Current Lottery Tickets News and Events

Current Lottery Tickets News and Events, Lottery Tickets News Articles.
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Where and when is economic decision-making represented in the brain?
Researchers at the University of Tsukuba report two areas of the monkey brain that represent expected value when making economic decisions. Analyses showed that neuronal activity in the VS and the cOFC provided stable representations of expected value, while other regions that are part of the reward network in the brain did not. State-space analysis revealed that the way expected value was represented over time differed in these two areas. (2021-02-10)

Vermont's BIPOC drivers are most likely to have a run-in with police, study shows
Examining more than 800,000 police stops in Vermont between 2014 to 2019, researchers confirm that Vermont authorities stop, ticket, arrest and search Black drivers at a rate far beyond their share of the state's total driving population. (2021-01-18)

Study finds gamblers ignore important information when placing bet
People with gambling problems are less likely to consider important information that could prevent them from losing, according to new research published today from the UBC's Centre for Gambling Research. (2020-12-03)

Shrinking massive neural networks used to model language
Deep learning neural networks can be massive, demanding major computing power. In a test of the ''lottery ticket hypothesis,'' MIT researchers have found leaner, more efficient subnetworks hidden within BERT models. The discovery could make natural language processing more accessible. (2020-12-01)

Forgetting past misdeeds to justify future ones
Proven fact: we remember our altruistic behaviour more easily than selfish actions or misdeeds that go against our own moral sense. Described as 'unethical amnesia' by scientists, it is generally explained by self-image maintenance. But could these selective oversights, not necessarily conscious, have a more strategic aim? To find out, a team of behavioural economists from the CNRS recruited 1322 volunteers in an online experiment which took place over two sessions. (2020-09-29)

Covert tobacco industry marketing tactics exposed by former employees
Tobacco companies use covert marketing tactics and exploit loopholes in Australian tobacco control laws to promote their products despite current tobacco advertising bans, finds new research from University of Sydney and Cancer Council NSW. To circumvent current tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship (TAPS) laws in Australia, tobacco companies are incentivising retailers with cash payments, all-expenses paid holidays, exclusive parties and tickets to sporting events to drive tobacco sales. (2020-09-28)

The hormone glucagon may be a warning light for diabetes
Researchers from the University of Copenhagen are introducing a new biological concept in the fight against diabetes: glucagon resistance. Glucagon resistance or decreased sensitivity to the hormone glucagon increases the risk of type 2 diabetes. New research shows that glucagon resistance is particularly pronounced in people with fatty liver, and this may be the key to understanding the link between fatty liver and diabetes. (2020-09-17)

Bus drivers more likely to let white customers ride for free
A new paper in The Economic Journal finds that bus drivers are more likely to let white riders ride for free and less likely to let Black riders ride without paying the fee. (2020-09-02)

Lottery for ventilators
In times of acute shortages, the orthodoxy in healthcare is for scarce resources to be allocated based on who has the best chance of survival. However, Dr Diego Silva, from the University of Sydney, argues this simple utility calculus is unjust because it exacerbates existing social inequities. In a paper published in Chest Journal, Dr Silva proposes a radical departure from current convention by arguing ventilators should be allocated to COVID-19 patients via a lottery. (2020-08-05)

Design flaws in Universal Credit for couples revealed as claims soar
As the numbers of new claims for Universal Credit reach three million, in the context of COVID-19, a new report reveals the complex issues couples experience with this new benefit. (2020-06-22)

Decide now or wait for something better?
When we make decisions, we don't always have all options available to choose from at the same time. Instead they often come one after another, as for example when we search for an apartment or a flight ticket. So we have to decide on something without knowing if a better option might have come along later. A study at the University of Zurich has shown that our standards drop more and more in the course of decision-making. (2020-06-18)

Early Bird uses 10 times less energy to train deep neural networks
Rice engineers have found a way to train deep neural networks for a fraction of the energy required today. Their Early Bird method finds key network connectivity patterns early in training, reducing the computations and carbon footprint for training deep learning. (2020-05-18)

