Current Lying News and Events

Current Lying News and Events, Lying News Articles.
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Simply speaking while infected can potentially spread COVID-19
COVID-19 can spread from asymptomatic but infected people through small aerosol droplets in their exhaled breath. Most studies of the flow of exhaled air have focused on coughing or sneezing; however, speaking while near one another is also risky. In Physics of Fluids, scientists used smoke and laser light to study the flow of expelled breath near and around two people conversing in various relative postures commonly found in the service industry. (2021-02-23)

When rhinos fly: Upside down the right way for transport
When it comes to saving endangered species of a certain size, conservationists often have to think outside the box. (2021-02-01)

Climate change puts hundreds of coastal airports at risk of flooding
Newcastle University scientists have found that 269 airports are at risk of coastal flooding now. A temperature rise of 2C - consistent with the Paris Agreement - would lead to 100 airports being below mean sea level and 364 airports at risk of flooding. If global mean temperature rise exceeds this then as many as 572 airports will be at risk by 2100, leading to major disruptions without appropriate adaptation. (2021-01-21)

Lack of physical exercise during COVID-19 confinement may lead to a rise in mortality
In a review article published in Frontiers of Endocrinology, Brazilian researchers estimate a reduction of 35% in levels of physical activity and a rise of 28% in sedentary behavior in the initial months of confinement imposed by the pandemic. (2021-01-19)

Discovery of new praying mantis species from the time of the dinosaurs
A McGill-led research team has identified a new species of praying mantis thanks to imprints of its fossilized wings. It lived in Labrador, in the Canadian Subarctic around 100 million years ago, during the time of the dinosaurs, in the Late Cretaceous period. The researchers believe that the fossils of the new genus and species, Labradormantis guilbaulti, helps to establish evolutionary relationships between previously known species and advances the scientific understanding of the evolution of the most 'primitive' modern praying mantises. (2021-01-19)

What happens when your brain can't tell which way is up or down?
What feels like up may actually be some other direction depending on how our brains process our orientation, according to psychology researchers at York University's Faculty of Health. In a new study published in PLoS One, researchers at York University's Centre for Vision Research found that an individual's interpretation of the direction of gravity can be altered by how their brain responds to visual information. (2021-01-07)

Charles Darwin was right about why insects are losing the ability to fly
Most insects can fly. Yet scores of species have lost that extraordinary ability, particularly on islands. (2020-12-09)

Poverty and honesty are not opposites
Does poverty cause lying? An international research team led by behavioral economist Agne Kajackaite from the WZB Berlin Social Science Center, Suparee Boonmanunt (Mahidol University, Bangkok) and Stephan Meier (Columbia Business School) examined whether poverty-stricken individuals were especially prone to acts of dishonesty. The researchers ran a field experiment with rice farmers in Thailand which incentivized cheating during a card game. They found that poverty itself did not cause individuals to act dishonestly. (2020-11-27)

Less sedentary time reduces heart failure risk for older women
The more waking hours older women spend sitting or lying down, the more likely they are to require hospitalization for heart failure. The association between sedentary hours and heart failure was present in postmenopausal women with a variety of health conditions and strikingly, even among women who were active at guideline-recommended levels. (2020-11-24)

Carbon nanocomposites are now one step closer to practical industrial
Multifunctional materials were designed to allow self-diagnostic monitoring through an inexpensive technique. These materials were created by adding the carbon nanoparticles to polymer matrices. Essentially, the use of such materials has the potential to replace sensors in weight critical systems such as aircraft structures, with the material itself being able to provide measurements. (2020-11-23)

Lie detection -- Have the experts got it wrong?
Researchers led by the University of Portsmouth carried out a critical analysis of the Model Statement lie detection technique and the results have been published today in the Journal of Investigative Psychology and Offender Profiling. There are concerns that the use of the technique is dangerous in the pursuit of criminal justice and researchers are calling for an urgent review of its practice. (2020-10-15)

