Current Low Pressure Area News and Events

Current Low Pressure Area News and Events, Low Pressure Area News Articles.
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New blood pressure-lowering guidelines could benefit 25 million americans with chronic kidney disease
A recommendation for more intensive blood pressure management from an influential global nonprofit that publishes clinical practice guidelines in kidney disease could, if followed, benefit nearly 25 million Americans. (2021-02-23)

New study on the forecasting of extreme rainfall events in Mediterranean countries
A new study identifies nine specific large-scale weather patterns that influence extreme precipitation over the Mediterranean. Making use of this connection between localized extremes and large-scale weather variability can help to better predict heavy rainfall up to three weeks ahead. Researchers at the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF, UK) and TU Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany) presented their results in the current issue of the International Journal of Climatology. (2021-02-22)

New crystalline ice form
Three years ago, chemists at the University of Innsbruck found evidence for the existence of a new variety of ice. Until then, 18 types of crystalline ice were known. The team led by Thomas Loerting now reports in Nature Communications on the elucidation of the crystal structure of ice XIX using neutron diffraction. (2021-02-18)

Transit-oriented development causing displacement: study
Transit-oriented development--which concentrates high-density housing, commercial activities and public spaces around a rapid transit station--can both be a boon and a bane for communities, suggests a new UBC study. (2021-02-18)

South American lizard's blood pressure mechanism is more efficient at cool temperatures
The black and white tegu lizard, which depends on external environmental factors to regulate body temperature, can survive swings between 15 and 35 degrees Celsius in a single day while keeping blood pressure steady. (2021-02-18)

New method converts methane in natural gas to methanol at room temperature
Researchers at the University of Illinois Chicago have discovered a way to convert the methane in natural gas into liquid methanol at room temperature. (2021-02-18)

Biotech fit for the Red Planet
Astrobiologists from the University of Bremen show for the first time that a N2/CO2-rich low-pressure atmosphere, water, and nutrients from Mars-like dust are sufficient for Cyanobacterium-Based Life-Support Systems, making it easier for future astronauts to produce food and other resources. (2021-02-16)

Low-value health care drops only marginally despite effort to curb practices
An estimated 10% to 20% of health care spending consists of low-value care -- patient services that offer no net clinical benefit in specific scenarios. A new study finds that spending on low-value health care among fee-for-service Medicare recipients dropped only marginally from 2014 to 2018, despite both a national campaign to better educate clinicians and increasing use of payment revisions that discourage wasteful care. (2021-02-16)

Challenge of the summer rainfall forecast skill in China: A possible solution
The Mongolian Cyclone is a major meteorological driving force across southeast Asia. This cyclone is known for transporting aerosols, affecting where precipitation develops. Meteorologists are seeking ways to improve seasonal prediction of the relationship between the Mongolian cyclone and South Asia high. These features are major components of the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) and the corresponding heavy rain events. New research suggests that analyzing these phenomena in the upper-level atmosphere will enhance the summer rainfall forecast skill in China. (2021-02-16)

New skin patch brings us closer to wearable, all-in-one health monitor
Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a soft, stretchy skin patch that can be worn on the neck to continuously track blood pressure and heart rate while measuring the wearer's levels of glucose as well as lactate, alcohol or caffeine. It is the first wearable device that monitors cardiovascular signals and multiple biochemical levels in the human body at the same time. (2021-02-15)

In predicting shallow but dangerous landslides, size matters
Scientific understanding of landslides has improved immensely in the last few decades, but models that predict which areas could slide during specific storm events overpredict, forcing government agencies to evacuate unnecessarily large areas. UC Berkeley geoscientists have created improved models that more narrowly pinpoint the most hazardous areas, but they've run up against a wall: they need data about what lies between the soil surface and bedrock, something current techniques like LiDAR cannot adequately provide. (2021-02-15)

Women have a lower range of 'normal' blood pressure than men
A new study from the Smidt Heart Institute at Cedars-Sinai shows that women have a lower ''normal'' blood pressure range compared to men. The findings were published today in the peer-reviewed journal Circulation. (2021-02-15)

Protected areas see continued deforestation but at a reduced rate, OSU research shows
A survey of more than 18,000 land parcels spanning 2 million square miles across 63 countries shows that a ''protected area'' designation reduces the rate of deforestation but does not prevent it. (2021-02-11)

Low-income middle-aged African-American women with hypertension are likely to suffer from depression
Low-income middle-aged African-American women with high blood pressure very commonly suffer from depression and should be better screened for this serious mental health condition. (2021-02-11)