Experts call for health and climate change warning labels on petrol pumps
Warning labels should be displayed on petrol pumps, energy bills, and airline tickets to encourage consumers to question their own use of fossil fuels, say health experts in The BMJ today. (2020-03-30)

How does an intersex bee behave?
A group of scientists and students working at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute's Barro Colorado Island studied the circadian rhythm of a bee gynandromorph: a rare condition that results in the expression of both male and female characteristics. (2020-03-18)

Tracking down false parkers in cancer cells
In squamous cell carcinoma, a protein ensures that unneeded proteins are no longer disposed of. A research team at the University of W├╝rzburg has switched off this protein for the first time. (2020-03-10)

Study urges national review of support services for male survivors of sexual violence
A call for a complete review of national support services for male survivors of sexual violence and abuse has been made following a study by Lancaster University, launched today. The comments are made in a 40-page study carried out by Lancaster University for the Male Survivors Partnership. (2020-01-27)

Resale ticket markets benefit sports teams and fans
New research co-authored by Yanwen Wang, an assistant professor in the UBC Sauder School of Business, reveals that the resale ticket market also appeals to sports fans who normally buy season tickets. (2020-01-14)

New health insurance insights
MIT economists analyze how patients and health care providers value Medicaid. (2019-12-16)

Lack of psychological support for those dealing with infertility in the UK
Psychological support for those dealing with infertility and its treatment is received by only just half of those who want it in the UK - with many left to suffer with anxiety, depression, or suicidal thoughts, according to a new study published in Human Fertility. (2019-12-06)

Love, lies and money: Study introduces, defines and measures financial infidelity
New research from the University of Notre Dame introduces the concept of financial infidelity -- engaging in any financial behavior likely to be frowned upon by a romantic partner and intentionally failing to disclose that behavior. (2019-12-03)

Physiotherapy 'postcode lottery' uncovered
New research finds that the amount of physiotherapy available following hip and knee replacements comes down to a 'postcode lottery.' Those living in London and the North of England are more likely to receive physiotherapy, patients in the South West are the least likely to receive physiotherapy. The research also reveals other factors impacting whether patients receive physiotherapy -- including how old the patient is (younger patients more likely to), gender (females more likely to) and ethnicity (non-whites more likely to). (2019-11-27)

UBC study finds siblings of problem gamblers also impulsive, prone to risk-taking
Biological siblings of people with gambling disorder also display markers of increased impulsivity and risk-taking, according to a new UBC psychology study. The findings, published today in Neuropsychopharmacology, suggest people with gambling disorder -- a psychiatric term for serious gambling problems -- may have pre-existing genetic vulnerabilities to the illness. (2019-10-09)

Promotional games at retail stores increase consumer spending
Surprisingly, even when the discount won from a promotional game is smaller than a traditional discount -- say only 10% versus 20% -- researchers still saw the same phenomenon. (2019-10-03)

How to make carbon pricing palatable to air travellers
Travellers are willing to pay a little more for flights if they know the extra money will be used to address carbon emissions, a new study from the UBC Sauder School of Business has found. (2019-10-03)

The rise of deal collectives that punish profits
Deal collectives can be a liability for companies, especially when deal collectives regularly execute deals that result in pricing below cost. (2019-10-01)

The ever-winning lottery ticket: Mathematicians solve a dusty mystery
After years of work, University of Copenhagen mathematics researchers have answered a mysterious half-century-old riddle. The mystery was all but forgotten until a Danish researcher heard about, and then decided to tackle it. (2019-09-09)

How we make decisions depends on how uncertain we are
A new Dartmouth study on how we use reward information for making choices shows how humans and monkeys adopt their decision-making strategies depending on the uncertainty of information present. The findings published in Nature Human Behavior challenge one of the most fundamental assumptions in economics, neuroeconomics and choice theory that decision-makers typically evaluate risky options in a multiplicative way when in fact this only applies in a limited case when information about both the magnitude and probability of the reward are known. (2019-09-09)

