Current Longevity News and Events | Page 2

Current Longevity News and Events, Longevity News Articles.
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Unlocking the key to an effective vaccine
A recent study by Monash University has looked at the role plasma cells and their longevity play in the effectiveness of vaccines in the body and suggests that components within vaccine design are the key. (2020-07-02)

USC-led study: Protein in mitochondria appears to regulate health and longevity
A new study led by researchers at the USC Leonard Davis School of Gerontology is the first to demonstrate that a tiny protein, humanin, has a big impact on health and longevity in both animals and humans (2020-06-24)

Strenuous daily exercise may shorten, not prolong, longevity
By analyzing longevity data for professional Japanese traditional artists, researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology have found that Kabuki actors, known for their vigorous movements, surprisingly had shorter lifespans compared with other traditional arts performers who lead mostly sedentary lifestyles. The findings suggest that job-related strenuous exercise throughout life may not necessarily extend longevity. (2020-06-18)

Not smoking and being socially active keys to longevity
University of Otago researchers have discovered some of the secrets to longevity with new research revealing not smoking and being social engaged throughout older age are common traits of New Zealand centenarians. (2020-06-17)

Honeybee lives shortened after exposure to two widely used pesticides
The lives of honeybees are shortened -- with evidence of physiological stress -- when they are exposed to the suggested application rates of two commercially available and widely used pesticides. (2020-06-16)

Diabetic mice improve with retrievable millimeter-thick cell-laden hydrogel fiber
Researchers from The University of Tokyo developed a novel fiber-shaped hydrogel transplant for the treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus. They showed that pancreatic cells encapsulated in 1.0-mm-thick hydrogel fibers normalized blood glucose levels in diabetic mice while being protected from foreign body reactions. These findings help facilitate cell-based therapies for type 1 diabetes mellitus. (2020-06-15)

Nutraceuticals for promoting longevity
The review, published in Current Nutraceuticals, offers a special focus on the nutraceuticals that impact insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor signaling and sirtuin activity in mediating longevity and healthspan. (2020-06-10)

Switching from aluminum to zinc alloys could improve sustainability of automotive parts
A new study reveals that switching from aluminum to zinc alloys in the production of automotive parts could greatly enhance their longevity and sustainability. The study, conducted by Cranfield University's Sustainable Manufacturing Systems Centre, compared three different alloys (Aluminium-A380, Magnesium-AZ91D and Zinc-ZA8). Over recent years aluminum alloys have been favoured by the automotive manufacturing industry for their lightweight properties and lower cost. (2020-06-08)

Subcellular chatter regulates longevity
As people get older, they often feel less energetic, mobile or active. This may be due in part to a decline in mitochondria, the tiny powerhouses inside of our cells, which provide energy and regulate metabolism. In fact, mitochondria decline with age not only in humans, but in many species. Why they do so is not well understood. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Biology of Ageing in Cologne set out to understand how mitochondrial function is diminished with age and to find factors that prevent this process. They found that communication between mitochondria and other parts of the cell plays a key role. (2020-05-19)

Vitamin B3 revitalizes energy metabolism in muscle disease
An international team of scientists, led by University of Helsinki reported that vitamin B3, niacin, has therapeutic effect in progressive muscle disease. Niacin delayed disease progression in patients with mitochondrial myopathy, a progressive disease with no previous curative treatments. (2020-05-14)

Worms freeload on bacterial defence systems
Scientists have untangled a sensory circuit in worms that allows them to choose whether to spend energy on self-defence or rely on the help of nearby bacteria, a new study in eLife reveals. (2020-05-05)

Characterizing two sisters, examples of exceptional longevity
A new study provides a detailed characterization of two sisters -- one a supercentenarian and one a semi-supercentenarian -- aimed at providing new insights into what allowed them to live such long lives. (2020-05-01)

Conservation research on lynx
Scientists at the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) and the Leibniz Institute for Molecular Pharmacology (Leibniz-FMP) discovered that selected anti-oxidative enzymes, especially the enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD2), may play an important role to maintain the unusual longevity of the corpus luteum in lynxes. It is highly likely that SOD2 not only detoxifies the reactive oxygen radicals in the cells, but also inhibits programmed cell death. (2020-04-23)

How old are whale sharks? Nuclear bomb legacy reveals their age
Nuclear bomb tests during the Cold War in the 1950s and 1960s have helped scientists accurately estimate the age of whale sharks, the biggest fish in the seas, according to a Rutgers-led study. It's the first time the age of this majestic species has been verified. One whale shark was an estimated 50 years old when it died, making it the oldest known of its kind. Another shark was an estimated 35 years old. (2020-04-06)

