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Current Loggerhead Sea Turtle News and Events, Loggerhead Sea Turtle News Articles.
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Thousands of turtles netted off South America
Tens of thousands of sea turtles are caught each year by small-scale fishers off South America's Pacific coast, new research shows. (2018-06-05)

A little water could make a big difference for endangered salmon
A trickle of water flowing through a stream could mean life or death for endangered coho salmon in coastal California. (2018-06-05)

Red tide fossils point to Jurassic sea flood
Dinosaur-age fossilised remains of tiny organisms normally found in the sea have been discovered in inland, arid Australia -- suggesting the area was, for a short time at least, inundated by sea water 40 million years before Australia's large inland sea existed. (2018-06-05)

NASA finds some fragmented strength in Tropical Storm 05W
NASA obtained an infrared look at Tropical Depression 05W as it continued moving through the South China Sea. NASA's Aqua satellite found very cold cloud top temperatures and strong storms in fragmented thunderstorms mostly east of 05W's center. (2018-06-05)

Study in Fiji finds that removing sea cucumbers spells trouble for shallow coastal waters
The sea cucumber's unimpressive appearance belies the outsized role these creatures play in converting decomposing organic matter into recyclable nutrients and keeping coastal ecosystems healthy and clean, and overfishing them can have negative impacts on coastal marine environments, according to a new study focusing on a species of sea cucumber called a sandfish in the journal PeerJ. (2018-06-05)

New NSF special report released ahead of World Oceans Day: Catch a Wave! The Science of Summer

(2018-06-04)

Reconstructing longest American water level, instrumented flood record, in Boston Harbor
Using newly-discovered archival measurements to construct an instrumental record of water levels and storm tides in Boston since 1825, researchers at UMass Amherst and elsewhere report today that local averaged relative sea level rose by nearly a foot (0.28 meters) over the past 200 years, with the greatest increase occurring since 1920. The work also highlights tides and their significant effect on flooding in the city. (2018-06-01)

Invisible barrier on ocean surface can reduce carbon uptake
An invisible layer of biological compounds on the sea surface reduces the rate at which carbon dioxide gas moves between the atmosphere and the oceans, scientists have reported. (2018-05-29)

A new analysis system is able to identify pollutants from cosmetics in seawater
A University of Cordoba study, in partnership with the University of the Balearic Islands, uses carbon-coated titanium dioxide nanotubes to analyze samples affected by parabens from lotions and shampoos. (2018-05-29)

Rise and fall of the Great Barrier Reef
Study is first of its kind to reconstruct evolution of reef over 30,000 years in response to abrupt environmental change. (2018-05-28)

Currents propel the spreading of invasive jellyfish
Twelve years ago, the comb jelly Mnemiopsis leidyi, originating from the North American East Coast, appeared in northern European waters. Based on the first comprehensive data collection on the occurrence of this invasive jellyfish in Europe, scientists from 19 countries led by the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel and Technical University of Denmark have now shown that ocean currents play a key role for this successful invasion. The study has been published in the international journal Global Ecology and Biogeography. (2018-05-25)

Excess nutrients, coupled with climate change, damage the most highly resilient corals
Experimentalists conducted a simulation of future conditions in the Red Sea caused by global warming and acidification, while simultaneously increasing levels of nutrients such as nitrate and phosphate. They found that when nitrate and phosphate were added, the coral thermal resilience was compromised while algal growth benefited from excess CO2 and nutrients. Algal dominance over corals in the reef means losing all of the beauty and biodiversity of the coral reefs. (2018-05-23)

NASA's Aqua satellite sees Tropical Cyclone Mekunu strengthen
Visible satellite imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite revealed that Tropical Cyclone 02A, now renamed Mekunu has continued to consolidate and organize off the coast of Oman in the Arabian Sea. (2018-05-23)

The gypsum gravity chute: A phytoplankton-elevator to the ocean floor
Tiny gypsum crystals can make phytoplankton so heavy that they rapidly sink, hereby transporting large quantities of carbon to the ocean's depths. (2018-05-22)

