Current Livestock News and Events

Current Livestock News and Events, Livestock News Articles.
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Tweaking corn kernels with CRISPR
Corn has a highly complex genome, making it a challenge to apply genome-editing techniques to it. CSHL Professor David Jackson and postdoctoral fellow Lei Liu used CRISPR to tinker with the corn genome promoter regions and modify stem cell growth. They figured out which sections influence kernel yield, and they hope to make targeted genome-editing in corn more precise and efficient. (2021-02-22)

Increasing temperatures will hit meat and milk production in East Africa
Heat stress will detrimentally impact future livestock production in East Africa without urgent adaptation measures. (2021-02-18)

Wolves prefer to feed on the wild side
When there is a choice, wolves in Mongolia prefer to feed on wild animals rather than grazing livestock. This is the discovery by a research team from the University of Göttingen and the Senckenberg Museum Görlitz. Previous studies had shown that the diet of wolves in inland Central Asia consists mainly of grazing livestock, which could lead to increasing conflict between nomadic livestock herders and wild predatory animals like wolves. The study has been published in the journal Mammalian Biology. (2021-02-18)

Changing livestock in ancient Europe reflect political shifts
In ancient European settlements, livestock use was likely primarily determined by political structure and market demands, according to a study published February 17, 2021 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Ariadna Nieto-Espinet and colleagues of the Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Barcelona. (2021-02-17)

Collapsed glaciers increase third pole uncertainties: Downstream lakes may merge within a decade
According to researchers from the Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research (ITP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, meltwater from ice avalanches has been filling downstream lakes in a way that may cause previously separated lakes to merge within the next decade, thus disrupting the function of ecosystems in the region. (2021-02-09)

Urban agriculture in Chicago does not allow consumers to rely solely on local food
Environmentally conscious consumers try to 'buy local' when food shopping. Now, a study of food raised around Chicago has shown that buying local can't provide all necessary nutrients for area residents, though it could fulfill their needs if some nutrients were supplied as supplements. The researchers report in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology that urban agriculture made little difference in reducing overall land area, and thus distance, required to supply all nutritional needs. (2021-02-03)

Kangaroo overgrazing could be jeopardising land conservation, study finds
The native species has reached numbers that are contributing to drier soil and less vegetation - and may be more damaging to conservation areas than rabbits. (2021-02-03)

Land-use to solve climate change: a focus on livestock
The land sector can strongly contribute to climate change mitigation if sustainable land-use options are applied. A study led by the CMCC Foundation highlights that land-based mitigation options at small-scale landscape level can lead towards carbon neutral livestock systems while providing an additional wide range of ecological, environmental and socio-economic co-benefits at local level. (2021-02-01)

Human activity caused the long-term growth of greenhouse gas methane
Decadal growth rate of methane in the atmosphere varied dramatically over the past 30 yeas with three distinct periods of slowed (1988-1998), quasi-stationary (1999-2006) and renewed (2007-2016) phases. An inverse analysis with atmospheric chemistry transport modeling explained these variations consistently. While emissions from oil and gas exploitation and natural climate events caused the slowed growth and the temporary pause, those from coal mining in China and livestock farming in the tropics drove the renewed growth. (2021-01-29)

Livestock workers face high MRSA risk
For Michigan State University's Felicia Wu, the surprise isn't that people who work with livestock are at higher risk of picking up antibiotic-resistant bacteria, but instead how much higher their risk levels are. (2021-01-28)

Framework sheds light on nitrogen loss of producing common food items
Differences in nitrogen loss intensity between livestock and crops confirm the need for change. (2021-01-13)

New study reveals how fences hinder migratory wildlife in the West
Wildlife biologists at the University of California, Berkeley, combined GPS location data of tagged mule deer and pronghorn antelope with satellite imagery of Wyoming fences to find out just how often these animals encounter fences, and what happens when they do. The results, published on Jan. 7, 2021 in the Journal of Applied Ecology, help pinpoint which fences pose the biggest barrier to ungulates trying to access their ideal habitat. (2021-01-12)

New challenges for wolf conservation
The predator's growing population could cause conflict with keepers of grazing animals and risk several conservation goals. (2021-01-07)

Cattle grazing and soybean yields
Each corn harvest leaves behind leaves, husks and cobs. Research shows cattle can take advantage of this food resource without damaging field productivity. (2021-01-06)

