-10-02)

AGA releases largest report on safety and effectiveness of fecal microbiota transplantation
Today, the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) released the first results from the NIH-funded AGA Fecal Microbiota Transplantation (FMT) National Registry, the largest real-world study on the safety and effectiveness of FMT. Published in Gastroenterology, the registry reported that FMT led to a cure of Clostridioides difficile (C. difficile) infection in 90% of patients across 20 North American FMT practice sites. Few serious side effects were reported. (2020-10-01)

Skoltech scientists discovered a new biomarker for liver cancer diagnosis
A group of Skoltech scientists led by a Skoltech and MSU professor Olga Dontsova discovered a novel liver-specific non-coding RNA. The researchers tracked the RNA amounts in a healthy liver and that affected by carcinogenesis and suggested using the RNA as a biomarker, thus creating a new panel of potential biomarkers for postoperative diagnosis of various liver cancers. (2020-09-30)

The heat is on for building 3D artificial organ tissues
Bioengineers have devised a technology that uses heat to remotely control the positioning and timing of cell functions to build 3-dimensional, artificial, living tissues. They designed 3-D printed fluid systems to supply penetrating heat, which allows them to manipulate the genetic wiring of cells deep in artificial tissues. Their vision for the future is to try to find ways to direct cells to form complex artificial organs that assume some functions of damaged livers. (2020-09-30)

Senescent cells may be good when it comes to a bad injury
It's called senescence, when stressed cells can no longer divide to make new cells, and it's considered a factor in aging and in some diseases. Now scientists have some of the first evidence that at a younger age at least, senescent cells show up quickly after a major injury and are protective. (2020-09-29)

Study finds lung transplant patients not given antifungal preventive drugs have higher risk of death
Antifungal preventive medications reduce mortality risk by half in the first year following lung transplantation, according to Mayo Clinic research involving 667 patients who received lung transplants from 2005 to 2018. (2020-09-23)

URI grad student finds PFAS in seabirds from Narragansett Bay, Massachusetts Bay, Cape Fear
A recent study by a University of Rhode Island graduate student researching PFAS exposure found high levels of the compounds in seabirds from offshore Massachusetts and coastal Rhode Island and North Carolina adding to the accumulating pile of evidence related to human and animal exposure to these chemical compounds. (2020-09-23)

Predicting the future of liver-safe drugs
Researchers at Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) working with an international team have developed a Polygenic Risk Score using previous genomic studies that may help predict drug-induced liver injury. This score was validated on genomic data, cell cultures and organoids for several potentially hepatotoxic drugs, and may inform a screening test that can predict adverse responses both to approved medications in clinical practice as well as to drug candidates in preliminary experimental trials. (2020-09-18)

The hormone glucagon may be a warning light for diabetes
Researchers from the University of Copenhagen are introducing a new biological concept in the fight against diabetes: glucagon resistance. Glucagon resistance or decreased sensitivity to the hormone glucagon increases the risk of type 2 diabetes. New research shows that glucagon resistance is particularly pronounced in people with fatty liver, and this may be the key to understanding the link between fatty liver and diabetes. (2020-09-17)

Super-potent blood stem cells discovered in human embryos
In research recently published in Stem Cell Reports, Andrejs Ivanovs, Alexander Medvinsky (a.medvinsky@ed.ac.uk) and colleagues from the University of Edinburgh discovered that HSCs from early human embryos, when HSCs are just starting to form, are more robust at expanding than those from the cord blood. (2020-09-17)

Fructose and glucose in high fructose corn syrup deliver a one-two punch to health
Consuming high fructose corn syrup appears to be as bad for your health as consuming sugar in the form of fructose alone, according to a new study from researchers at the University of California, Davis. The study reports health risks related to the type of sugar consumed, but also reveals novel risks when sugars are combined, which has important implications for dietary guidelines. (2020-09-17)

Detection of PCBs and their metabolites (OH-PCBs) in the fetal brain of a Japanese macaque
This study selected the Japanese macaque (Macaca fuscata) as a model animal for the fetal transfer of OH-PCBs in humans, and revealed OH-PCB concentrations and their relationships in the maternal and fetal brains. The key finding from this study is that OH-PCBs can reach the developing brain of the fetus as early as the first trimester of pregnancy. These OH-PCBs may exceed the levels that induce adverse effects on neurodevelopment. (2020-09-14)

Consumption of sheep or beef liver can contribute considerably to the total intake of PFAS
Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are industrial chemicals that have been used for decades in several industrial processes and consumer products due to their special technical properties. They are not easily degradable and are detectable everywhere: in the environ-ment, in the food chain and in humans. (2020-09-14)

Researchers discover gene that could decrease likelihood of developing alcoholic cirrhosis
Researchers at Indiana University School of Medicine are learning more about how a person's genes play a role in the possibility they'll suffer from alcoholic cirrhosis with the discovery of a gene that could make the disease less likely. (2020-09-11)

Black people more likely than others to die from colorectal cancer spreading to the liver
Colorectal cancer is more prevalent among Black people, a group that has the highest rates of death for an illness that is curable if caught early. (2020-09-09)

Discovery challenges the foundations of gene therapy
An article published today in Science Translational Medicine by scientists from Children's Medical Research Institute has challenged one of the foundations of the gene therapy field and will help to improve strategies for treating serious genetic disorders of the liver. The lessons learned can potentially be extended to other tissues, beyond the liver, making this a very impactful study that will change the trajectory of AAV-based gene therapies. (2020-09-09)

Gene test can predict risk of medications causing liver injury
A team of scientists from Cincinnati Children's, Japan and Europe report in a study published Sept. 7, 2020, in Nature Medicine, identifying a 'polygenic risk score' that shows when a medication poses a risk of liver injury. (2020-09-07)

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