Current Lung Cancer News and Events

Current Lung Cancer News and Events, Lung Cancer News Articles.
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Missing protein helps small cell lung cancer evade immune defenses
Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cells are missing a surface protein that triggers an immune response, allowing them to hide from one of the body's key cancer defenses, a new study led by UT Southwestern researchers suggests. The findings, reported online today in Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research, could lead to new treatments for SCLC, which has no effective therapies. (2021-01-25)

Bioorthogonally catalyzed lethality strategy generates targeting drugs within tumor
Selectively killing tumor while not causing damage to normal cells still remains a challenge in cancer chemotherapy. Professor Hongke Liu from Nanjing Normal University together with Professor Jing Zhao and Professor Zijian Guo from Nanjing University developed a novel strategy---bioorthogonally-catalyzed lethality to generate efficient anticancer species between two non-toxic components only within cancer cells and tumors without external catalysts, realizing the precise and efficient anticancer chemotherapy. (2021-01-25)

Potential combined drug therapy for lung cancer
Researchers at Kanazawa University report in Clinical Cancer Research that in the most common type of lung cancer, certain secondary mutations occurring with another gene alteration known as ALK make the efficacy of alectinib, an otherwise commonly used drug for treating lung cancer, become unfavorable. Combining alectinib with another kind of drug can overcome this adverse effect, however. (2021-01-22)

Novel target identified that could improve safety of therapy for pancreatic cancer
Researchers from Queen Mary University of London, have identified a protein that may represent a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Using this protein as a target, the team successfully created a CAR T cell therapy - a type of immunotherapy - that killed pancreatic cancer cells in a pre-clinical model. (2021-01-22)

University of Cincinnati research unveils possible new combo therapy for head and neck cancer
Researchers at the University of Cincinnati have tested a new combination therapy in animal models to see if they could find a way to make an already effective treatment even better. Since they're using a Food and Drug Administration-approved drug to do it, this could help people sooner than later. (2021-01-22)

New study on the role of monocytes in sarcoidosis
The cause of the inflammatory lung disease sarcoidosis is unknown. In a new study, researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have investigated whether a type of immune cell called a monocyte could be a key player in sarcoidosis pathogenesis and explain why some patients develop more severe and chronic disease than others. The study, which is published in The European Respiratory Journal, opens new possibilities for future diagnostic and therapeutic methods. (2021-01-21)

Study updates breast cancer risk estimates for women with no family history
A new multi-institution study led by Fergus Couch, Ph.D., a Mayo Clinic pathologist, provides more accurate estimates of breast cancer risk for U.S. women who harbor inherited mutations in breast cancer predisposition genes. The findings of the CARRIERS Consortium study, published Jan. 20 in The New England Journal of Medicine, may allow health care providers to better assess the risk of breast cancer in women ? many of whom have no family history of breast cancer. (2021-01-21)

Study defines small-cell lung cancer subtypes and distinct therapeutic vulnerabilities for each type
Researchers from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have developed the first comprehensive framework to classify small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) into four unique subtypes, based on gene expression, and have identified potential therapeutic targets for each type in a study published today in Cancer Cell. (2021-01-21)

New combination of immunotherapies shows great promise for treating lung cancer
McMaster University researchers have established in lab settings that a novel combination of two forms of immunotherapy can be highly effective for treating lung cancer, which causes more deaths than any other form of cancer. (2021-01-21)

Scientists discover link between nicotine and breast cancer metastasis
Scientists at Wake Forest School of Medicine have found that nicotine promotes the spread of breast cancer cells into the lungs. (2021-01-20)

Reviving exhausted immune cells to fight cancer
Eliminating a single gene can turn exhausted cancer-fighting immune cells known as CD8+ T cells back into refreshed soldiers that can continue to battle malignant tumors, a new study led by UT Southwestern researchers suggests. The findings, published online this week in the Journal for Immunotherapy of Cancer, could offer a new way to harness the body's immune system to attack cancers. (2021-01-20)

Target of new cancer treatment valid for breast as well as blood cancers: study
Newly published research shows that a new anti-cancer drug developed at the University of Alberta, set to begin human trials this year, may work against breast cancer as well as blood cancer. (2021-01-20)

Cancer-related suicide declined in the US during the past two decades
Despite increases in overall suicide rates in the United States during the past two decades, cancer-related suicides declined by 2.8% per year, according to a new study by the American Cancer Society. (2021-01-19)