Scientist proposes clinical trials with low-dose rapamycin to protect elderly from COVID-19
The Biogerontology Research Foundation, a registered UK charity supporting and promoting aging and longevity research worldwide since 2008, today announced the publication of a paper titled 'Geroprotective and senoremediative strategies to reduce the comorbidity, infection rates, severity, and lethality in gerophilic and gerolavic infections' in the leading journal Aging. (2020-04-06)

Female lifespan is longer in wild mammal animals than in humans
Longer lives are not only for female humans: Mammalian female's average lifespan is 18.6% longer than that of males. In humans the female advantage is on average 7.8%. (2020-03-25)

Sensing internal organ temperature with shining lights
A cheap, biocompatible white powder that luminesces when heated could be used for non-invasively monitoring the temperature of specific organs within the body. Tohoku University scientists conducted preliminary tests to demonstrate the applicability of this concept and published their findings in the journal Scientific Reports. (2020-03-23)

Glucose acts as a double edged sword on longevity factor SIRT1
Aberrant fasted-to-refed transitions associated with excess glucose production and perturbed insulin signaling in the liver, are known to cause diabetes/obesity/aging. New research from TIFR show glucose-dependent modification of the longevity factor SIRT1. This tuning is essential for gene expression and metabolic flexibility in normal fed-fast cycles and during aging. While there are efforts to find therapeutic activators for SIRT1, our study shows that both over-activation and under-activation of the longevity factor could lead to diseases. (2020-03-09)

Researchers identify novel anti-aging targets
A recent study published in Nature has reported two conserved epigenetic regulators as novel anti-aging targets. The research, by scientists from Dr. CAI Shiqing's Lab at the Center for Excellence in Brain Science and Intelligence Technology, Institute of Neuroscience of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), and Dr. JIANG Lubing's team at Institut Pasteur of Shanghai of CAS, identified conserved negative regulators of healthy aging by using multiple modalities and systems, thus providing insights into how to achieve healthy aging. (2020-02-26)

Insulin signaling suppressed by decoys
The discovery of an insulin 'decoy' molecule from the lab of Matthew Gill, PhD, in Florida shakes up understanding of insulin signaling, with implications for diabetes, longevity and aging research. (2020-02-25)

In killifish: Diapause protects life from normal consequences of aging
Studying the African turquoise killifish, which enters into a suspended state called 'diapause' during dry and unfavorable growing seasons, researchers uncovered mechanisms that allow the arrested fish to be maintained for long periods while being protected from the normal consequences of aging. (2020-02-20)

New device identifies high-quality blood donors
Blood banks have long known about high-quality donors - individuals whose red blood cells stay viable longer in storage and in the recipient's body. Now a new device developed at UBC is showing promise as a method to identify these donors, potentially helping more than 4.5 million patients who need blood transfusions every year in Canada and the United States. (2020-02-03)

Scientists have identified the role of chronic inflammation as the cause of accelerated aging
Claudio Franceschi, a world-renowned scientist, professor at the University of Bologna (Italy) and head of the Research Laboratory for Systems Medicine of Healthy Aging at Lobachevsky University, together with other members of an international research team, has described the mechanisms underlying chronic inflammation and identified several risk factors leading to disease. (2020-01-29)

Human longevity largest study of its kind shows early detection of disease & disease risks
Human Longevity, Inc. (HLI) announced the publication of a ground-breaking study in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). Study participants were evaluated with Human Longevity's multi-modal precision health platform, the Health Nucleus™. The assessment yielded highly actionable findings, most of which were not previously known, resulting in early identification of disease and disease risk in conditions that can lead to pre-mature mortality in adults. (2020-01-27)

Drinking 1% rather than 2% milk accounts for 4.5 years of less aging in adults
A new study shows drinking low-fat milk -- both nonfat and 1% milk -- is significantly associated with less aging in adults. Research on 5,834 US adults by Brigham Young University exercise science professor Larry Tucker, Ph.D., found people who drink low-fat (1% and skim) milk experience several years less biological aging than those who drink high-fat (2% and whole) milk. (2020-01-15)

Lonely in a crowd: Overcoming loneliness with acceptance and wisdom
Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine found the main characteristics of loneliness in a senior housing community and the strategies residents use to overcome it. (2020-01-10)