High blood pressure treatment linked to less risk for drop in blood pressure upon standing
Treatment to lower blood pressure did not increase and may decrease the risk of extreme drops in blood pressure upon standing from a sitting position. These findings suggest that orthostatic hypotension, a type of low blood pressure that occurs when moving from sitting or lying down to standing, should not be a reason to stop or reduce hypertension treatment. (2020-09-10)

Monitoring sleep positions for a healthy rest
MIT researchers have developed a wireless, private way to monitor a person's sleep postures -- whether snoozing on their back, stomach, or sides -- using reflected radio signals from a small device mounted on a bedroom wall. (2020-09-10)

First treatment identified for fainting
Fainting affects one in two people during their lifetime. Those with recurrent episodes are often afraid to socialise or go to work. Today researchers report the first effective therapy. The late breaking research is presented at ESC Congress 2020. (2020-09-01)

Sea-level rise linked to higher water tables along California coast
Researchers modeled the effects of rising sea levels along the California coast. While results varied with local topography, the study indicates an increased threat to populated areas already at risk from rising water tables, and the possibility of flooding in unexpected inland areas. (2020-08-21)

How stars form in the smallest galaxies
The question of how small, dwarf galaxies have sustained the formation of new stars over the course of the Universe has long confounded the world's astronomers. An international research team led by Lund University in Sweden has found that dormant small galaxies can slowly accumulate gas over many billions of years. When this gas suddenly collapses under its own weight, new stars are able to arise. (2020-08-12)

Machine learning methods provide new insights into organic-inorganic interfaces
Simulations at Graz University of Technology refute earlier theories on long-range charge transfer between organic and inorganic materials. (2020-08-04)

Mysterious Australian Night Parrots may not see in the dead of night
Australia's most elusive bird, the Night Parrot, may not be much better at seeing in the dark than other parrots active during the day. An international study, co-led by Flinders University's Dr Vera Weisbecker, has revealed the critically endangered parrot's visual system is not as well-adapted to life in the dark as would be expected for a nocturnal bird, raising concerns it might be adversely impacted by fencing in the Australian outback. (2020-06-09)

DNA increases our understanding of contact between Stone Age cultures
What kind of interactions did the various Stone Age cultures have with one another? In a new interdisciplinary study, researchers have combined archaeological and genetic information to better understand Battle Axe cultural influences discovered in graves of the Pitted Ware culture. The findings are published in the American Journal of Physical Anthropology. (2020-06-05)

A new horizon for vibrational circular dichroism spectroscopy
(1) The development of solid state and time-step VCD methods opened a new horizon to reveal the mechanism of chirality amplification from microscopic to supramolecular scales. (2) The authors were selected as PCCP Emerging Investigators of the Royal Society of Chemistry. (2020-05-28)

MSU scientists solve half-century-old magnesium dimer mystery
Magnesium dimer (Mg2) is a fragile molecule consisting of two weakly interacting atoms held together by the laws of quantum mechanics. It has recently emerged as a potential probe for understanding fundamental phenomena at the intersection of chemistry and ultracold physics, but its use has been thwarted by a half-century-old enigma -- five high-lying vibrational states that hold the key to understanding how the magnesium atoms interact but have eluded detection for 50 years. (2020-05-22)

Climate change will turn coastal Antarctica green, say scientists
Scientists have created the first ever large-scale map of microscopic algae as they bloomed across the surface of snow along the Antarctic Peninsula coast. Results indicate that this 'green snow' is likely to spread as global temperatures increase. (2020-05-20)

The life and death of one of America's most mysterious trees
A symbol of life, ancient sundial or just firewood? Tree-ring scientists trace the origin of a tree log unearthed almost a century ago. (2020-03-17)

Consumers value products more on sunny and snowy days but not when it rains
Weather is an ever-present force in consumers' daily lives, yet there is little marketing research on how it affects consumers and businesses. A new UBC Sauder School of Business study reveals that sunny and snowy conditions trigger consumers to mentally visualize using products associated with the respective weather, which leads to consumers placing a higher value on them. Researchers also found the link between weather and higher product valuation only works for products that are related to being outside. (2020-02-27)

