Current Lunar Surface News and Events

Current Lunar Surface News and Events, Lunar Surface News Articles.
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Intertropical Convergence Zone limits climate predictions in the tropical Atlantic
The strongest climate fluctuation on time scales of a few years is the so-called El Niño phenomenon, which originates in the Pacific. A similar circulation pattern exists in the Atlantic, which scientists under the leadership of GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel have studied in more detail. Their results, now published in the international journal Nature Communications, contribute to a better understanding of this climate fluctuation and pose a challenge for prediction models. (2021-01-15)

Infection biology: How one pathogen evades the immune system
A research team of Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munch led by Nicolai Siegel has uncovered a mechanism that enables the parasite that causes sleeping sickness in humans to escape the attention of the immune system. The finding may also be relevant to other infectious diseases. (2021-01-13)

Ferrofluid surface simulations go more than skin deep
Computer models efficiently and accurately simulate the magnetic responses of ferrofluids by considering only the fluid's surface. (2021-01-10)

Nanocrystals that eradicate bacteria biofilm
POSTECH-UNIST joint research team finds ways to control the surface texture of nanostructures. (2021-01-08)

Striped or spotted? Winds and jet streams found on the closest brown dwarf
Using high-precision brightness measurements from NASA's TESS space telescope, astronomers found that the nearby brown dwarf Luhman 16B's atmosphere is dominated by high-speed, global winds akin to Earth's jet stream system. This global circulation determines how clouds are distributed in the brown dwarf's atmosphere, giving it a striped appearance. (2021-01-07)

Imminent sudden stratospheric warming to occur, bringing increased risk of snow over coming weeks
A new study led by researchers at the Universities of Bristol, Exeter, and Bath helps to shed light on the winter weather we may soon have in store following a dramatic meteorological event currently unfolding high above the North Pole. Weather forecasting models are predicting with increasing confidence that a sudden stratospheric warming (SSW) event will take place today, 5 January 2021. (2021-01-05)

Scientists develop new land surface model including multiple processes and human activities
Researchers from the Institute of Atmospheric Physics developed a land surface model CAS-LSM that has improved the descriptions of biogeochemical process and urban modules, compared with the earlier version of this model. (2020-12-18)

New topological properties found in "old" material of Cobalt disulfide
Researchers working with the Schoop Lab discovered the presence of Weyl nodes in bulk CoS2 that allow them to make predictions about its surface properties. The material hosts Weyl-fermions and Fermi-arc surface states within its band structure, which may enable it to serve as a platform for exotic phenomena. (2020-12-18)

Tiny bubbles on electrodes key to speeding up chemical processes
New Curtin University-led research has shown the formation of bubbles on electrodes, usually thought to be a hindrance, can be beneficial, with deliberately added bubbles, or oil droplets, able to accelerate processes such as the removal of pollutants such as hydrocarbons from contaminated water and the production of chlorine. (2020-12-10)

Let the sunshine in: self-cleaning membrane under visible light treatment
The Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST) reported that the research team led by Dr. Jeehye Byun and Director Seok Won Hong from Water Cycle Research Center developed a membrane material that self-cleans biological contaminants through irradiation of sunlight. According to the team, the newly developed membrane material is expected to significantly reduce the cost of membrane management as the membrane can be reused after just 10 minutes of sunlight irradiation. (2020-12-09)

Dynamics in the root zone
Nutrient contamination of groundwater as a result of nitrogen-based fertilisers is a problem in many places in Europe. Calculations by a team of scientists led by the UFZ have shown that over a period of at least four months per year, nitrate can leach into the groundwater and surface water on about three-quarters of Europe's agricultural land. The proportion of areas at risk from nitrate leaching is thus almost twice as large as previously assumed. (2020-12-09)

Image-based navigation could help spacecraft safely land on the moon
In research recently published in the AIAA Journal of Spacecraft and Rockets, a multidisciplinary team of engineers demonstrated how a series of lunar images can be used to infer the direction that a spacecraft is moving. This technique, sometimes called visual odometry, allows navigation information to be gathered even when a good map isn't available. The goal is to allow spacecraft to more accurately target and land at a specific location on the moon without requiring a complete map of its surface. (2020-12-07)