Uncovering how grasslands changed our climate
Grasslands are managed worldwide to support livestock production, while remaining natural or semi-natural ones provide critical services that contribute to the wellbeing of both people and the planet. Human activities are however causing grasslands to become a source of greenhouse gas emissions rather than a carbon sink. A new study uncovered how grasslands used by humans have changed our climate over the last centuries. (2021-01-05)

A no-meat diet everywhere will not solve the climate crisis
Scientists argue Authors further argue that a singular focus on negative livestock-related environmental impacts ignores the critical but more positive role livestock play in ecosystem services, income and asset provision or insurance in low- and middle-income countries. It also overlooks more systemic questions about how animals are raised. (2020-12-16)

Hotspots of cheetah activity is a key to solving the cheetah-farmer conflict in Namibia
New insights into the cheetah's spatial behaviour provide a viable solution to the human-wildlife conflict: In the core areas of male cheetah territories, all local males and females frequently meet to exchange information. Moving their breeding herds out of these hotspots, farmers reduced livestock losses by more than 80 percent. These insights are the result of a close cooperation between scientists from Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) and farmers in central Namibia. (2020-12-07)

Danish researchers develop budget optical ammonia sensor
In collaboration with the Technical University of Denmark (DTU), the Department of Engineering at Aarhus University has developed photonic sensor technology that can pave the way for a portable, reliable and, above all, inexpensive device for detecting ammonia and other gases in agriculture. The new technology has been developed as part of the Ecometa project, which has received DKK 12.5 million funding from Innovation Fund Denmark. (2020-12-01)

Restoration of degraded grasslands can benefit climate change mitigation and key ecosystem services
New research has demonstrated how, in contrast to encroachment by the invasive alien tree species Prosopis julifora (known as `Mathenge` -in Kenya or `Promi` in Baringo), restoration of grasslands in tropical semi-arid regions can both mitigate the impacts of climate change and restore key benefits usually provided by healthy grasslands for pastoralists and agro-pastoralist communities. (2020-11-24)

COVID-19 highlights risks of wildlife trade
Many diseases, such as COVID-19, made the jump from animals to people with serious consequences for the human host. International researchers, including Göttingen University, say that more epidemics resulting from animal hosts are inevitable unless urgent action is taken. To protect against future pandemics, they call for governments to establish effective legislation addressing wildlife trade, protection of habitats and reduction of interaction between people, wildlife and livestock. Their review appeared in Trends in Ecology & Evolution. (2020-11-17)

US agricultural water use declining for most crops and livestock production
Agricultural production and food manufacturing account for a third of water usage in the U.S. Water use fluctuates with weather patterns but is also affected by shifts in production technology, supply-chain linkages, and domestic and foreign consumer demand. A comprehensive University of Illinois study looked at water withdrawals in U.S. agriculture and food production from 1995 to 2010. The main trend was a decline in water use, driven by a combination of factors. (2020-11-16)

What does the fox say to a puma?
The two predator species can successfully share a landscape and hunt for food over the same nighttime hours because they are, in essence, ordering from different menus. (2020-11-13)

Global food system emissions threaten achievement of climate change targets
Even if greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuel use in the global food system were immediately halted, the remaining greenhouse gasses otherwise produced from global food production would make meeting the Paris Agreement's target of limiting temperature increases to 1.5° Celsius (C) above preindustrial levels very difficult, a new study reports. (2020-11-05)

Researchers map genomes of agricultural monsters
The University of Cincinnati is unlocking the genomes of creepy agricultural pests like screwworms that feast on livestock from the inside out and thrips that transmit viruses to plants. (2020-10-28)

Waiter! This soup is not fly
Black Soldier Fly larvae contains more zinc and iron than lean meat and its calcium content is higher than milk. Less than half a hectare of black soldier fly larvae can produce more protein than cattle grazing on around 1200 hectares, or 52 hectares of soybeans. New research has identified the barriers for introducing fly protein into Western human diets as a sustainable, healthy alternative to both meat and plant proteins. (2020-10-28)

Strategic interventions in dairy production in developing countries can help meet growing global demand for milk
Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Livestock Systems hosted the ''MILK Symposium: Improving Milk Production, Quality, and Safety in Developing Countries'' at the 2019 American Dairy Science Association® Annual Meeting to address factors that cause low dairy consumption in low- and middle-income countries and discuss strategies to address them. The Journal of Dairy Science invited speakers to submit articles on topics from the symposium to reach a wider audience. (2020-10-15)