Baldness gene discovery reveals origin of hairy alpine plants
Scientists have solved a puzzle that has long baffled botanists -- why some plants on high mountainsides are hairy while their low-lying cousins are bald. (2020-02-27)

Sensory perception is not superficial brain work
How does the brain decide which of the senses it will focus attention on when two interact? For the first time, scientists measured the sensory signals at different depths in the cortex. (2020-02-10)

People may lie to appear honest
People may lie to appear honest if events that turned out in their favor seem too good to be true, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association. (2020-01-30)

Lame sheep adjust their behavior to cope with their condition, says a new study
Using novel sensing technology, experts from the University of Nottingham have found that lame sheep adjust how they carry out certain actives, such as walking, standing or laying down, rather than simply reducing the amount they do. (2020-01-15)

Men think they're better liars
Men are twice as likely as women to consider themselves to be good at lying and at getting away with it, new research has found. (2019-12-20)

UNH researchers find climate change and turf seaweed causing 'patchy' seascape
Researchers at the University of New Hampshire find environmental developments caused by climate change are contributing to the transformation of the seafloor to a lower, more patchy seascape dominated by shrub-like seaweed which could impact species habitats and the structure of the food web. (2019-11-14)

Ground penetrating radar reveals why ancient Cambodian capital was moved to Angkor
The largest water management feature in Khmer history was built in the 10th century as part of a short-lived ancient capital in northern Cambodia to store water but the system failed in its first year of operation, possibly leading to the return of the capital to Angkor. (2019-10-31)

World first study with drone cameras now separates living from the dead
Autonomous drone cameras have been trialled for several years to detect signs of life in disaster zones. Now, in a world first study, researchers from Adelaide and Iraq have taken this a step further. (2019-10-22)

Children told lies by parents subsequently lie more as adults, face adjustment difficulty
'If you don't behave, I'll call the police,' is a lie that parents might use to get their young children to behave. Parents' lies elicit compliance in the short term, but a new psychology study led by Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) suggests that they are associated with detrimental effects when the child becomes an adult. (2019-10-02)

WVU study reveals falsification issues in higher education hiring processes
When concerns are expressed about distrust in science, they often focus on whether the public trusts research findings. A new study from West Virginia University, however, explores a different dimension of trust. (2019-09-30)

'Smart shirt' can accurately measure breathing and could be used to monitor lung disease
A smart shirt that measures lung function by sensing movements in the chest and abdomen has proved to be accurate when compared to traditional testing equipment, according to research presented at the European Respiratory Society International Congress. (2019-09-29)

More time spent standing helps combat effects of sedentary lifestyle
A study conducted by scientists from the University of Granada and published in the journal PLOS ONE recommends that people spend more time standing, to increase energy expenditure and thus avoid the negative health problems associated with a sedentary li (2019-09-06)

Heating pads may lower blood pressure in people with high blood pressure when lying down
In people with supine hypertension due to autonomic failure, a condition that increases blood pressure when lying down, overnight heat therapy significantly decreased systolic blood pressure compared to a placebo. Heat therapy may be an innovative, non-pharmacologic approach to treat the overnight high blood pressure in these patients. (2019-09-06)

New test to snare those lying about a person's identity
A new test developed by the University of Stirling could help police to determine when criminals or witnesses are lying about their knowledge of a person's identity. (2019-08-07)

How is urban green space associated with mental health?
This observational study looked at how green space is associated with mental health. Some research has suggested living near more green space may be associated with benefits. This analysis included nearly 47,000 city-dwelling adults in Australia and examined how living near different kinds of green space (including tree canopy, grass and low-lying vegetation) may be associated with risk of psychological distress, self-reported physician-diagnosed depression or anxiety, and fair to poor self-reported general health. (2019-07-26)

It's dog eat dog on the canine social ladder
Climbing the social ladder is a ruff business for dogs, new research shows. (2019-07-02)

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