Current Lymph Nodes News and Events

Current Lymph Nodes News and Events, Lymph Nodes News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
Dynamics of nanoparticles using a new isolated lymphatic vessel lumen perfusion system
Nanoparticles introduced into the body enter the lymphatic vessels. A research group led by Shinshu University Graduate School of Medicine has developed a new isolated lymphatic vessel lumen perfusion system that can move carbon nanotubes and other nanoparticles into surgically removed lymphatic vessels. The group succeeded in developing a novel experimental system to evaluate how nanoparticles move in lymphatic vessels and how they affect the physiological movement of lymphatic vessels. (2021-02-19)

Surface testing for SARS-CoV2 in hematology/oncology settings reveals negligible detection
Researchers from Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, the state's only National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center, evaluated the frequency of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, on various environmental surfaces in outpatient and inpatient hematology/oncology settings located within Rutgers Cancer Institute and Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital, an RWJBarnabas Health facility. The study revealed extremely low detection of SARS-CoV-2 on environmental surfaces across multiple outpatient and inpatient oncology areas, including an active COVID-19 floor. (2021-02-18)

Phase I clinical trial shows promise of adipose-derived stem cells in treating lymphedema
Results of a phase I clinical trial released in STEM CELLS Translational Medicine shows there is a strong possibility that stem cells may alleviate lymphedema, a chronic debilitating condition affecting up to one in three women treated for breast cancer. (2021-02-17)

Model helps predict which patients will benefit most from PSMA PET scan
A new study led by researchers at the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center helps identify which patients with prostate cancer will benefit most from the use of prostate-specific membrane antigen PET imaging, PSMA PET, a novel imaging technique that recently was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. (2021-02-16)

New research studies 'domino effects' and synchrony in brain activity
Scientists have made a significant breakthrough in the quest to understand the intricate processes that occur in the brain during seizures that are the key symptom of epilepsy. (2021-02-05)

How blood and lymph vessels remain separated after development
Researchers in Japan have clarified the mechanism by which blood and lymphatic vessels remain separated after development. The characteristics and structures of these two vessel types are very similar, and how they maintain separation has remained unexplained for many years. In this study, researchers found that the molecule Folliculin (FLCN) in vascular endothelial cells acts as a gatekeeper to maintain separation between the two. (2021-02-04)

Spanish scientists identify a mechanism through which dendritic cells improve their antiviral and immunotherapy strategies
Researchers at the Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares (CNIC) have discovered that dendritic cells, which initiate specific immune responses, can reprogram their genes to improve their immune response (2021-02-03)

Combining PD-1inhibitor with VEGF inhibitor in chemotherapy of cholangiocarcinoma patient
Cholangiocarcinoma is the second most frequent liver cancer. Many patients miss the opportunity of having a surgery performed on them and its control has always been considered difficult. Here, doctors from The Affiliated Brain Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University (Guangzhou Huiai Hospital), Guangzhou, China, present a case of stage 4 cholangiocarcinoma. (2021-02-02)

Modeling the brain during pain processing
Through new research published in EPJ B, researchers show that inhibitory interneurons, which prevent chemical messages from passing between different regions of the brain, make up 20% of the circuitry in the brain required for pain processing. The discovery represents a significant advance in researchers' understanding of how our bodies and brains respond to pain. (2021-02-02)

Singles or pairs in cancer cells
An important receptor on the surface of cancer and immune cells prefers to remain noncommittal; sometimes it is present as a single, sometimes as a pair. This was first shown by an MDC team in the journal PNAS, and will decisively advance the development of new medications. (2021-01-29)

Radiation Oncology trials using PET with FDG uptake among NSCLC patients
Two radiation oncology trials presented at the IALSC World Conference on Lung Cancer Singapore highlight how some researchers are exploring use of higher radiation boost doses to only PET-positive regions in locally-advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A previous large RTOG phase III trial revealed that the unform delivery of a high dose to the entire tumor led to poorer survival. (2021-01-29)

How does the immune system keep tabs on the brain?
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that immune cells stationed in the meninges, the tissue that covers the brain and spinal cord, monitor the brain and initiate an immune response if they detect a problem. (2021-01-27)

Domino effects and synchrony in seizure initiation
In a brain with a neurological disorder like epilepsy, synchronization between groups of neurons can grow to a dangerous extent when a collection of brain cells begins to emit excess electricity. Researchers used a mathematical model to explore the interplay between neurons that leads to these transitions in synchronization during the onset of seizures. (2021-01-25)

