Current Lynch Syndrome News and Events

Current Lynch Syndrome News and Events, Lynch Syndrome News Articles.
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How reducing body temperature could help a tenth of all ICU patients
ROCKVILLE, MD - A tenth of all intensive care unit patients worldwide, and many critical patients with COVID-19, have acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). (2021-02-23)

How a gene called HAND2 may impact the timing of labor
Using new and existing datasets the team studied genes that were active in the uterine linings of different animals while pregnant or carrying eggs. Scientists also investigated the changing levels of HAND2 during gestation. (2021-02-22)

CHOP experts describe types of rashes associated with MIS-C
In a study published in Open Forum Infectious Diseases, researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) describe the array of rashes seen in MIS-C patients at their hospital through late July 2020, providing photos and information that could help doctors diagnose future cases. (2021-02-22)

International study finds increased COVID-19 mortality among adults with Down syndrome
A new study by an international team of researchers found that adults with Down syndrome are more likely to die from COVID-19 than the general population, supporting the need to prioritize vaccinating people with the genetic disorder. (2021-02-22)

Youth exposed to natural disasters report low post-traumatic stress
A study of over 1,700 U.S. young people exposed to four major hurricanes found that just a few of them reported chronic stress, and the trajectories among most youth reflected recovery or low-decreasing post-traumatic stress (PTS) symptoms, according to recently published research. The inquiry combined data from four studies of youths ages six to 16 who attended schools near the respective destructive paths of Hurricanes Andrew (1992), Charley (2004), Ike (2005) and Katrina (2008). (2021-02-17)

Study demonstrates the reasons to screen children with cancer for inherited cancer genes
Experts at MSK Kids, the pediatric oncology program at MSK, have found that inherited cancer genes are more common than expected in children with cancer. (2021-02-16)

Hope for children with bow hunter syndrome
DALLAS - Feb. 11, 2021 - Fusing the neck's top two vertebrae can prevent repeat strokes in children with bow hunter syndrome, a rare condition that affects a handful of U.S. pediatric patients each year, UT Southwestern researchers suggest in a recent study. The finding, published online in Child's Nervous System, offers a new way to treat these children and protect them from potentially lifelong neurological consequences. (2021-02-11)

Early study points to potential therapeutic avenue for a pair of rare pediatric diseases
Scientists have devised a new approach for detecting and potentially heading off the effects of two rare pediatric diseases before birth. The study, performed in mouse models of the diseases and published today in Cell Reports, represents an important step toward much-needed early interventions for Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome and Silver-Russell syndrome. (2021-02-09)

The genetic susceptibility of people with Down's syndrome to COVID-19
A study reveals the genetic factors that may expose or protect people with Down syndrome from SARS-CoV-2. TMPRSS2, a gene that codes for an enzyme critical for aiding the entry of SARS-CoV-2 in human cells, had 60% higher levels of expression in Down syndrome. The researchers also found higher expression levels for CXCL10, a gene that can trigger cytokine storms. The authors call to vaccinate people with Down syndrome against COVID-19 as a priority. (2021-02-08)

If healthy people are purposefully infected with COVID-19 for the sake of science, they should be paid
Multidisciplinary team of international experts suggests participants should receive a ''substantial'' amount, be paid ethically. (2021-02-05)

Deadly white-nose syndrome changed genes in surviving bats
Scientists have found genetic differences between bats killed by white-nose syndrome and bats that survived, suggesting that survivors rapidly evolve to resist the fungal disease, according to a Rutgers-led study with big implications for deciding how to safeguard bat populations. (2021-02-04)

How elephants evolved to become big and cancer-resistant
In this new study, 'We explored how elephants and their living and extinct relatives evolved to be cancer-resistant,' says University at Buffalo biologist Vincent Lynch. He adds, regarding the findings, 'Elephants have lots and lots and lots of extra copies of tumor suppressor genes, and they all contribute probably a little bit to cancer resistance.' (2021-02-04)

Newly discovered trait helps plants grow deeper roots in dry, compacted soils
A previously unknown root trait allows some cereal plants to grow deeper roots capable of punching through dry, hard, compacted soils, according to Penn State researchers, who suggest that harnessing the inherited characteristic could lead to crops better able to deal with a changing climate. (2021-02-01)