Japanese student discovers new crustacean species in deep sea hydrothermal vent
A new species of microcrustacean was collected from a submarine hot spring (hydrothermal vent) of a marine volcano (Myojin-sho caldera) in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of Japan. This crustacean group is found only in deep-sea hydrothermal vents and is the first of its kind found in Japanese waters. (2018-05-20)

Major shift in marine life occurred 33 million years later in the South
A new study of marine fossils from Antarctica, Australia, New Zealand and South America reveals that one of the greatest changes to the evolution of life in our oceans occurred more recently in the Southern Hemisphere than previously thought. The results are published today in the journal Communications Biology. (2018-05-17)

The survival of sea birds affected by ocean cycles
In a general context of climate change, researchers at the Centre d'écologie fonctionnelle et évolutive (CNRS/Université de Montpellier/Université Paul Valery/EPHE-PSL) and their international partners revealed the impact of ocean cycles, such as the Pacific decadal oscillation and El Niño, on the survival of the Nazca booby. Their research, which shows for the first time that long cycles directly affect the survival of adult populations, appears in the May edition of Ecology. (2018-05-17)

A shipwreck and an 800-year-old 'made in China' label reveal lost history
Nearly a thousand years ago, a ship sank in the Java Sea near Indonesia. Cargo recovered from the ocean floor -- including the equivalent to a 'Made in China' label on a piece of pottery -- is helping archaeologists reevaluate when the ship went down and how it fits in with China's history. (2018-05-16)

Antarctic seals can help predict ice sheet melt
Two species of seal found in Antarctic seas are helping scientists collect data about the temperature and salinity of waters around vulnerable ice sheets in West Antarctica. Understanding more about how this water gets towards the ice shelves by measuring its temperature, salinity and depth, will help climate change modellers make more accurate predictions about how rapidly the Antarctic ice sheet is melting. (2018-05-15)

437 million tons of fish, $560 billion wasted due to destructive fishing operations
Industrial fisheries that rely on bottom trawling wasted 437 million tonnes of fish and missed out on $560 billion in revenue over the past 65 years, new UBC research has found. (2018-05-15)

Traditional knowledge sheds light on changing East Greenland climate and polar bear hunt
Inuit polar bear hunters in East Greenland report changes to their subsistence hunting patterns as well as polar bear distribution and behavior due to decreasing sea ice and the introduction of hunting quotas in 2006. The study is the first in nearly 20 years to document traditional knowledge in East Greenland -- providing a valuable baseline for monitoring future changes and the polar bear population. (2018-05-15)

Memory transferred between snails
Memories can be transferred between organisms by extracting ribonucleic acid (RNA) from a trained animal and injecting it into an untrained animal, as demonstrated in a study of sea snails published in eNeuro. The research provides new clues in the search for the physical basis of memory. (2018-05-14)

Mapping movements of ocean creatures great and small
Big data shows that large marine vertebrates move differently, but consistently, through coastal and ocean waters. (2018-05-13)

NASA completes survey flights to map Arctic ice
Operation IceBridge, NASA's longest-running airborne mission to monitor polar ice change, concluded this year's springtime survey of Arctic sea and land ice on May 2. The flights, which began on March 22, covered the western basin of the Arctic Ocean and Greenland's fastest-changing glaciers. (2018-05-11)

How turning down the heat makes a baby turtle male
Scientists have started to crack the 50-year-old puzzle of how temperature turns baby turtles male or female. In a study in the journal Science, researchers show that cooler egg incubation temperatures turn up a key gene called Kdm6b in the turtle's immature sex organs. This in turn acts as a biological 'on' switch, activating other genes that allow testes to develop without altering the underlying genetic code. (2018-05-10)

Red Sea fungus yields leads for new epilepsy drugs
New treatments for epilepsy are sorely needed because current medications don't work for many people with the disease. To find new leads, researchers have now turned to the sea -- a source of unique natural products that have been largely untapped for prospective drugs. The scientists report in the journal ACS Chemical Neuroscience that two metabolites produced by a fungus from the Red Sea look promising. (2018-05-09)

