Current Lung Transplant News and Events

Current Lung Transplant News and Events, Lung Transplant News Articles.
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Vaccine delivered via skin could help in fight against respiratory diseases
Brigham's Thomas Kupper, MD, and co-authors present results from preclinical studies suggesting skin scarification may help generate lung T cells and provide protection against infectious diseases, with implications for prevention of COVID-19. (2021-01-27)

Lung-MAP translational discoveries shared at 2020 World Conference on Lung Cancer
Investigators leading the Lung Cancer Master Protocol, or Lung-MAP trial, will present findings from three translational medicine studies at the 2020 World Conference on Lung Cancer, to be held online January 28-31, 2021. (2021-01-27)

Germline whole exome sequencing reveals the potential role of hereditary predisposition and therapeutic implications in small cell lung cancer, a tobacco-related cancer
A study presented today by Dr. Nobuyuki Takahashi of the Center for Cancer Research (CCR), National Cancer Institute (NCI), Bethesda, Md. at the IASLC World Conference on Lung Cancer Singapore demonstrates that small cell lung cancer (SCLC) may have an inherited predisposition and lays the foundation for understanding the interaction between genotype and tobacco exposure in exacerbating SCLC risk as well as potential therapeutic implications (2021-01-27)

Potential combined drug therapy for lung cancer
Researchers at Kanazawa University report in Clinical Cancer Research that in the most common type of lung cancer, certain secondary mutations occurring with another gene alteration known as ALK make the efficacy of alectinib, an otherwise commonly used drug for treating lung cancer, become unfavorable. Combining alectinib with another kind of drug can overcome this adverse effect, however. (2021-01-22)

New study on the role of monocytes in sarcoidosis
The cause of the inflammatory lung disease sarcoidosis is unknown. In a new study, researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have investigated whether a type of immune cell called a monocyte could be a key player in sarcoidosis pathogenesis and explain why some patients develop more severe and chronic disease than others. The study, which is published in The European Respiratory Journal, opens new possibilities for future diagnostic and therapeutic methods. (2021-01-21)

Study defines small-cell lung cancer subtypes and distinct therapeutic vulnerabilities for each type
Researchers from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have developed the first comprehensive framework to classify small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) into four unique subtypes, based on gene expression, and have identified potential therapeutic targets for each type in a study published today in Cancer Cell. (2021-01-21)

New combination of immunotherapies shows great promise for treating lung cancer
McMaster University researchers have established in lab settings that a novel combination of two forms of immunotherapy can be highly effective for treating lung cancer, which causes more deaths than any other form of cancer. (2021-01-21)

Hematopoietic stem cell transplants may provide long-term benefit for people with MS
A new study shows that intense immunosuppression followed by a hematopoietic stem cell transplant may prevent disability associated with multiple sclerosis (MS) from getting worse in 71% of people with relapsing-remitting MS for up to 10 years after the treatment. The research is published in the January 20, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study also found that in some people their disability improved over 10 years after treatment. (2021-01-20)

Scientists discover link between nicotine and breast cancer metastasis
Scientists at Wake Forest School of Medicine have found that nicotine promotes the spread of breast cancer cells into the lungs. (2021-01-20)

Cancer-related suicide declined in the US during the past two decades
Despite increases in overall suicide rates in the United States during the past two decades, cancer-related suicides declined by 2.8% per year, according to a new study by the American Cancer Society. (2021-01-19)

Routine thoracic surgery safe during COVID-19 pandemic
A study in the Journal of Thoracic Oncology (JTO) comparing surgeries performed at one Chinese hospital in 2019 with a similar date range during the COVID-19 pandemic found that routine thoracic surgery and invasive examinations were performed safely. The JTO is the official journal of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer. (2021-01-19)

Armouring anti-cancer T cells against immunosuppressants
New 'armoured' T cells attack cancer without being suppressed by drugs given to transplant patients to avoid organ rejection. (2021-01-18)

Scoring system to redefine how U.S. patients prioritized for liver transplant
Researchers with Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine are collaborating with faculty at the University of Pennsylvania to develop a risk score that more comprehensively prioritizes liver cancer patients for transplantation. (2021-01-13)

Hope for children with rare heart condition: novel stem cell therapy to save the day
In a new study, scientists at Okayama University isolated cardiac stem cells and assessed their potential use as regenerative therapy in young patients with cardiac defects. They confirmed the safety and effectiveness of their proposed treatment in early-phase trials and even identified the mechanism through which the stem cells improved cardiac function. Based on these preliminary findings, they hope to proceed to larger clinical trials and move towards pharmaceutical approval in the future. (2021-01-12)