Voyager spacecraft detect new type of solar electron burst
The Voyager spacecraft continue to make discoveries even as they travel through interstellar space. In a new study, University of Iowa physicists report on the Voyagers' detection of cosmic ray electrons associated with eruptions from the sun--more than 14 billion miles away. (2020-12-03)

Scientists apply the METRIC model to estimate the land surface evapotranspiration in Nepal
Scientists apply the METRIC model to estimate the land surface evapotranspiration in Nepal (2020-11-24)

Growing interest in Moon resources could cause tension, scientists find
An international team of scientists led by the Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian, has identified a problem with the growing interest in extractable resources on the moon: there aren't enough of them to go around. With no international policies or agreements to decide ''who gets what from where,'' scientists believe tensions, overcrowding, and quick exhaustion of resources to be one possible future for moon mining projects. The paper published today in the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A. (2020-11-23)

Palladium, meet copper: Skoltech researchers use machine learning to improve catalysts
Researchers from Skoltech and their colleagues from Germany and the US have studied the properties and behavior of a palladium-copper alloy under changing temperatures and hydrogen concentrations, with highly relevant implications of this research for catalyst design. The authors hope that their findings can open the door for designing metal alloys with better catalytic properties by taking into account dynamic changes in the composition and structure of materials at realistic operational conditions. (2020-11-17)

Peel-off coating keeps desalination cleaner and greener
A polyelectrolyte coating enables clean seawater desalination systems without harmful chemicals. (2020-11-16)

A new diagnostic method predicts which cancer patients will respond to immunothe
An international group led by Dr Banafshe Larijani, an Ikerbasque researcher seconded to the Biofisika Institute (UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country, CSIC), has developed a new diagnostic method making it possible to accurately predict which cancer patients will respond positively to immunotherapy. This method will allow oncologists to tailor treatment to each patient and avoid therapies that are not going to be successful. (2020-11-16)

Heat and dust help launch Martian water into space, scientists find
Scientists using an instrument aboard NASA's Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN, or MAVEN, spacecraft have discovered that water vapor near the surface of the Red Planet is lofted higher into the atmosphere than anyone expected was possible. (2020-11-13)

Escape from Mars: how water fled the red planet
Mars once had oceans but is now bone-dry, leaving many to wonder how the water was lost. University of Arizona researchers have discovered a surprisingly large amount of water in the upper atmosphere of Mars, where it is rapidly destroyed, explaining part of this Martian mystery. (2020-11-12)

Electrochemical oxygen evolution on Hf2B2Ir5 electrode material
Electrochemical oxygen evolution on Hf2B2Ir5 electrode material. (2020-11-11)

Silicone surface mimics topology, wettability of a real human tongue
The tongue helps people taste food, but structures on its surface also help them sense textures -- something that's also very important when savoring a meal. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces have made a 3D silicone surface that, for the first time, closely mimics the surface features of the human tongue. The material could help food scientists study mechanical interactions of foods, liquids and medicines with the organ. (2020-11-11)

Getting single-crystal diamond ready for electronics
Researchers from Osaka University and collaborating partners polished single-crystal diamond to near-atomic smoothness without damaging it. This will improve the performance and sustainability of future electronics. (2020-11-10)

SwRI scientist studies tiny craters on Bennu boulders to understand asteroid's age
Last week NASA snagged a sample from the surface of asteroid Bennu, an Empire State Building-sized body that Southwest Research Institute scientists have helped map with nearly unprecedented precision. Using orbital data from the OSIRIS-REx spacecraft, researchers measured centimeter- to meter-sized craters on the boulders scattered around its rugged surface to shed light on the age of the asteroid. (2020-11-10)

Germanium telluride's hidden properties at the nanoscale revealed
Germanium Telluride is an interesting candidate material for spintronic devices. In a comprehensive study at BESSY II, a Helmholtz-RSF Joint Research Group has now revealed how the spin texture switches by ferroelectric polarization within individual nanodomains. (2020-11-06)