Bad to the bone or just bad behavior?
A new study out of Columbia University suggests that the way we perceive others' bad behavior -- as either biological and innate or potentially changeable -- impacts our willingness to cut them some slack. (2019-09-06)

#BeatEngland, beat sunburn
UV detection stickers trialled by Queensland University of Technology (QUT) researchers at the November 2017 Ashes Test at the Gabba in Brisbane, Australia, prompted 80% of cricket goers who used the stickers to reapply protective sunscreen. However, some in this group still reported receiving a mild or moderate sunburn at the game, indicating they may not have properly applied and reapplied sunscreen or not used enough to provide full protection. (2019-07-12)

Restricted permit-only access to Yosemite National Park's Half Dome summit, anticipated to improve hiker safety, did not
According to a new study in Wilderness & Environmental Medicine, implementation in 2010 of permit-only access to Yosemite National Park's Half Dome cable handrails along the final ascent of this iconic landmark reduced the number of people on the summit at one time, but this did not result in a significant reduction in the overall toll of associated human suffering and mortality, or search and rescue (SAR) activity and costs. (2019-06-26)

New poll shows how little we know about dying
New data released today shows that six in 10 people answering feel they know, at most, 'just a little' about what happens to a person in their final hours of life. This is despite one in two people who were asked saying they have been present with someone at the end of life. (2019-05-08)

Study finds differences in storefront tobacco advertising by product type
In response to US restrictions on where tobacco companies are allowed to advertise their products, the industry now dedicates nearly all of its $9 billion advertising budget to activities occurring in retail settings. A new study by researchers at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health fills an important gap by documenting specific characteristics of storefront tobacco advertisements in the context of today's diverse tobacco product landscape. (2019-04-24)

Researchers outline how humans reduce uncertainty in social situations
A new perspective paper from Brown University scientists establishes a framework to apply rigorous mathematical models of uncertainty originally developed for non-social situations, such as whether or not to purchase a lottery ticket, to social scenarios such as determining an interviewer's opinion of an interviewee. (2019-04-22)

Disappearing bumblebee species under threat of extinction
The American Bumblebee - a species once more commonly seen buzzing around Southern Ontario - is critically endangered, according to a new study led by York University. The finding, published in Journal of Insect Conservation, found the native North American species, Bombus pensylvanicus, is facing imminent extinction from Canada, considered the highest and most at-risk classification before extinction. (2019-04-18)

Auction bids decline with intensity of competition: new research
People bid less in auctions that have more bidders, new research suggests. (2019-04-15)

Mailing colorectal cancer screening kit found effective, regardless of financial incentive
Roughly a quarter of patients overdue for colorectal cancer screening mailed completed kits back within two months, even if they weren't given any kind of financial incentive. (2019-03-22)

Financial incentives didn't improve response rates to mailed colorectal cancer screening tests
Financial incentives didn't increase completion rates of colorectal cancer screening tests mailed to patients. In a randomized clinical trial of almost 900 patients, none of the incentives (an unconditional $10, a promised $10 upon completion of the fecal immunochemical test (FIT) kit to test for blood in a stool sample or chance at a lottery with a 1-in-10 chance of winning $100) was statistically better than no financial incentive to entice patients to complete the FIT. (2019-03-22)

Can people learn to embrace risk?
Studies have shown women are more risk-averse than men, a trait experts say could help to explain the persistent wage gap between men and women. New research suggests those gender differences are shaped by culture and the social environment and that those differences can shift, at least in children. (2019-03-18)

Faster robots demoralize co-workers
A Cornell University-led team has found that when robots are beating humans in contests for cash prizes, people consider themselves less competent and expend slightly less effort -- and they tend to dislike the robots. (2019-03-11)

Does awe lead to greater interest in science?
A new study finds that feeling awe leads to greater awareness of the things we don't know, which in turn makes us more likely to seek out a framework to fill those gaps. Science is one such framework. (2019-03-07)

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