Current Low Birth Weight News and Events

Current Low Birth Weight News and Events, Low Birth Weight News Articles.
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Nonsurgical treatment for cerebral infarction using wearable wireless ultrasound devices
Korea Institute of Science and Technology(KIST) announced that the research team at the Center for Bionics, led by Dr. Kim Hyungmin, developed a wireless rehabilitation treatment technology for brain nervous system damaged by a stroke by fabricating a wearable, wireless low-intensity focused ultrasound brain stimulator. Additionally, to verify its effectiveness, this brain stimulator was applied to animal models of stroke. (2021-01-19)

Ohio State-led support program suggests a reduction in preterm birth and infant mortality
New research suggests a unique program called Moms2B at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center shows a reduction in adverse pregnancy outcomes in communities disproportionately affected by these public health issues. (2021-01-19)

Clumsy kids can be fit too
Clumsy kids can be as aerobically fit as their peers with better motor skills, a new Finnish study shows. The results are based on research conducted at the Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences of the University of Jyväskylä and the Institute of Biomedicine of the University of Eastern Finland, and they were published in Translational Sports Medicine. (2021-01-19)

Obese, snoring mini pigs show how air flows through the throat during sleep apnea
A study appearing January 19 in the journal Heliyon found that obese Yucatan mini pigs have naturally occurring sleep apnea and that MRI scans taken while they're in sedated sleep can be used to gain new insights into what happens in the airways during sleep apnea episodes via computational flow dynamic (CFD) analysis. (2021-01-19)

NIH study compares low-fat, plant-based diet to low-carb, animal-based diet
People on a low-fat, plant-based diet ate fewer daily calories but had higher insulin and blood glucose levels, compared to when they ate a low-carbohydrate, animal-based diet, according to a small but highly controlled study at the National Institutes of Health. Led by researchers at the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), the study compared the effects of the two diets on calorie intake, hormone levels, body weight, and more. (2021-01-19)

Simple, cheap test can help save lives from colorectal cancer
New research has demonstrated that a simple, cheap test can help identify who is at risk of developing colorectal cancer, aiding early diagnosis and potentially saving lives. (2021-01-18)

Researchers identify nanoparticles that could deliver therapeutic mRNA before birth
Researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and the School of Engineering and Applied Science at the University of Pennsylvania have identified ionizable lipid nanoparticles that could be used to deliver mRNA as part of fetal therapy. The proof-of-concept study, published today in Science Advances, engineered and screened a number of lipid nanoparticle formulations for targeting mouse fetal organs and has laid the groundwork for testing potential therapies to treat genetic diseases before birth. (2021-01-13)

Nanotechnology prevents premature birth in mouse studies
In a study in mice and human cells, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say that they have developed a tiny, yet effective method for preventing premature birth. (2021-01-13)

Short term low carbohydrate diet linked to remission of type 2 diabetes
Patients with type 2 diabetes who follow a strict low carbohydrate diet for six months may experience greater rates of remission compared with other recommended diets without adverse effects, suggests a study published by The BMJ today. (2021-01-13)

Pillar-like molecules as biosensors for metabolites
Researchers at Kanazawa University report in Communications Chemistry that a molecule known as pillar[6]arene can form a host-guest compound with a cancer-associated metabolite. The phenomenon can be used to efficiently detect the metabolite in crude biological samples, which is important for preventing and treating metabolic syndrome and associated pathologies. (2021-01-11)

Megalodons gave birth to large newborns that likely grew by eating unhatched eggs in womb
A new study shows that the gigantic Megalodon or megatooth shark, which lived nearly worldwide roughly 15-3.6 million years ago and reached at least 50 feet (15 meters) in length, gave birth to babies larger than most adult humans. (2021-01-10)

Perceiving prosthesis as lighter thanks to neurofeedback
Transmitting sensory signals from prostheses to the nervous system helps leg amputees to perceive prosthesis as part of their body. While amputees generally perceive their prostheses as heavy, this feedback helps them to perceive the prostheses as significantly lighter, ETH researchers have shown. (2021-01-08)