MDI biological scientists identify pathways that extend lifespan by 500%
Scientists at the MDI Biological Laboratory, in collaboration with scientists from the Buck Institute for Research on Aging in Novato, Calif., and Nanjing University in China, have identified synergistic cellular pathways for longevity that amplify lifespan fivefold in C. elegans, a nematode worm used as a model in aging research. The increase in lifespan would be the equivalent of a human living for 400 or 500 years, according to one of the scientists. (2020-01-08)

Corpus luteum cells of cats successfully cultivated and comprehensively characterized
The reproduction of lynxes is highly mysterious. Unlike other wild cats, most lynxes are only receptive for a few days once a year. The Berlin team has now achieved another breakthrough in solving the puzzle: they were able to isolate several cell types of corpus luteum from domestic cat tissue and characterise their function with the help of cell cultures. The new method can also be applied to endangered felids such as the Iberian lynx. (2019-12-20)

The secret to a long life? For worms, a cellular recycling protein is key
Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys have shown that worms live longer lives if they produce excess levels of a protein, p62, which recognizes toxic cell proteins that are tagged for destruction. The discovery, published in Nature Communications, could help uncover treatments for age-related conditions, such as Alzheimer's disease, which are often caused by accumulation of misfolded proteins. (2019-12-11)

Close friends help macaques survive
Close friendships improve the survival chances of rhesus macaques, new research shows. (2019-12-10)

The mechanism of programmed aging: The way to creation a real remedy for senescence
The mechanism of programed aging points the way to achieving unlimited healthy life: it is necessary to develop a means for managing bioenergetics. More concrete, we have to modify mitochondrial mechanism that controls the [ATP]/[ADP] level. It has already been substantially studied by molecular biologists and is now waiting for researchers from gerontology. (2019-11-25)

Smoker-survivor genes may have long ancestral history of fighting toxins
Longevity genes that helped humans survive ancient airborne toxins may be the same genes that make humans resilient to pollution from fossil fuels and cigarette smoke today, according to a study published in the December 2019 issue of The Quarterly Review of Biology. (2019-11-25)

Bacteria in the gut may alter ageing process, finds NTU Singapore study
An international research team led by Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) has found that microorganisms living in the gut may alter the ageing process, which could lead to the development of food-based treatment to slow it down. (2019-11-14)

Aging experts advocate global effort to ensure health spans match life spans
Across the world, more people are living longer. But 'whether the extra years will be good ones -- and whether societies and economies will benefit as a result -- depends on the actions we take now,' states an editorial in a new supplemental issue of The Journals of Gerontology, Series A: Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences from The Gerontological Society of America. (2019-11-13)

Study: Rapamycin prevents age-related brain vascular deterioration
A newly released study found that rats of advanced age, treated with the drug rapamycin, maintained superior blood flow to the brain compared to younger, untreated rats. The treated rats also exhibited improved memory. (2019-11-06)

Researchers describe how Vitamin E works in plants under extreme conditions
Vitamin E is a strong antioxidant that could act as a sentinel in plants, sending molecular signs from chloroplast -- a cell organ -- to the nucleus under extreme environmental conditions. This is stated in an article published in the journal Trends in Plant Science by the experts Sergi Munné-Bosch and Paula Muñoz, from the Faculty of Biology of the University of Barcelona (UB). (2019-10-30)

Emory researchers find college football players' weight gain leads to heart problems
Weight gain and high blood pressure in college football players leads to adverse changes in cardiac structure and function, indicating monitoring and early intervention is needed for this young and otherwise healthy athletic population, according to a new study by Emory University researchers. (2019-10-23)

Exploring the effect of fasting on age-related diseases
There are many indications that fasting promotes longevity. In recent years, much attention has been devoted to so-called caloric restriction mimetics (CMRs), substances that simulate the health-promoting effects of fasting without the need of life-style change. A study published in EMBO Molecular Medicine reports the identification of a novel candidate CRM. The substance may prove useful in the further research for the treatment of age-related diseases. (2019-10-21)

CNIO researchers obtain the first mice born with hyper-long telomeres
Mice with hyper-long telomeres live, on average, 13% longer and in better health, free from cancer and obesity The study has found for the first time ever a clear relationship between the length of telomeres and insulin and glucose metabolism, which are also crucial in ageing 'This finding opens the interesting hypothesis that genes are not the only thing to consider when it comes to determine species longevity,' indicates Maria Blasco, senior author of the paper. (2019-10-17)

Daily exposure to blue light may accelerate aging, even if it doesn't reach your eyes
Prolonged exposure to blue light, such as that which emanates from your phone, computer and household fixtures, could be affecting your longevity, even if it's not shining in your eyes. (2019-10-17)

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