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Current Low Birth Weight News and Events, Low Birth Weight News Articles.
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Obesity not a risk factor for acute respiratory illnesses, study finds
Although obesity has been considered a risk factor for more-severe cases of the flu, a new study found that it is not a risk factor for severe acute respiratory illnesses, including the flu, in children or adults. (2018-02-28)
Only 25 percent of women receive appropriate advice on pregnancy weight gain
A new study of the role of healthcare provider recommendations on weight gain during pregnancy showed that while provider advice did influence gestational weight gain, only about one in four women received appropriate advice and another 25 percent received no advice. (2018-02-27)
Obesity could be linked to early childhood behavior
Health authorities will need to focus on more than eating habits if they are going to combat the obesity epidemic. (2018-02-27)
Ohio State study reveals no link between hormonal birth control and depression
The vast majority of women will use some method of contraception during their lifetime. (2018-02-26)
Preterm birth leaves its mark in the functional networks of the brain
Researchers at the University of Helsinki and the Helsinki University Hospital, Finland, have proven that premature birth has a significant and, at the same time, a very selective effect on the functional networks of a child's brain. (2018-02-26)
Children's learning is not affected by repeated sick days with fever and infections
Whereas severe infections with long-term hospitalisations can make it more difficult for a child to pass the 9th grade exam, recurring less serious severe infections do not affect children's learning. (2018-02-23)
The good and bad health news about your exercise posts on social media
The more you see your friends post about exercise on social media, the worse you might feel about your own weight, especially when you perceive those people as being very similar to you, new research suggests. (2018-02-22)
New neurons in the adult brain are involved in sensory learning
Scientists from the Institut Pasteur and the CNRS have demonstrated that the new neurons produced in adults react preferentially to reward-related sensory stimuli and help speed up the association between sensory information and reward. (2018-02-22)
C-sections and gut bacteria increase risk of childhood obesity
New CHILD Study research has found that overweight and obese women are more like to have children who are overweight or obese by three years of age--and that bacteria in the gut may be partially to blame. (2018-02-22)
Securing a child's future needs to start during parents' teen years
A child's growth and development is affected by the health and lifestyles of their parents before pregnancy -- even going back to adolescence -- according to a new paper. (2018-02-21)
Midwifery linked to better birth outcomes in state-by-state 'report card'
Midwife-friendly laws and regulations tend to coincide with lower rates of premature births, cesarean deliveries and newborn deaths, according to a US-wide 'report card' that ranks each of the 50 states on the quality of their maternity care. (2018-02-21)
Scientists discover critical molecular biomarkers of preeclampsia
A new Tel Aviv University study identifies novel molecular biomarkers of preeclampsia, a sudden pregnancy complication, signaling the potential for an early diagnostic blood test. (2018-02-21)
Midwifery linked to better birth outcomes in state-by-state report cards
Midwife-friendly laws and regulations tend to coincide with lower rates of premature births, cesarean deliveries and newborn deaths, according to a new US-wide 'report card' that ranks all 50 states on the quality of their maternity care. (2018-02-21)
Number of obese years not -- just obesity -- a distinct risk factor for heart damage
In an analysis of clinical data collected on more than 9,000 people, Johns Hopkins researchers have shown that the number of years spent overweight or obese appear to 'add up' to a distinct risk factor that makes those with a longer history of heaviness more likely to test positive for a chemical marker of so-called 'silent' heart damage than those with a shorter history. (2018-02-20)
Low-fat or low-carb? It's a draw, Stanford study finds
New evidence from a study at the Stanford University School of Medicine might dismay those who have chosen sides in the low-fat versus low-carb diet debate. (2018-02-20)
Findings do not support suggestion that certain diets may be better for adults with certain genetic makeup
Weight loss over a year was not significantly different for overweight adults who followed a low-fat or low-carbohydrate diet, and neither a person's genetic makeup nor their insulin secretion level was associated with how much weight they lost. (2018-02-20)
Postnatal depression has life-long impact on mother-child relations
Postnatal depression (PND) can impact the quality of relationships between mother and child into adult life, and have a negative influence on the quality of relationships between grandmothers and grandchildren, new research at the University of Kent has discovered. (2018-02-20)
How to train like the world's most successful female cross-country skier
If you want to be as fast or as strong as the world's most decorated female winter Olympian ever, you'll have to train a lot -- more than 900 hours a year. (2018-02-16)
New research on the brain's backup motor systems could open door to novel stroke therapies
New research published in the Journal of Physiology could open the door to new therapies to improve the movement of arms and hands of stroke survivors. (2018-02-14)
ACA dependent coverage provision associated with increased use of prenatal care