To find the right network model, compare all possible histories
Scientists rarely have the historical data they need to see exactly how nodes in a network became connected. But a new paper in Physical Review Letters offers hope for reconstructing the missing information, using a new method to evaluate the rules that generate network models. (2021-01-25)

Rhesus macaques develop promising immune response to SARS-CoV-2
In a promising result for the success of vaccines against COVID-19, rhesus macaque monkeys infected with the human coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 developed protective immune responses that might be reproduced with a vaccine. (2021-01-22)

Getting shapes into numbers
A mathematical framework enables accurate characterization of shapes (2021-01-20)

Discovery of a new approach to inhibiting a highly treatment-refractory liver cancer
Blocking placental growth factor (PlGF), a member of the vascular endothelial growth factor family, inhibits the progression of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) and enhances the efficacy of chemotherapy in mouse models. This novel approach to targeting the connective tissue microenvironment of ICC, a rare but notoriously treatment-resistant form of liver cancer, could pave the way for combination therapies, including chemotherapy and immune checkpoint blockade. (2021-01-12)

Hunters and busybodies: Researchers use Wikipedia to measure different types of curiosity
In the past, research on curiosity has mostly tried to quantify it, rather than to understand the different ways it can be expressed. Now, a new study led by researchers at Penn and American University uses Wikipedia browsing as a method for describing curiosity styles. Using a branch of mathematics known as graph theory, their analysis of curiosity opens doors for using it as a tool to improve learning and life satisfaction. (2021-01-12)

Are two phases of quarantine better than one?
The importance of strict quarantine has been widely debated during the COVID-19 epidemic. The public debate on lockdown strategy raises the question of whether it is better to have a two-phase lockdown (a strict lockdown followed by a relaxation of restrictions) or a single, softer quarantine policy (the Swedish model). (2020-12-23)

Moffitt researchers discover potential new drug target to treat cutaneous T cell lymphoma
In order to improve their understanding of how CTCL develops in hopes of developing new therapies, a team of Moffitt scientists conducted a series of studies. In an article published in The Journal of Clinical Investigation, they demonstrate that decreased expression of the protein SATB1 contributes to CTCL development and that drugs that cause SATB1 to become re-expressed may be potential treatment options for this disease. (2020-12-21)

New topological properties found in "old" material of Cobalt disulfide
Researchers working with the Schoop Lab discovered the presence of Weyl nodes in bulk CoS2 that allow them to make predictions about its surface properties. The material hosts Weyl-fermions and Fermi-arc surface states within its band structure, which may enable it to serve as a platform for exotic phenomena. (2020-12-18)

Some postmenopausal women with common breast cancer may forgo chemotherapy
Postmenopausal women with a common form of breast cancer may safely skip chemotherapy, according to study results from SWOG Cancer Research Network, funded by the National Cancer Institute, to be released at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium. (2020-12-09)

High-risk, HR+, HER2-, early-stage BC patients continue to benefit from abemaciclib
Extended follow-up data from the phase III monarchE trial showed that adding the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor abemaciclib (Verzenio) to standard adjuvant endocrine therapy continued to improve invasive disease-free survival (IDFS) among patients with high-risk, node-positive, early-stage, HR-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer, according to data presented at the 2020 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium. (2020-12-09)

Postmenopausal women with early-stage BC/low recurrence score could skip adjuvant chemo
After a median follow-up of 5.1 years, among women with lymph node-positive early-stage breast cancer and a recurrence score of 25 or lower who received adjuvant endocrine therapy with or without chemotherapy, postmenopausal patients had no added benefit from chemotherapy, while premenopausal patients who received chemotherapy had improved invasive disease-free survival (IDFS) and an early indication of improved overall survival (OS), according to data from the SWOG S1007 RxPONDER clinical trial. (2020-12-09)

HIV-like virus edited out of primate genome
Taking a major step forward in HIV research, scientists at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University have successfully edited SIV - a virus closely related to HIV, the cause of AIDS - from the genomes of non-human primates. The breakthrough brings Temple researchers and their collaborators closer than ever to developing a cure for human HIV infection. (2020-11-30)

Immune strategy based on limited information in the network
For cases of global pandemics such as e.g., the current COVID-19, it is impossible to know the full interactions of all individuals and immunize the most centrals. The authors develop a framework for understanding and carrying out efficient immunization (or efficient attack) with limited knowledge. Their findings highlight that an effective way to limit spreading is obtaining information on a few (n approximately 10) individuals and targeting (testing or quarantine) the most central of these. (2020-11-24)