Shriners Hospitals for Children study reveals new link to arthritis
A new study by investigators at the Shriners Hospital for Children -- St. Louis suggests the damaging effects of obesity are not due to body weight but rather come from something much smaller - biochemical signals released by fat cells. (2021-01-08)

Does a mother's pre-pregnancy weight affect her children's future fertility?
A recent study published in Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica found that sons born to mothers who fell within the overweight range were more likely to be diagnosed with infertility during adulthood than sons of mothers with normal-range weight. (2021-01-06)

In-utero exposures associated with increased risk of thyroid cancer
A recent study shows that thyroid cancer is related to in-utero exposures. (2021-01-05)

For moms, oxygen during childbirth often unnecessary
A comprehensive analysis - led by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis - has found no benefit in providing supplemental oxygen to mothers during labor and delivery, a decades-long and common practice. Infants born to women who received supplemental oxygen fared no better or no worse than those born to women who had similar labor experiences but breathed room air. (2021-01-04)

Survival of the thickest: Big brains make mammal populations less dense
Body size and diet are known to influence mammal abundance in different areas, but brain size had not been considered previously. This new study shows that larger brains correlate with lower population densities, likely because of the additional resources they require. (2020-12-23)

New drug combination could improve glucose and weight control in diabetes
Scientists have shown that adding an experimental cancer drug to a widely used diabetes treatment improves blood glucose control and weight loss in mice, according to a study published today in eLife. (2020-12-22)

Exposure to metals can impact pregnancy
Exposure to metals such as nickel, arsenic, cobalt and lead may disrupt a woman's hormones during pregnancy, according to a Rutgers study. (2020-12-21)

Study shows incorporating telemedicine helps surgical practices
A new study that records patient volume at Stony Brook Medicine's Bariatric and Metabolic Weight Loss Center reveals that follow-up telehealth visits are highly effective during the COVID-19 pandemic. The study, published in the December issue of the Annals of Surgery, serves as an example that surgical practices can continue to thrive with the help of telemedicine during the pandemic. (2020-12-18)

Zika virus affects eye development before but not after birth
A new study from UC Davis finds that Zika infection during the first trimester of pregnancy can impact fetal retinal development and cause congenital ocular anomalies. The virus does not appear to affect ocular growth postnatally. (2020-12-18)

Low-income preschoolers exposed to nurturing care have with higher IQ scores later on
Preschoolers living in impoverished communities who have access to a nurturing home environment have significantly higher intelligence quotient (IQ) scores in adolescence compared to those raised without nurturing care. (2020-12-18)

Talking to kids about weight: What the internet says and why researchers are wary
Researchers from the Center for Weight, Eating and Lifestyle Science (WELL Center) in the College of Arts and Sciences at Drexel University systematically reviewed numerous independently published guidelines for having conversations with children about weight status to analyze their content, consistency, actionability and scientific support. They recommend future guidelines unify their messages and be better supported by scholarly data. (2020-12-17)

Patients don't receive recommended follow-up care after weight loss surgery
New research shows that patients don't receive the recommended follow-up care from their GPs after weight loss surgery - potentially leading to serious health consequences. (2020-12-16)

Singing to preterm infants during kangaroo care reduces maternal anxiety
Premature births are stressful experiences that increase the risk of anxiety for mothers and may hinder the development of interaction between mother and infant. A new study indicates that the combination of singing and kangaroo care boosts the wellbeing of the mothers of preterm infants, also making it easier for them to establish a connection with their baby. (2020-12-14)

Does sharing health data help maintain weight loss?
Research from the Center for Weight, Eating and Lifestyle Science (WELL Center) in the College of Arts and Sciences at Drexel University suggests that health counselors having access to self-monitored health data would improve a person's weight loss maintenance. (2020-12-14)