The dependent coverage provision of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) that allowed young adults to stay on their parents' insurance until they were 26 was associated with increased use of prenatal care, increased private insurance payment for births, and a modest reduction in preterm births. (2018-02-13)
The end of yo-yo dieting? Monash researchers uncover brain switch that controls fat burning
Scientists have discovered a molecular switch in the brain that regulates fat burning -- and could provide a way to control weight gain following dieting. (2018-02-13)
PFASs, chemicals commonly found in environment, may interfere with body weight regulation
Boston, MA - A class of chemicals used in many industrial and consumer products was linked with greater weight gain after dieting, particularly among women, according to a study led by Harvard T.H. (2018-02-13)
Pregnant women deficient in vitamin D may give birth to obese children
Vitamin D deficiency in pregnant women could preprogram babies to grow into obese children and adults, according to a Keck School of Medicine of USC-led study. (2018-02-13)
New study shows vegan diet improves diabetes markers in overweight adults
A plant-based diet improves beta-cell function and insulin sensitivity in overweight adults with no history of diabetes, according to a new study published in Nutrients by researchers from the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine. (2018-02-12)
Study shows benefits of exercise can outweigh health effects of severe obesity
New study that shows physical activity may be equally and perhaps even more important than weight for people living with severe obesity. (2018-02-12)
New discovery offers hope of protecting premature babies from blindness
Now there is hope of a new way to protect extremely premature babies from impaired vision or blindness resulting from the eye disease retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). (2018-02-09)
Why you feel hungrier after you lose weight
Blame it on hormones: one hunger hormone continues to be elevated after you lose weight, making you feel hungry even though your new, slanker body has had enough to eat. (2018-02-08)
Enzyme plays a key role in calories burned both during obesity and dieting
Ever wonder why obese bodies burn less calories or why dieting often leads to a plateau in weight loss? (2018-02-08)
Metasurfaces enable improved optical lens performance
Producing the perfect color images we need and love often requires multiple, heavy lenses so that each color focuses in exactly the same plane. (2018-02-08)
Which fetal size standard should be used for diagnosing a small- or large-for-gestational-age fetus
In this special supplement to the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology (AJOG) leading experts describe six fetal growth size standards in current use and discuss their strengths and limitations. (2018-02-07)
What happens when women stop MS treatment during pregnancy?
Two new studies look at the effects of stopping the newer, stronger drug natalizumab for multiple sclerosis (MS) during pregnancy. (2018-02-07)
Tracking oxygen saturation, plus vital signs, to identify vulnerable preemies
While near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) long has been used to monitor oxygenation in conditions in which blood flow is altered, such as bleeding in the brain, how NIRS values relate to other vital sign measures in NICU babies was unknown. (2018-02-07)
Relationship factors affect decisions about contraceptive use among young adults
The dynamics of a couple's relationship, including the exclusivity of the partnership, the level of commitment to the partnership and participation in sexual decision-making with their partner, impact young adults' decisions related to contraceptive use, new research shows. (2018-02-06)
Health indicators for newborns of breast cancer survivors may vary by cancer type
In a study published in the International Journal of Cancer, researchers from the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center analyzed health indicators for children born to young breast cancer survivors in North Carolina. (2018-02-05)
Patients who achieve short-term weight loss before bariatric surgery have better outcomes
Patients who lose some excess weight prior to weight loss surgery achieve greater weight loss after surgery, and also experience shorter hospital stays and shorter procedures, according to Journal of American College of Surgeons study findings. (2018-02-02)
Scientists identify weight loss ripple effect
University of Connecticut researchers have found that when one member of a couple commits to losing weight, the chances are good their partner will lose some weight too, even if they are not actively participating in a weight loss intervention. (2018-02-01)
Induced labor after 39 weeks in healthy women may reduce the need for cesarean birth
In a study presented today at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's (SMFM) annual meeting, researchers unveiled findings that suggest that induction of labor at 39 weeks of gestation among healthy, first-time mothers reduces the rate of cesarean birth as compared to expectant management among the same population. (2018-02-01)
Maternal age over 40 is associated with an increased risk of preterm birth
Pregnant mothers aged 40 and over may have an increased risk for preterm birth, regardless of confounding factors, according to a study published Jan. (2018-01-31)
All in the family: Relatives of Zika virus may cause birth defects
Relatives of Zika virus can damage developing fetuses in mice and were able to replicate in human maternal and fetal tissues, researchers report. (2018-01-31)
Like Zika, West Nile virus causes fetal brain damage, death in mice
Two viruses closely related to Zika -- West Nile and Powassan -- can spread from an infected pregnant mouse to her fetuses, causing brain damage and fetal death, according to a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. (2018-01-31)
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