Minuscule migrations
Cells move constantly throughout our bodies, performing myriad operations critical to tissue development, immune responses and general wellbeing. This bustle is guided by chemical cues long studied by scientists interested in cellular migration. (2020-11-20)

Researchers peer inside deadly pathogen's burglary kit
The bacterium that causes the tick-borne disease tularemia is a lean, mean infecting machine. It carries a relatively small genome, and a unique set of infectious tools, including a collection of chromosomal genes called 'the pathogenicity island.' Structural insights from Cryo-EM microscopy, appearing Nov. 19 in Molecular Cell, point to a way in which the bacterium's unique infectious machinery might be blocked. (2020-11-19)

Does the human brain resemble the Universe?
An astrophysicist of the University of Bologna and a neurosurgeon of the University of Verona compared the network of neuronal cells in the human brain with the cosmic network of galaxies... and surprising similarities emerged (2020-11-16)

New source of lymphatic system leak discovered in children with rare open heart surgery complication
Interventional radiologists with Nemours Children's Health System have identified a new source of abnormal lymphatic flow between the liver and the lungs that may be responsible for some cases of plastic bronchitis. Plastic bronchitis is a rare but serious late complication in patients with congenital heart disease who had Fontan surgery. A report detailing the discovery of this fluid leak, and successful treatment of two cases was published in European Heart Journal. (2020-11-11)

Penn researchers present findings on cardiac risks for cancer patients
Physician-researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania will present findings about cardiac care for cancer patients and survivors at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2020. (2020-11-10)

Smart devices to schedule electricity use may prevent blackouts
Power plants generate electricity and send it into power lines that distribute energy to nodes where it can be used. But if the electricity load is more than the system's capacity, transmission can fail, leading to a cascade of failures throughout the electric grid. In the journal Chaos, researchers show demand side control may be an effective solution to stabilizing the reliability of power grids that use a mix of energy generation sources. (2020-11-10)

A viable vaccine for tough tumors
While immunotherapies work well for some cancers, others are immune-resistant and condemn patients to the severe side effects of long-term chemo treatment. A new cancer vaccine successfully treated immune-resistant breast cancer in mice, 100% of which survived a second injection of cancer cells, indicating long-term immunity with no side effects. (2020-11-10)

New multiscale view of the human brain
Researchers from University of Barcelona study how multilayers that form the human brain interact at different resolutions (2020-11-04)

Building a quantum network one node at a time
University of Rochester and Cornell University researchers create 'optically active spin arrays' within a device that could serve as a node for exchanging photons with distant locations. (2020-11-04)

Oncotarget: Heterogeneity of CEACAM5 in breast cancer
Oncotarget recently published ''Heterogeneity of CEACAM5 in breast cancer'' which reported that Here, we examined a repository of 110 cryopreserved primary breast carcinomas by immunohistochemistry to assess the distribution of CEACAM5 in tumor subtypes. (2020-11-03)

How the immune system remembers viruses
For a person to acquire immunity to a disease, T cells must develop into memory cells after contact with the pathogen. Until now, the number of cells that do this was believed to depend above all on the magnitude of the initial immune response. A team of researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now called this into question. (2020-11-02)

Skilled surgeons boost colon cancer survival by 70%
Patients of more technically skilled surgeons, as assessed by review of operative video, have better long-term survival after surgery for the treatment of colon cancer, reports a new study. Patients whose surgery was performed by a highly skilled surgeon had a 70 percent lower risk of dying over five years compared to patients with a lower skilled surgeon. (2020-10-30)

How allergens trigger itching: Finding points to new targets for allergy drug development
A key step in the immune system's response to allergens has been uncovered by researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital. They have shown that a neuropeptide called Substance P is released by certain neurons in the skin when they detect allergens, and that this substance is essential in the development of allergen-induced immune responses. This research could lead to the development of new and better methods to treat and prevent allergies. (2020-10-29)

18F-Fluciclovine PET/MRI for prostate cancer staging, androgen deprivation evaluation
According to an open-access article in ARRS' American Journal of Roentgenology, fluorine-18-labeled fluciclovine PET/MRI demonstrated utility in the initial staging of high-risk prostate cancer, as well as for evaluating the response to androgen deprivation therapy. Given the FDA approval and widespread availability of 18F-fluciclovine, the findings could have impact in the immediate future in guiding initial management of patients with prostate cancer. (2020-10-27)

Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.