Masonic Medical Research Institute studies brown fat: Implications in obesity
The Lin Lab at the MMRI, quantified the number of brown fat cells present in newborn animals. For years, researchers have argued over whether brown fat continues to grow after birth. Dr. Lin and his team have become the first to prove that it does. (2020-12-11)

Kids gain weight when new convenience stores open nearby
A new study in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, published by Elsevier, found that changes in the food environment around low-income and high-ethnic/racial minority populations over time impact childhood obesity. Increased availability of small grocery stores selling a selection of healthy items in close proximity to children's homes improves their weight status over time, whereas increased availability of convenience stores selling predominantly unhealthy foods is likely to be detrimental. (2020-12-10)

Exercise may protect bone health after weight loss surgery
Although weight loss surgery is a highly effective treatment for obesity, it can be detrimental to bone health. A new study published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research suggests that exercise may help address this shortcoming. (2020-12-09)

Breast cancer survivors are less likely to get pregnant, but often have healthy babies and good long-term health
A large meta-analysis of breast cancer survivors of childbearing age indicated that they are less likely than the general public to get pregnant, and they face higher risk of certain complications such as preterm labor. However, most survivors who do get pregnant deliver healthy babies and have no adverse effects on their long-term survival, according to data presented at the 2020 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium. (2020-12-09)

Listen to the birds: illegal diet pill DNP might kill you on the long run
DNP, a weight loss agent withdrawn from the market in the late 1930s due to acute toxicity, has become increasingly popular in recent years through online illegal sales. A new study using a lifelong DNP treatment in an avian model found that while no obvious toxic effects were detected on the short to medium-term, DNP reduces lifespan by 20% on the long run. (2020-12-09)

Infant health inequality has increased since 2010, study finds
After decades of narrowing gaps in health between infants born to the most and least advantaged American mothers, infant health inequality is increasing, portending a rise in health and social inequity that could last for decades. (2020-12-08)

More support for induction at 41 weeks' pregnancy, especially for first time mothers
There is growing evidence that pregnant women who go beyond term, especially first time mothers and their infants, will benefit from induction of labour at 41 weeks, instead of expectant management with subsequent induction of labour at 42 weeks if labour will not start spontaneously. This is clearer now that researchers from Sweden and the Netherlands have appraised results from three previous investigations. (2020-12-08)

Study finds no change in preterm birth or stillbirth in Philadelphia during pandemic
Despite early reports suggesting a decline in preterm births during the COVID-19 pandemic period, an analysis by researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania has found no change in preterm births or stillbirths at two Philadelphia hospitals in the first four months of the pandemic. The findings, published today in JAMA, resulted from the examination of an ongoing, racially-diverse pregnancy cohort that assesses both spontaneous and medically-indicated preterm birth. (2020-12-07)

Baby's first breath triggers life-saving changes in the brain
A new discovery reveals how something amazing happens when a baby takes a first breath. The finding could shed light on sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). (2020-12-04)

New study debunks blood type diet
A study published in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics by researchers with the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine -- a nonprofit of 12,000 doctors -- debunks the 'blood type diet' by finding that blood type was not associated with the effects of a plant-based diet on body weight, body fat, plasma lipid concentrations, or glycemic control. (2020-12-04)

Gastric bypass surgery leads to long-term diabetes remission
More than half of adults with obesity had long-term diabetes remission following gastric bypass surgery, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. (2020-12-03)

Anorexia patients tolerate rapid weight gain with meal-based behavioral support
A new study by Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers of adults hospitalized for the eating disorder anorexia nervosa has strengthened the case for promoting rapid weight gain as part of overall efforts. (2020-12-03)

Role of birth order on career choice might have been overestimated in previous research
In a new study that could turn what we know about birth order upside down, a University of Houston researcher has found that the role of birth order on career types, occupational creativity and status attainment might have been overestimated in previous research. (2020-12-03)

Drinking linked to a decline in brain health from cradle to grave
The evidence for the harmful effects of alcohol on brain health is compelling, but now experts have pin-pointed three key time periods in life when the effects of alcohol are likely to be at their greatest. (2020-12-03)

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