Record drop in cancer mortality for second straight year due to improved lung cancer treatment
Overall cancer death rates in the United States dropped continuously from 1991 through 2018 for a total decrease of 31%, including a 2.4% decline from 2017 to 2018. (2021-01-12)

Non-Hispanic Black patients are disproportionately left off liver transplant waitlists
A new study of liver transplant centers confirms that non-Hispanic white patients get placed on liver transplant waitlists at disproportionately higher rates than non-Hispanic Black patients. (2021-01-11)

A CNIO study links severe COVID-19 disease to short telomeres
The data show that telomeres are shorter in patients suffering more severe COVID-19 pathologies. The researchers propose that one of the consequences of the viral infection is shortening of the telomeres, which, in turn, hampers the regeneration of lung tissue and causes prolonged sequelae in some patients. The study, published in the journal 'Aging', suggests the usefulness of a possible therapy for patients with post-COVID pulmonary injury based on activation of the enzyme telomerase. (2021-01-11)

Why COVID-19 pneumonia lasts longer, causes more damage than typical pneumonia
COVID pneumonia is significantly different from pneumonia caused by other causes, reports a new study in Nature. It shows how hijacks the lungs' own immune cells and uses them to spread across the lung over weeks. The infection leaves damage in its wake and fuels the fever, low blood pressure and damage to the kidneys, brain, heart and other organs in patients with COVID-19. Scientists discovered a target for treating COVID pneumonia and a clinical trial is underway at Northwestern. (2021-01-11)

Initial severity of COVID-19 not associated with later respiratory complications
A new study published online in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society examines the recovery of lung function and overall wellness in individuals who had varying degrees of COVID-19 severity. Little is known about lung health following infection with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, and whether later respiratory problems, fatigue and ill health are associated with the disease's initial severity. (2021-01-08)

Immune cells discovered in the lungs improve virus defense
A research team at the University of Basel has discovered immune cells resident in the lungs that persist long after a bout of flu. Experiments with mice have shown that these helper cells improve the immune response to reinfection by a different strain of the flu virus. The discovery could yield approaches to developing longer-lasting vaccinations against quickly-mutating viruses. (2021-01-08)

IU research findings could reduce treatment-related complication for blood cancer patients
Researchers at the Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Comprehensive Cancer Center published promising findings today in the New England Journal of Medicine on preventing a common complication to lifesaving blood stem cell transplantation in leukemia. (2021-01-07)

COVID-19 outcomes for patients on immunosuppressive drugs on par with non- immunosuppressed patients
People taking immunosuppressive drugs to prevent organ transplant rejection or to treat inflammatory or autoimmune diseases do not fare worse than others on average when they are hospitalized with COVID-19. (2021-01-07)

University of Miami leads groundbreaking trial for COVID-19 treatment
University of Miami Miller School of Medicine researchers led a unique and groundbreaking randomized controlled trial showing umbilical cord derived mesenchymal stem cell infusions safely reduce risk of death and quicken time to recovery for the severest COVID-19 patients, according to results published in STEM CELLS Translational Medicine in January 2021. (2021-01-05)

New clues on why pregnancy may increase risk of organ transplant rejection
A research study at the University of Chicago has found that in pregnancy, while the T cell response to a fetus becomes tolerant to allow for successful pregnancy, the part of the immune system that produces antibodies (known as the humoral response) becomes sensitized, creating memory B cells that can later contribute to the rejection of a transplanted organ. (2021-01-04)

Frailty is a factor in higher mortality for women awaiting liver transplants
Women awaiting liver transplants in the United States are known to be about one-third more likely than men to become too ill to undergo surgery or die before receiving a liver. Now a study headed by UC San Francisco and Columbia University highlights the role that frailty plays in this gender gap. (2020-12-30)

New research may explain severe virus attacks on the lungs
In some cases, immune cells in the lungs can contribute to worsening a virus attack. In a new study, researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden describe how different kinds of immune cells, called macrophages, develop in the lungs and which of them may be behind severe lung diseases. The study, which was published in Immunity, may contribute to future treatments for COVID-19, among other diseases. (2020-12-30)