New technique identifies important mutations behind Lynch Syndrome
A Michigan Medicine team describes a method for screening so-called genetic variants of uncertain significance in the hopes of identifying those mutations that could cause cancer. (2021-01-29)

First hybrid gene therapy shows early promise in treating long QT syndrome
In a new study published in Circulation, Mayo Clinic researchers provide the first preclinical, proof-of-concept study for hybrid gene therapy in long QT syndrome, a potentially lethal heart rhythm condition. (2021-01-28)

Rare genetic syndrome identified, caused by mutations in gene SATB1
Variations in the gene SATB1 have been shown to cause a rare genetic syndrome. Different variations across the gene lead to varied effects on the cell, leading to a difference in the severity of neurodevelopmental disorders. Discovery of this genetic syndrome is hoped to provide information to families and individuals affected by SATB1-syndrome. (2021-01-28)

Ohio State-led support program suggests a reduction in preterm birth and infant mortality
New research suggests a unique program called Moms2B at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center shows a reduction in adverse pregnancy outcomes in communities disproportionately affected by these public health issues. (2021-01-19)

Altering mealtimes could prevent development of Type 2 diabetes
An innovative new study is set to examine if changing our mealtimes to earlier or later in the day could reduce the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. (2021-01-15)

Approximately half of AD dementia cases are mild, one-fifth are severe
What percent of patients with Alzheimer's Disease (AD) currently have severe dementia? Do more people have mild disease? Or are the majority suffering with moderate dementia? A new study using data from the Framingham Heart Study (FHS) sheds light on these trends. (2021-01-13)

Pillar-like molecules as biosensors for metabolites
Researchers at Kanazawa University report in Communications Chemistry that a molecule known as pillar[6]arene can form a host-guest compound with a cancer-associated metabolite. The phenomenon can be used to efficiently detect the metabolite in crude biological samples, which is important for preventing and treating metabolic syndrome and associated pathologies. (2021-01-11)

Study: New insights on the role of the MLL4 gene in Kabuki syndrome
Research suggests that MLL4 controls the production of neurons that secrete growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) in a part of the brain called the hypothalamus. (2021-01-11)

Bats with white-nose syndrome prefer suboptimal habitats despite the consequences
Bats are mistakenly preferring sites where fungal growth is high and therefore their survival is low. (2021-01-08)

A subtle change in the DNA may predispose to polyneuropathy after gut infection
Researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) identified a novel genetic variant associated with Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). By analyzing the DNA sequence of patients with the disease, the researchers identified two novel variants of the ganglioside-binding protein Siglec-10 accumulated in the patients. They found that one of these variants impairs the function of the protein, predisposing carriers to the development of GBS. This study improves our understanding of the pathophysiology of GBS. (2021-01-07)

A brain mechanism underlying 'vision' in the blind is revealed
Researchers observed slow spontaneous fluctuations in the brain's visual centers that preceded visual hallucinations in blind people. (2021-01-07)

New research finds ginger counters certain autoimmune diseases in mice
The main bioactive compound of ginger root lowers autoantibody production and helps halt disease progression in mice with antiphospholipid syndrome and lupus. (2021-01-06)

Some English bulldogs thought to have cancer may have newly identified syndrome
Some English bulldogs diagnosed with a common cancer may instead have a newly described, non-cancerous syndrome called polyclonal B?cell lymphocytosis. The discovery was made by Morris Animal Foundation-funded researchers at Colorado State University during a study to better understand B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (BCLL). The team published their findings in the Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine. (2021-01-05)

Metabolic syndrome 'interacts' with COVID-19
Announcing a new publication for BIO Integration journal. In this review article the authors Zeling Guo, Shanping Jiang, Zilun Li and Sifan Chen from Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, China review how metabolic syndrome 'interacts' with COVID-19. (2020-12-23)

Scientists pinpoint molecular cause for severe disorder in children
A team of scientists from the University of Ottawa have opened a window into the cause of a rare genetic disorder that causes mortality in young children. (2020-12-22)

Beyond changing DNA itself, mutagens also cause errors in gene transcription
The discovery that toxic stressors can cause errors in gene transcription opens new avenues of research on diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's and sheds light on the potential role of the ''transcriptome'' in aging. (2020-12-21)