Clay subsoil at Earth's driest place may signal life on Mars
Diverse microbes discovered in the clay-rich, shallow soil layers in Chile's dry Atacama Desert suggest that similar deposits below the Martian surface may contain microorganisms, which could be easily found by future rover missions or landing craft. (2020-11-05)

New mineral discovered in moon meteorite
The high-pressure mineral Donwilhelmsite, recently discovered in the lunar meteorite Oued Awlitis 001 from Apollo missions, is important for understanding the inner structure of the earth. (2020-11-03)

New remote sensing technique could bring key planetary mineral into focus
The mineral olivine, thought to be a major component inside all planetary bodies, holds secrets about the early formation of the solar system, and a team of Brown University researchers has a new way to study it remotely. (2020-11-02)

Asteroid's scars tell stories of its past
Asteroid Bennu, which was just sampled by NASA's OSIRIS-REx mission, only recently migrated into Earth's neighborhood, according to a detailed analysis of impact marks on boulders on its surface. The report provides a new benchmark for understanding the evolution of asteroids and offers insights into space debris hazardous to spacecraft. (2020-10-30)

Geologists simulate soil conditions to help grow plants on Mars
Humankind's next giant step may be onto Mars. But before those missions can begin, scientists need to make scores of breakthrough advances, including learning how to grow crops on the red planet. (2020-10-27)

Tiny moon shadows may harbor hidden stores of ice
Hidden pockets of water could be much more common on the surface of the moon than scientists once suspected, according to new research led by the University of Colorado Boulder. (2020-10-26)

OSIRIS-REx TAGs surface of asteroid Bennu
Captured on Oct. 20, 2020 during the OSIRIS-REx mission's Touch-And-Go (TAG) sample collection event, this series of images shows the SamCam imager's field of view as the NASA spacecraft approaches and touches down on asteroid Bennu's surface, over 200 million miles away from Earth. (2020-10-22)

New tool pulls elusive COVID-19 marker from human blood
Researchers at McMaster University and SQI Diagnostics in Canada have created a surface that repels every other element of human blood except an elusive cytokine critical to understanding the progress of COVID-19 in individual patients. (2020-10-20)

Sludge-powered bacteria generate more electricity, faster
A new electroactive bacterium could help fuel wastewater treatment reactors. (2020-10-19)

Magnetic fields on the moon are the remnant of an ancient core dynamo
An international simulation study by scientists from the US, Australia, and Germany, shows that alternative explanatory models such as asteroid impacts do not generate sufficiently large magnetic fields. (2020-10-15)

Cartilage-Inspired, Lipid-Based and Super Slippery Synthetic Hydrogels
Drawing inspiration from the mechanisms that lubricate the cartilage in our joints over a lifetime of wear, researchers designed extremely slippery hydrogels with self-renewing, lipid-based boundary layers, which result in a near 100-fold reduction in friction and wear over other hydrogels. (2020-10-15)

Surface waves can help nanostructured devices keep their cool
A research team led by The Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo demonstrated that hybrid surface waves called surface phonon-polaritons provide enhanced thermal conductivity in nanoscale membranes. These surface waves can aid in the thermal management of nanostructured devices as conventional cooling methods reach their material-related limits. Surface phonon-polaritons will be particularly useful for heat conduction in silicon-based microelectronics and photonics applications. (2020-10-12)

Sapphires show their true colors: Not water-loving
The researchers investigated the wetting behavior of four different crystal surfaces of sapphire (alumina) single crystal and found that although the surface of polycrystalline alumina is hydrophilic (water contact angle was about 10°), the intrinsic water contact angles of all four crystal surfaces are greater than 10°. Among them, the (1-102) crystal surface is intrinsic hydrophobic, which water contact angle is close to 90°. (2020-10-10)

What tiny surfing robots teach us about surface tension
Propelled by chemical changes in surface tension, microrobots surfing across fluid interfaces lead researchers to new ideas. (2020-10-09)

New findings from OSIRIS-REx detail complex history of Asteroid Bennu
Six new studies in Science and Science Advances present results from the OSIRIS-REx spacecraft and reveal insights about the near-Earth asteroid Bennu. (2020-10-08)

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