Prediabetes may be linked to worse brain health
For the study, published in the journal Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism, researchers analysed data from the UK Biobank of 500,000 people aged 58 years on average, and found that people with higher than normal blood sugar levels were 42% more likely to experience cognitive decline over an average of four years, and were 54% more likely to develop vascular dementia over an average of eight years (although absolute rates of both cognitive decline and dementia were low). (2021-02-11)

Stable armchairlike hexazine N6 ring in tungsten hexanitride
We have successfully synthesized WN6 at 126-165 GPa after laser heating up to ?3500 K. The WN6 phase contains novel armchairlike N6 rings. Future efforts in the synthesis and recovery of TMNs will lead to a wealth of knowledge in the novel chemistry and physical properties of the single-bonded hexazine-bearing nitrides. (2021-02-10)

Cannabis reduces blood pressure in older adults, according to Ben-Gurion University researchers
''Older adults are the fastest growing group of medical cannabis users, yet evidence on cardiovascular safety for this population is scarce,'' says Dr. Ran Abuhasira of the BGU Faculty of Health Sciences, one of Israel's leading medical faculties, and the BGU-Soroka Cannabis Clinical Research Institute. ''This study is part of our ongoing effort to provide clinical research on the actual physiological effects of cannabis over time.'' (2021-02-08)

Higher blood pressure at night than in daytime may increase Alzheimer's disease risk
Higher blood pressure at night than in daytime may be a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease in older men. This is suggested by a new study from researchers at Uppsala University, now published in the journal Hypertension. (2021-02-08)

'Magnetic graphene' forms a new kind of magnetism
Researchers have identified a new form of magnetism in so-called magnetic graphene, which could point the way toward understanding superconductivity in this unusual type of material. (2021-02-08)

Large-area periodic perovskite nanostructures for lenticular printing laser displays
We fabricated large-area periodic structures with spatial resolution at wavelength scale from hybrid perovskite materials via a space-confined solution growth method. It takes advantages of both high refractive index contrast and high luminescence brightness, which allows the optical modulation on not only the reflection of illumination, but also the light emission from hybrid perovskites. The distributed feedback within these periodic structures significantly improves the degree of polarization and directionality of laser action while its threshold is also reduced. (2021-02-04)

Textile sensor patch could detect pressure points for amputees
A soft, flexible sensor system created with electrically conductive yarns could help map problematic pressure points in the socket of an amputee's prosthetic limb, researchers from North Carolina State University report in a new study. (2021-02-02)

More than meets the eye (of the storm): Typhoons in Korea amplified wildfires in America
In August 2020, the Korean peninsula was hit by 3 devastating typhoons. A recent study by a team of scientists from Korea and the U.S. reveals that these typhoons played a role in the wildfires in Oregon, thousands of miles away. The extreme changes in weather patterns caused by these typhoons reiterate that the consequences of natural disasters are far-reaching and not always limited to the origin. (2021-02-01)

Women who develop high blood pressure after birth at greater risk of chronic hypertension
In a new study to be presented today at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's (SMFM) annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting™, researchers from the University of Pittsburgh will unveil findings that suggest that women who develop high blood pressure during pregnancy and who continue to have elevated blood pressure postpartum are at an increased risk for developing chronic hypertension. (2021-01-29)

New treatment helps patients with a spinal cord injury
Spinal cord injuries disrupt the mechanism by which our bodies regulate blood pressure. A team of Swiss and Canadian scientists have developed a treatment that allows patients to regain control of their blood pressure, using targeted electrical spinal-cord stimulation. No medication is required. The team's findings were published today in Nature. (2021-01-28)

Chinese spice helps unravel the mysteries of human touch
New insight into how human brains detect and perceive different types of touch, such as fluttery vibrations and steady pressures, has been revealed by UCL scientists with the help of the ancient Chinese cooking ingredient, Szechuan pepper. (2021-01-28)

'Be a man': Why some men respond aggressively to threats to manhood
When their manhood is threatened, some men respond more aggressively than others. New research from Duke University suggests who may be most triggered by such threats - younger men whose sense of masculinity depends heavily on other people's opinions. ''The more social pressure a man feels to be masculine, the more aggressive he may be,'' said Adam Stanaland, a Ph.D. candidate in psychology and public policy at Duke and the study's lead author. (2021-01-28)

Research finds blood pressure can be controlled without drugs after spinal cord injury
Canadian and Swiss researchers have created the first platform to understand the mechanisms underlying blood pressure instability after spinal cord injury. The discovery has led to a new cutting-edge solution. Spinal cord stimulators can bridge the body's autonomous regulation system, controlling blood pressure without medication. Findings are published in Nature. (2021-01-27)

