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Current Lung Function News and Events, Lung Function News Articles.
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NIH researchers report first 3-D structure of DHHC enzymes
The first three-dimensional structure of DHHC proteins -- enzymes involved in many cellular processes, including cancer -- explains how they function and may offer a blueprint for designing therapeutic drugs. (2018-01-11)

Media Availability: The coming of age of gene therapy: A review of the past and path forward
After three decades of hopes tempered by setbacks, gene therapy -- the process of treating a disease by modifying a person's DNA -- is no longer the future of medicine, but is part of the present-day clinical treatment toolkit. The Jan. 12 issue of the journal Science provides an in-depth and timely review of the key developments that have led to several successful gene therapy treatments for patients with serious medical conditions. (2018-01-11)

Researchers demonstrate RAS dimers are essential for cancer
Researchers at UT Southwestern's Simmons Cancer Center have shown that RAS molecules act in pairs, known as dimers, to cause cancer, findings that could help guide them to a treatment. (2018-01-11)

Certain factors may predict lung cancer patients' response to chemotherapy
In a retrospective analysis of 73 lung squamous cell carcinoma patients treated with the chemotherapy regimen of gemcitabine plus cisplatin, higher body mass index and younger age were linked with longer progression-free survival, the length of time that a patient lives with cancer but it does not get worse. Patients with better response to treatment and higher body mass index had longer overall survival in the Thoracic Cancer analysis. (2018-01-10)

Chemoradiation in elderly patients with stage III NSCLC improves overall survival
Elderly patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) showed improved overall survival when treated with chemoradiation compared to definitive radiation alone. (2018-01-10)

Study uncovers healthcare disparities among octogenarians and nonagenarians with advanced lung cancer
A new study reveals that, among patients of advanced age with stage III lung cancer, African Americans and individuals who live in lower income areas are more likely to not receive any treatment. (2018-01-08)

Novel PET tracer clearly identifies and tracks bacterial infection in lungs
Researchers at the University of Louisville, Kentucky, have demonstrated that a new radiotracer, 2-18F-fluorodeoxysorbitol (18F-FDS), can identify and track bacterial infection in lungs better than current imaging methods and is able to differentiate bacterial infection from inflammation. The study is the featured basic science article in the January issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine. (2018-01-08)

Preventing and treating acute chest syndrome in children with sickle cell disease
Acute chest syndrome (ACS), a potentially severe lung complication of sickle cell disease, increases a child's risk of respiratory failure, chronic lung disease, and prolonged hospitalization if not recognized early and treated effectively. (2018-01-05)

Cancer mortality in the US continues decades-long drop
The cancer death rate dropped 1.7 percent from 2014 to 2015, continuing a drop that began in 1991 and has reached 26 percent, resulting in nearly 2.4 million fewer cancer deaths during that time. (2018-01-04)

Defect in zinc supply mechanism affects pathology of intractable pulmonary diseases
Japanese researchers revealed that abnormal delivery of zinc to lung cells contributes to obstructive pulmonary diseases. They further showed that mRNA splicing abnormalities are involved in the detailed mechanism. So far, the importance of zinc in the lung has only been understood from a nutritional aspect. This discovery is thought to be the first to clarify zinc's effects on the regulation of mRNA ligation (splicing), and its involvement in the onset of pulmonary diseases. (2017-12-28)

Pulmonary fibrosis caused by single transcription factor
Reduced FoxO3 activity reprograms connective tissue cells, triggering the disease. (2017-12-26)

Diet rich in apples and tomatoes may help repair lungs of ex-smokers, study suggests
A study from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found the natural decline in lung function over a 10-year period was slower among former smokers with a diet high in tomatoes and fruits, especially apples, suggesting certain components in these foods might help restore lung damage caused by smoking. (2017-12-21)

A kiss of death for prostate cancer
Hokkaido University researchers have uncovered a cellular protein that stabilizes a tumor promoting signaling pathway, suggesting a new target to treat prostate cancer. (2017-12-21)