Liquid bandage detects tissue oxygenation without the drawbacks of wired oximeters
A paint-on, transparent bandage containing phosphorescent materials reads the amount of oxygen reaching transplanted tissue -- a critical component of a transplant's success. Existing oximeter technology is complicated to use, restricts patients' movements, and is subject to false alarms. The first human trial of the liquid bandage in women undergoing breast reconstruction after cancer found that it performed as well as a wired oximeter device, the current clinical standard. (2020-12-22)

Promising clinical data for fenofibrate's ability to prevent lung damage in COVID patients
In what has the potential to significantly change how Corona patients are being treated and the severity of the disease, research spearheaded at Jerusalem's Hebrew University gathered early clinical evidence demonstrating the efficacy of an existing drug in treating COVID-19. (2020-12-22)

Virtual kidney transplant evaluation allows patients to be evaluated from home
A virtual telehealth platform is allowing the surgery program at the Medical University of South Carolina to evaluate and wait-list patients for kidney transplantation despite reductions in direct, in-person health care visits brought about by the COVID-19 pandemic. (2020-12-21)

Study: the pandemic's impact on lung cancer
A recent study led by University of Cincinnati Cancer Center researchers shows the impact the pandemic had on lung cancer screening, which experts say could be bad for both screening programs in general and for the overall well-being of patients. The article appears on the website of the Journal of the American College of Surgeons in advance of print. (2020-12-17)

Study reports drop in lung cancer screening, rise in malignancy during COVID-19 surge
Reporting on how deferred care worsened outcomes for lung cancer patients when the COVID-19 pandemic first surged in the spring of 2020, researchers from the University of Cincinnati explained that they have identified a framework that could help people with serious health conditions keep up their appointments during the current surge. The study has been selected for the 2020 Southern Surgical Association Program. (2020-12-17)

Finding a personalized approach to treating chronic rejection after lung transplantation
By studying the roles of an inflammatory protein and antibodies in chronic rejection after lung transplantation, researchers discover possibilities for new treatments. (2020-12-17)

Antifungal drug improves key cystic fibrosis biomarkers in clinical study
A drug widely used to treat fungal infections improved key biomarkers in lung tissue cultures as well as in the noses of patients with cystic fibrosis, a clinical study by researchers at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign and the University of Iowa found. (2020-12-17)

UMD paves the way for growing human organs for transplantation with new proof-of-concept
With the number of people who suffer from organ failures and the growing need for available organs for transplant, finding a new way to provide organs and therapeutic options to transplant patients is a critical need. In a new paper, University of Maryland researchers show for the first time that newly established stem cells from pigs could provide a solution, laying the groundwork for growing transplantable human organs. (2020-12-17)

Study uncovers two phases of infection in patients with severe COVID-19 pneumonia
To analyze SARS-CoV-2 at the tissue level, scientists examined lung specimens from 24 patients who succumbed to COVID-19. The analyses revealed two phases of infection in the patients: an early phase defined by high levels of virus in the lungs, and a later phase in which the virus is no longer present, but the damage to the lungs is too severe for recovery. (2020-12-16)

Cancer: Tumor driver promoting EMT, metastasis and resistance to therapy
Publication in Nature: researchers at the Université libre de Bruxelles (ULB) identify, for the first time, the functions of FAT1, one of the most frequently mutated cancer gene drivers. They uncover that FAT1 mutations promotes invasive features, metastasis and resistance to commonly used anti-cancer drugs, and discover new therapy for FAT1 mutated cancers. (2020-12-16)

Too many donor kidneys are discarded in U.S. before transplantation
a large portion of the discarded kidneys would function acceptably if transplanted, according to a new study from a team led by researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and the Paris Translational Research Center for Organ Transplantation. (2020-12-15)

Remdesivir likely to be highly effective antiviral against SARS-CoV-2
The drug remdesivir is likely to be a highly effective antiviral against SARS-CoV-2, according to a new study by a team of UK scientists. Writing in Nature Communications, the researchers describe giving the drug to a patient with COVID-19 and a rare immune disorder, and observing a dramatic improvement in his symptoms and the disappearance of the virus. (2020-12-14)

One-year kidney allograft outcomes do not differ by hepatitis C status of donor
Study published in AJKD shows that kidney allograft outcomes one year post-transplantation in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-negative recipients do not differ by the HCV status of the donor. (2020-12-14)

The un-appeal of banana: liquid e-cigarette flavorings measurably injure lungs
UC San Diego researchers report chemicals used for flavor in e-cigarette liquid negatively affect specialized proteins that support immune system. (2020-12-14)

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