The far-reaching effects of mutagens on human health
Mutagenic threats to a cell's subtle machinery may be far more widespread than previously appreciated. In a new study, Michael Lynch and his colleagues demonstrate that DNA mutation itself may represent only a fraction the health-related havoc caused by mutagens. The study highlights the ability of mutagenic compounds to also affect the process of transcription, during which a DNA sequence is converted (or transcribed) to mRNA, an intermediary stage preceding translation into protein. (2020-12-21)

Prenatal testing has halved the number of babies born with Down syndrome in Europe
For the first time, a study has aggregated data on the number of babies born with Down syndrome in each European country. Researchers estimate the number of people with Down syndrome alive each year between 1950 and 2015. It is critical to have accurate estimates of the prevalence of Down syndrome so each country can evaluate the impact of prenatal testing on its population and to allocate appropriate resources to its citizens with Down syndrome. (2020-12-18)

New in the Hastings Center Report, November-December 2020
Appealing to patient autonomy, bioethicists argue for making oral contraceptives, HIV-prevention medicines, statins, and many other prescription drugs available over the counter. (2020-12-16)

Water may be an effective treatment for metabolic syndrome
Researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have discovered that fructose stimulates the release of vasopressin, a hormone linked to obesity and diabetes. They also found that water can suppress the hormone and alleviate these conditions in mice. (2020-12-15)

How poor oral hygiene may result in metabolic syndrome
Researchers from TMDU identified a novel mechanism by which periodontal disease may cause metabolic syndrome. By studying patients with metabolic syndrome, the researchers demonstrated high antibody titers against Porphyromonas gingivalis, the bacterium causing periodontal disease. In a mouse model, the researchers then showed that infection with this bacterium causes systemic insulin resistance and metabolic dysfunction in skeletal muscle by altering the gut microbiome. This study shows the effect periodontal disease can have on the entire body. (2020-12-08)

Rutgers reports first instance of COVID-19 triggering recurrent Guillain-Barré Syndrome
Researchers at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School have reported the first instance of COVID-19 triggering a recurrence of Guillain-Barré Syndrome - a rare disorder where the body's immune system attacks nerves and can lead to respiratory failure and death. (2020-12-08)

The gut microbiome in polycystic ovary syndrome and its association with metabolic traits
University of Tartu researchers and their collaborators from Finland and Spain investigated the relationship between the gut microbiome and polycystic ovary syndrome. Their study revealed that women with polycystic ovary syndrome in their late reproductive years have significant microbial changes in gut-related to their metabolic health. (2020-12-08)

Gestational age linked to ADHD in children with Down syndrome
A new study by the UC Davis MIND Institute finds a connection between gestational age and ADHD in children with Down syndrome. An earlier gestational age is linked to higher ADHD symptoms later in childhood. (2020-12-04)

New childhood dementia insight
Is the eye a window to the brain in Sanfilippo syndrome, an untreatable form of childhood-onset dementia, Australian researchers ask in a new publication. The findings of the NHMRC-funded project, just published in international journal Acta Neuropathologica Communications, highlight the potential for using widely available retinal imaging techniques to learn more about brain disease and monitor treatment efficacy. (2020-12-01)

How thyroid function affects stress-related heart problems
Chest pain, shortness of breath, heart flutter and palpitations: these symptoms are not only characteristic of a heart attack, but can also be caused by another, as yet little researched condition. So-called Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is a rare but life-threatening disease of the heart that can occur during extreme stress events. Heart and hormone research teams in Bochum and Mannheim have now shown that there is apparently a strong link between the occurrence of Takotsubo syndrome and impaired thyroid function in patients. (2020-12-01)

Breakthrough in studying the enzyme that ultimately produces fish odour syndrome
Fish odour syndrome (trimethylaminuria) is a debilitating disease, in which the liver cannot break down the smelly chemical trimethylamine which is produced by enzymes from bacteria residing in the gut leaving people with a fish like odour. Researchers from the University of Warwick are paving the way to prevent the syndrome after a breakthrough in studying the enzyme in the gut which produces trimethylamine. (2020-11-23)

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