Obesity can add five weeks of asthma symptoms per year in preschoolers
Asthma affects almost 1 in 10 children in the US and is a leading cause of emergency room visits and hospitalizations in preschoolers. According to new research from Duke Health and collaborators, symptoms may be worse for children ages 2 to 5 who are overweight. (2017-12-19)

Radiosurgery or whole-brain radiation in patients with multiple brain metastases?
A University of Colorado Cancer Center study publishing in the Journal of Thoracic Oncology shows that in a subset of patients, radiosurgery may be the best choice even when the number of brain lesions far exceeds the established three-lesion threshold. (2017-12-18)

Nanoparticles as a solution against antibiotic resistance?
Scientists of the Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Germany succeeded in developing an efficient method to treat mucoviscidosis. Crucial are nanoparticles that transport the antibiotics more efficiently to their destination. First of all, the active particles need to have a certain size to be able to reach the deeper airways and not to bounce off somewhere else before. Ultimately, they have to penetrate the thick layer of mucus on the airways as well as the lower layers of the bacteria biofilm. (2017-12-15)

Even smokers may benefit from targeted lung cancer treatments
No matter a patient's smoking history, when a targetable genetic alteration is present, matching the alteration with the appropriate targeted therapy is associated with a survival benefit of 1.5 years. (2017-12-13)

Protein structure could unlock new treatments for cystic fibrosis
Biochemists at the University of Zurich have used cryo-electron microscopy to determine the detailed architecture of the chloride channel TMEM16A. This protein is a promising target for the development of effective drugs to treat cystic fibrosis. (2017-12-13)

Three papers help to crack the code of coenzyme Q biosynthesis
Coenzyme Q (CoQ) is a vital cog in the body's energy-producing machinery, a kind of chemical gateway in the conversion of food into cellular fuel. But six decades removed from its discovery, scientists still can't describe exactly how and when it is made. (2017-12-13)

The immune cells that help tumors instead of destroying them
EPFL scientists have discovered that neutrophils, a type of immune cell, can actually help lung tumors grow. The work is published in Cell Reports, and has enormous implications for cancer immunotherapy. (2017-12-12)

Cancer gene plays key role in cystic fibrosis lung infections
PTEN, a tumor suppressor, helps clear lung infections when attached to a protein in lung tissue. But in cystic fibrosis, the protein is mutated, and doesn't latch onto PTEN. (2017-12-12)

Cancer-causing mutation suppresses immune system around tumours
A new study shows that mutations in 'Ras' genes, which drive 25 percent of human cancers by causing tumour cells to grow, multiply and spread, can also protect cancer cells from the immune system. The research reveals that mutated Ras genes can suppress the immune system around tumours by increasing levels of a protein called 'PD-L1'. Small amounts of PD-L1 exist naturally in the body to prevent the immune system from attacking healthy cells, but cancer cells can exploit this to protect themselves. (2017-12-12)

Research leads to call for lung health screening at top football clubs
New research from the University of Kent has discovered that nearly three in 10 elite footballers at top clubs in England have undetected lung and airway problems that could impair their on-field performance. The findings of this study will be presented at a British Thoracic Society meeting on Dec. 8 by lead researcher Anna Jackson, who will also call for all top football clubs to implement a lung health screening program. (2017-12-08)

In lab research, scientists slow progression of a fatal form of muscular dystrophy
Saint Louis University researchers report that a new drug reduces fibrosis (scarring) and prevents loss of muscle function in an animal model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). (2017-12-08)

Scientists shed light on a tumor-suppressive protein in metastases
?A new study conducted at the VIB-KU Leuven Center for Cancer Biology in Belgium has labeled the protein Caveolin-1 as a high-potential pursuit in the fight against cancer. Many research projects have already implicated this protein in both tumor-promotive and suppressive functions, but its exact role remained elusive. By examining macrophages at the sites of metastases, the scientists have now described the 'anti-metastatic surveillance' role of Caveolin-1 for the first time. (2017-12-05)

Researchers use nanoparticles to target, kill endometrial cancer
For the first time, researchers combined traditional chemotherapy with a relatively new cancer drug that attacks chemo-resistant tumor cells, loaded both into tiny nanoparticles, and created an extremely selective and lethal cancer treatment. Results of the three-year lab study to be published Dec. 4 in the journal Nature Nanotechnology. (2017-12-04)