The Baltic Sea as a time machine
Warming, acidification, eutrophication, the loss of oxygen -- examples of major changes being observed or expected for the future in coastal zones around the world. These processes are occurring in the Baltic Sea at a much faster pace than in other regions. But the Baltic also provides useful lessons for how negative trends can be reversed by protective measures. In Science Advances, an international team of researchers led by the GEOMAR (Kiel, Germany) promotes the Baltic Sea as a time machine for coastal areas worldwide. (2018-05-09)

The far-reaching effects of ocean floors on the sea surface
Low rises on the ocean floor at a depth of 5,500 meters in the western North Pacific regulate surface flows and create sharp sea surface temperature (SST) fronts, which have tremendous effects on the climate and marine resources. (2018-05-08)

Impacts of windfarm construction on harbor porpoises
Scientists from Germany, Denmark and the UK have built a model tool to predict what happens to marine animals when exposed to noise from the construction and operation of wind farms at sea. (2018-05-07)

Alligators on the beach? Killer whales in rivers? Get used to it
Sightings of alligators and other large predators in places where conventional wisdom says they 'shouldn't be' have increased in recent years, in large part because local populations, once hunted to near-extinction, are rebounding. A new Duke-led paper finds that far from being outliers, these sightings signify the return of highly adaptable predators to prime hunting grounds they occupied long ago -- a trend that opens new opportunities for future conservation. (2018-05-07)

Solar powered sea slugs shed light on search for perpetual green energy
In an amazing achievement akin to adding solar panels to your body, a Northeast sea slug sucks raw materials from algae to provide its lifetime supply of solar-powered energy, according to a study by Rutgers University-New Brunswick and other scientists. (2018-05-03)

The true 'value' of biodiversity
Planning conservation policies to protect biodiversity using single core 'values' such as the 'usefulness' of a species could put 'less useful' species at risk. (2018-05-03)

New species in the North Sea
Experts from the Alfred Wegener Institute and the universities of Oldenburg and Potsdam, Germany have confirmed the existence of a new cryptic amphipod species in the North Sea. (2018-05-02)

Small earthquakes caused by migrating gasses in the underground
The metropolitan area of Istanbul with around 15 million inhabitants is considered to be particularly earthquake-prone. In order to be able to assess the risk correctly, researchers must decipher the processes underground. Below the Marmara Sea, an international research team detected earthquakes that were not directly caused by tectonic stresses but by rising natural gas. (2018-05-01)

Study shows sea turtle nesting beaches threatened by microplastic pollution
Tiny pieces of plastic could be jeopardizing sensitive sea turtle nesting beaches. (2018-05-01)

Researchers study how to improve southern sea otter survival
Analysis of 13 years of demographic and genetic data from 1,006 sea otters to assess multiple effective population size estimators, as well as temporal trends in genetic diversity and population genetic structure, show a need for development of new delisting criteria for the southern sea otter. (2018-05-01)

Effects of munitions in the seas only partially known
More than 70 years after the end of World War II, countless pieces of ammunition from this time are still lying in all oceans. Once the casings are damaged, the explosives can release toxic substances into the seawater. A new review study, published by scientists from the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel and the Schleswig-Holstein Ministry of the Environment points to considerable knowledge gaps regarding the spread and effects of these chemicals on marine ecosystems. (2018-04-30)

La Niña-like ocean cooling patterns intensify northwestern Pacific tropical cyclones
Atmospheric researchers at the University of Hawaii at Mānoa (UH Mānoa) International Pacific Research Center have recently published a study in Scientific Reports that demonstrates a strong connection between sea surface temperature patterns associated with the Global Warming Hiatus and changes in cyclone activity over the northwest Pacific Ocean, particularly increasing intensities in coastal regions of East Asia. (2018-04-30)

Growing 'dead zone' confirmed by underwater robots in the Gulf of Oman
New research reveals a growing 'dead zone' in the Gulf of Oman. Little data has been collected in the area for almost 50 years because of piracy and geopolitical tensions. The area devoid of oxygen was confirmed by underwater robots. Reasearchers found an area larger than Scotland with almost no oxygen left. The environmental disaster is worse than expected with dire consequences for fish and marine plants, plus humans who rely on the oceans for food and employment. (2018-04-27)

Human impact on sea urchin abundance
In a 50-year study, researchers record the dynamics of three common species of sea urchins in Hatakejima Island, Wakayama. (2018-04-25)

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