Single-cell test can reveal precisely how drugs kill cancer cells
Researchers from the Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology (QIBEBT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) have developed a method named D2O-probed CANcer Susceptibility Test Ramanometry (D2O-CANST-R) to see, at single-cell/organelle level, how pharmaceuticals induce cancer cell death and how cancer cells adapt. (2021-01-19)

Report shows alcohol consumption linked to portion of cancer incidence and mortality
A new study finds that alcohol consumption accounts for a considerable portion of cancer incidence and mortality in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. (2021-01-19)

Routine thoracic surgery safe during COVID-19 pandemic
A study in the Journal of Thoracic Oncology (JTO) comparing surgeries performed at one Chinese hospital in 2019 with a similar date range during the COVID-19 pandemic found that routine thoracic surgery and invasive examinations were performed safely. The JTO is the official journal of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer. (2021-01-19)

Esophageal cancer patients show abundance of oral pathogens
DNA from various oral bacterial pathogens has been found in tumors from esophageal cancer patients. Researchers led by Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) examined bacterial pathogens in plaque and saliva from esophageal cancer patients, determining that a prevalence of three species in particular, along with alcohol consumption, is associated with a high risk of esophageal cancer. Screening of oral pathogens could therefore be used for early disease detection. (2021-01-14)

Moffitt researchers discover biochemical pathway that protects cells from ferroptosis
In an article published in Cell Metabolism, Moffitt Cancer Center researchers report on a newly discovered biochemical pathway that protects cells from a type of cell death called ferroptosis. (2021-01-14)

Record drop in cancer mortality for second straight year due to improved lung cancer treatment
Overall cancer death rates in the United States dropped continuously from 1991 through 2018 for a total decrease of 31%, including a 2.4% decline from 2017 to 2018. (2021-01-12)

A CNIO study links severe COVID-19 disease to short telomeres
The data show that telomeres are shorter in patients suffering more severe COVID-19 pathologies. The researchers propose that one of the consequences of the viral infection is shortening of the telomeres, which, in turn, hampers the regeneration of lung tissue and causes prolonged sequelae in some patients. The study, published in the journal 'Aging', suggests the usefulness of a possible therapy for patients with post-COVID pulmonary injury based on activation of the enzyme telomerase. (2021-01-11)

Why COVID-19 pneumonia lasts longer, causes more damage than typical pneumonia
COVID pneumonia is significantly different from pneumonia caused by other causes, reports a new study in Nature. It shows how hijacks the lungs' own immune cells and uses them to spread across the lung over weeks. The infection leaves damage in its wake and fuels the fever, low blood pressure and damage to the kidneys, brain, heart and other organs in patients with COVID-19. Scientists discovered a target for treating COVID pneumonia and a clinical trial is underway at Northwestern. (2021-01-11)

Initial severity of COVID-19 not associated with later respiratory complications
A new study published online in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society examines the recovery of lung function and overall wellness in individuals who had varying degrees of COVID-19 severity. Little is known about lung health following infection with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, and whether later respiratory problems, fatigue and ill health are associated with the disease's initial severity. (2021-01-08)

Immune cells discovered in the lungs improve virus defense
A research team at the University of Basel has discovered immune cells resident in the lungs that persist long after a bout of flu. Experiments with mice have shown that these helper cells improve the immune response to reinfection by a different strain of the flu virus. The discovery could yield approaches to developing longer-lasting vaccinations against quickly-mutating viruses. (2021-01-08)

Deep learning helps predicting occult peritoneal metastasis in stomach cancer
A new study led by the Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology (SIAT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences shows that deep learning can help predicting the occult peritoneal metastasis in stomach cancer. It provides a novel and noninvasive approach for stomach cancer patients and may inform individualized surgical management of stomach cancer. (2021-01-07)

Researchers uncover a potential treatment for an aggressive form of lung cancer
DALLAS - Jan. 5, 2021 - Researchers at the Children's Medical Center Research Institute at UT Southwestern (CRI) have discovered a new metabolic vulnerability in a highly aggressive form of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). These findings could pave the way for new treatments for patients with mutations in two key genes - KRAS and LKB1. Patients whose tumors contain both of these mutations, known as KL tumors, have poor outcomes and usually do not respond to immunotherapy. (2021-01-05)

New imaging method reveals if antibiotics reach bacteria hiding in tissues
Researchers at the Francis Crick Institute and the University of Western Australia have developed a new imaging method to see where antibiotics have reached bacteria within tissues. The method could be used to help develop more effective antibiotic treatments, reducing the risk of antibiotic resistance. (2021-01-05)