First direct band gap measurements of wide-gap hydrogen using inelastic X-ray scattering
Utilizing a newly developed state-of-the-art synchrotron technique, a group of scientists led by Dr. Ho-kwang Mao, Director of HPSTAR, conducted the first-ever high-pressure study of the electronic band and gap information of solid hydrogen up to 90 GPa. (2021-01-26)

Genetic breakthrough to target care for deadly heart condition
New genetic faults discovered in people with a heart condition that is sometimes inherited in families could transform the diagnosis and treatment of the hidden disease, according to research funded by the British Heart Foundation (BHF) and published in Nature Genetics. (2021-01-25)

Targeted coating improves graphene oxide membranes for nanofiltration
A research group led by Prof. WAN Yinhua from the Institute of Process Engineering (IPE) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences developed a stable graphene oxide nanofiltration membrane with uniform pore size to remove organic micropollutants. (2021-01-22)

Wet and wild: There's lots of water in the world's most explosive volcano
Conditions inside the Shiveluch volcano include roughly 10%-14% water by weight (wt%), according to research from Washington University in St. Louis. Most volcanoes have less than 1% water. For subduction zone volcanoes, the average is usually 4%, rarely exceeding 8 wt%, which is considered superhydrous. (2021-01-22)

Risk factors for intraoperative pressure injury in aortic surgery
In a new publication from Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications; DOI https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2019.1263, Yao Dong, Jun-E Liu and Ling Song from the Capital Medical University, Beijing, China consider risk factors for intraoperative pressure injury in aortic surgery. (2021-01-22)

Predictive value of blood pressure, heart rate, and blood pressure/heart rate ratio in a Chinese subpopulation with vasovagal syncope
In a new publication from Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications; DOI https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2019.1266, Zhuzhi Wen, Jingying Hou, Zun Mai, Huifen Huang, Yangxin Chen, Dengfeng Geng and Jingfeng Wang from Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China and Guandong Province Key Laboratory of Arrhythmia and Electrophysiology, Guangzhou, China consider predictive value of blood pressure, heart rate, and blood pressure/heart rate ratio in a Chinese subpopulation with vasovagal syncope. (2021-01-22)

Taking sieving lessons from nature
Nanostructure-templated electrochemical polymerization enhances speed and selectivity in organic membrane-based processes. (2021-01-21)

Burial practices point to an interconnected early Medieval Europe
Changes in Western European burial practices spread rapidly during the 6th - 8th centuries AD, providing strong evidence that early Medieval Europe was a well-connected place with a shared culture. (2021-01-21)

Squeezing a rock-star material could make it stable enough for solar cells
A promising lead halide perovskite is great at converting sunlight to electricity, but it breaks down at room temperature. Now scientists have discovered how to stabilize it with pressure from a diamond anvil cell. The required pressure is well within the reach of industrial manufacturing requirements. (2021-01-21)

Many junior doctors feel out of their depth with the end-of-life decisions faced during COVID-19 pandemic
In normal times, end-of-life care discussions are most commonly led by senior doctors. However, new research from a busy London hospital shows that the high numbers of deaths taking place in hospitals during the COVID-19 pandemic, frequently out-of-hours, is leading to junior (foundation level) doctors having to lead on these difficult discussions with families, often with no formal experience or training. (2021-01-20)

Testing the waters: Analyzing different solid states of water on other planets and moons
Aside from regular ice, water can exist in the form of peculiar solids called clathrate hydrates, which trap small gaseous molecules. They play a large role in the evolution of atmospheres, but predicting their presence in cryogenic temperatures is difficult. In a recent study, scientists from Okayama University developed statistical mechanics theory to determine their presence in Pluto and some of Jupiter's and Saturn's satellites, providing valuable information to revise existing interpretations. (2021-01-19)

Semiconductor chip that detects exhaled gas with high sensitivity at room temperature
The research team at Toyohashi University of Technology developed a testing chip using semiconductor micro-machining that can detect volatile gasses in exhaled breath in ppm concentrations at room temperature. The testing chip, which is formed in the size of a few square millimeters with semiconductor micro-machining technology, is expected to contribute to telehealth as an IoT gas sensor that can easily be used in the home for breath tests. (2021-01-19)

General health checkups may detect early signs of Parkinson's disease
A research team led by Nagoya University in Japan has found that blood pressure, the hematocrit, and serum cholesterol levels change in patients with Parkinson's disease long before the onset of motor symptoms. This finding may pave the way for early diagnosis and treatment of the disease. (2021-01-19)

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