Sicker livestock may increase climate woes
Climate change is affecting the spread and severity of infectious diseases around the world -- and infectious diseases may in turn be contributing to climate change, according to a new paper in Trends in Ecology & Evolution. The research, led by Vanessa Ezenwa, a professor of ecology at the University of Georgia, and funded by the Living Earth Collaborative at Washington University in St. Louis, describes how parasites can cause animals to produce more methane, a powerful greenhouse gas. (2020-10-07)

N2O emissions pose an increasing climate threat, finds breakthrough study
Rising nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions are jeopardizing the climate goals of the Paris Agreement, according to a major new study by an international team of scientists. The growing use of nitrogen fertilizers in the production of food worldwide is increasing atmospheric concentrations of N2O - a greenhouse gas 300 times more potent than carbon dioxide (CO2) that remains in the atmosphere for more than 100 years. (2020-10-07)

Scientists use 'genomic time travel' to discover new genetic traits to breed more productive and resilient African cattle
New study deploys advanced tools to retrace 1,000 years of African pastoralist cattle breeding, identifying traits to help cattle survive blistering heat, drought and advancing diseases. (2020-09-28)

Gene-edited livestock 'surrogate sires' successfully made fertile
For the first time, scientists have created pigs, goats and cattle that can serve as viable 'surrogate sires,' male animals that produce sperm carrying only the genetic traits of donor animals. The advance could speed the spread of desirable characteristics in livestock and improve food production for a growing global population. (2020-09-14)

Bat tick found for the first time in New Jersey
A tick species associated with bats has been reported for the first time in New Jersey and could pose health risks to people, pets and livestock, according to a Rutgers-led study in the Journal of Medical Entomology. This species (Carios kelleyi) is a ''soft'' tick. Deer ticks, which carry Lyme disease, are an example of ''hard'' ticks. (2020-09-09)

Gen Z not ready to eat lab-grown meat
New research by the University of Sydney and Curtin University that will be published on 8 September in Frontiers in Nutrition, found that, despite having a great concern for the environment and animal welfare, 72 percent of Generation Z were not ready to accept cultured meat - defined in the survey as a lab-grown meat alternative produced by in-vitro cell cultures of animal cells, instead of from slaughtered animals. (2020-09-07)

Farmers' quick sale of poultry during outbreaks may increase deadly virus transmission
Small-scale poultry farmers in Vietnam tend to respond to viral outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) by rapidly selling their birds as a way to avoid financial loss, according to a new study by an international team of researchers. As these birds are commingled with other birds in markets and trading networks, this practice may increase the likelihood of widespread disease transmission. (2020-08-28)

Genetics of the tree of life
The African baobab tree (Adansonia digitata) is called the tree of life. Baobab trees can live for more than a thousand years and provide food, livestock fodder, medicinal compounds, and raw materials. USDA scientists counted the significant tree's chromosomes - information critical for conservation, agricultural improvement, and further genetic work. Their findings were published in the journal Scientific Reports. (2020-08-27)

Reducing transmission risk of livestock disease
The risk of transmitting the livestock virus PPRV, which threatens 80% of the world's sheep and goats, increases with certain husbandry practices, including attendance at seasonal grazing camps and the introduction of livestock to the herd. (2020-08-24)

Improving protein digestibility in sorghum
Improving protein digestibility in sorghum (2020-08-19)

Lactobacillus hilgardii LMG 7934 genome deciphered at Kazan Federal University
The team is led by Associate Professor Ayrat Kayumov (Department of Genetics, Kazan Federal University). In this research, the scientists not only performed genome sequencing, but also found a completely new type of PII-Like Protein PotN. (2020-08-19)

Climate change mitigation not the primary motivator in regenerative ranching
Regenerative ranching, a holistic approach to managing grazing lands, enhances ranchers' adaptive capacity and socioeconomic well-being while also providing an opportunity to mitigate climate change. (2020-08-17)

Adding a meter between meals boosts vegetarian appeal -- study
Researchers have identified the optimal dish positions to help ''nudge'' diners into picking more planet-friendly meals in cafeterias. Findings are the latest from Cambridge research on encouraging dietary decision-making that supports sustainable living. (2020-08-13)

Texas A&M researchers developing first oral anthrax vaccine for livestock, wildlife
There may soon be a new weapon in the centuries-old battle against anthrax in wildlife thanks to groundbreaking work at the Texas A&M University College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences. (2020-08-11)

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