In-utero exposures associated with increased risk of thyroid cancer
A recent study shows that thyroid cancer is related to in-utero exposures. (2021-01-05)

Alpha-ray missile therapy: tumor cells attacked from intracellular region
Researchers from Osaka University have innovated a technique of irradiating cancer from within. They tagged α-methyl-L-tyrosine with 211Astatine, an α-emitter, to prepare 211At-AAMT; this radiopharmaceutical was effectively conveyed into cancer cells by the amino acid transporter LAT1. Alpha radiation combines high linear energy transfer with minimal tissue penetration, damaging cancer cells lethally while sparing surrounding normal tissue. This strategy may prove a breakthrough in the management of intractable or advanced cancers. (2021-01-04)

Study explains why patients with cancer spread to the liver have worse outcomes
A new study finds that tumors in the liver siphon off critical immune cells, rendering immunotherapy ineffective. But coupling immunotherapy with radiotherapy to the liver in mice restored the immune cell function and led to better outcomes. (2021-01-04)

COVID-19's impact on cancer prevention and control in Africa
When the COVID-19 pandemic reached Africa, the continent was already struggling to deal with another public health crisis - a growing cancer epidemic characterized by more than one million new cancer cases and nearly 700,000 deaths per year. (2020-12-31)

New research may explain severe virus attacks on the lungs
In some cases, immune cells in the lungs can contribute to worsening a virus attack. In a new study, researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden describe how different kinds of immune cells, called macrophages, develop in the lungs and which of them may be behind severe lung diseases. The study, which was published in Immunity, may contribute to future treatments for COVID-19, among other diseases. (2020-12-30)

Molecular reporters expose the allies of the brain tumor
Until recently, it was unclear how and why cancer cells adapt to their environment. A team led by Gaetano Gargiulo at MDC has now developed a technology that can be used to observe the molecular processes in living cells. The researchers present their results in the journal Cancer Discovery. (2020-12-23)

Study finds cancer survivors run greater risk of developing, dying from second cancers
A new American Cancer Society study finds that adult-onset cancer survivors run a greater risk of developing and dying from subsequent primary cancers (SPCs) than the general population. (2020-12-22)

Promising clinical data for fenofibrate's ability to prevent lung damage in COVID patients
In what has the potential to significantly change how Corona patients are being treated and the severity of the disease, research spearheaded at Jerusalem's Hebrew University gathered early clinical evidence demonstrating the efficacy of an existing drug in treating COVID-19. (2020-12-22)

Researcher uses machine learning to demonstrate that DNA impacts cancer risk
University of Calgary researcher uses machine learning to demonstrate that DNA impacts cancer risk. Team identifies seven DNA fingerprints or patterns that define cancer risk. One of the seven germlines offers protection from developing cancer, and the other six germlines present a greater risk for cancer. It is the first time scientists have described these highly-specialized biological patterns applicable to cancer risk. Discovery refines the long-held views of why people get cancer. (2020-12-22)

The Achilles' heel of cancer stem cells
Colon cancer stem cells have one weak spot: the enzyme Mll1. An MDC team led by Walter Birchmeier has now shown in Nature Communications that blocking this protein prevents the development of new tumors in the body. (2020-12-21)

Prostate cancer regulator plays role in COVID-19, providing a promising treatment lead
By taking a lesson from prostate cancer, researchers now have a promising lead on a treatment for COVID-19. They found that, just like in prostate cancer, TMPRSS2 is regulated by the androgen receptor in the lungs. And notably, blocking the androgen receptor led to lower expression of TMPRSS2, which led to decreased coronavirus infection in mice and cellular models. (2020-12-21)

Arthritis drug may treat immunotherapy-related heart complication
A drug typically prescribed for rheumatoid arthritis may also be effective in treating a rare but potentially deadly heart complication some cancer patients experience after taking immunotherapies, according to a study published in Cancer Discovery and co-led by investigators at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC). (2020-12-21)

Loss of anti-tumor protein may cause resistance to certain cancer therapies
The absence of a protein that works to prevent tumor formation may explain why some patients are resistant to a common cancer therapy, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. They said that testing cancers for the presence of this protein may help clinicians identify patients who may be resistant to or relapse when treated with the therapy. (2020-12-21)

Nanotechnology -- nanoparticles as weapons against cancer
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich researchers have developed a novel type of nanoparticle that efficiently and selectively kills cancer cells, thus opening up new therapeutic options for the treatment of tumors. (2020-12-18)

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