Thyroid hormone therapy heals lung fibrosis in animal study
Thyroid hormone therapy significantly resolves fibrosis, or scarring, in the lungs of mice, increasing their survival from disease, a Yale-led study shows. These provide a novel insight into the development of pulmonary fibrosis and could lead to alternative treatment for this serious condition, according to the researchers. (2017-12-04)

'Aggressive' surgery is best treatment option for early stage lung cancer
Patients with early stage lung cancer live longer when they receive a lobectomy -- the most common type of operation for the disease -- rather than a less extensive operation or radiation treatment, according to a study published online today in The Annals of Thoracic Surgery. (2017-11-30)

Two-drug combination may boost immunotherapy responses in lung cancer patients
Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center researchers and colleagues have identified a novel drug combination therapy that could prime nonsmall cell lung cancers to respond better to immunotherapy. These so-called epigenetic therapy drugs, used together, achieved robust anti-tumor responses in human cancer cell lines and mice. (2017-11-30)

Communication between lung tumors and bones contributes to tumor progression
Massachusetts General Hospital investigators have identified a way in which a type of lung cancer co-opts a portion of the immune system to increase tumor progression. (2017-11-30)

How bone cells promote lung cancer growth
A certain type of cell in the bone marrow can help promote tumor growth in mice with early stage lung cancer, a new study finds. (2017-11-30)

Targeted treatment could prevent spread of pancreatic cancer, heart damage
Researchers at the University of Cincinnati (UC) College of Medicine have shown that a new targeted treatment could benefit patients with certain pancreatic tumors by preventing spread of the cancer and protecting their heart from damage -- a direct result of the tumor. Higher levels of serotonin among other tumor secretions can cause injury to the valves of the heart over time, leading to cardiac impairment -- a condition referred to as cardiac carcinoid disease -- in these patients. (2017-11-30)

Study shows lower lung cancer rates in communities with strong smoke-free laws
Researchers at the University of Kentucky studied the correlation between communities with strong smoke-free workplace laws and the number of new lung cancer diagnoses. Those communities have 8% fewer new cases than communities with weak or no workplace laws. (2017-11-29)

People born premature have smaller airways causing respiratory problems
People born prematurely may have smaller airways than those born at full term, which can cause respiratory problems. That's according to research published in Experimental Physiology today. (2017-11-29)

Experts urge Europe to start planning for lung cancer screening
Leading lung cancer specialists are urging EU countries to take action to initiate life-saving lung cancer screening programs as soon as possible. The EU Position Statement on Lung Cancer Screening has been published today in Lancet Oncology. It presents the available evidence and the major issues that need to be addressed by policymakers to ensure lung screening programs are successful -- with a strong recommendation that Europe must start planning for implementation within the next 18 months. (2017-11-27)

Lung cancer triggers pulmonary hypertension
Nearly half of all advanced-stage lung cancer patients develop arterial pulmonary hypertension. (2017-11-22)

Do education and poverty affect knee surgery success?
In an Arthritis Care & Research study of individuals who underwent total knee replacement, those who did not attend college had worse pain and function after two years if they lived in poor communities, but educational level was not linked with pain or function in wealthy communities. (2017-11-22)

Encouraging oxygen's assault on iron may offer new way to kill lung cancer cells
Blocking the action of a key protein frees oxygen to damage iron-dependent proteins in lung and breast cancer cells, making them easier to kill. (2017-11-22)

Pneumonia: Treatment with vaccines instead of antibiotics
A properly functioning immune system is key to resolve bacterial pneumonia. Researchers from the University Children's Hospital Zurich and UZH working with an international team have now found that specific immune cells are crucial for recovery. The researchers' work paves the way for developing new vaccines, which would also counteract the emerging resistance to antibiotics. (2017-11-21)

Turtles & technology advance understanding of lung abnormality
A study of an unusual snapping turtle with one lung found shared characteristics with humans born with one lung who survive beyond infancy. Digital 3-D anatomical models created by Emma Schachner, PhD, Assistant Professor of Cell Biology & Anatomy at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, made the detailed research possible. (2017-11-21)

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