Current MRI News and Events

Current MRI News and Events, MRI News Articles.
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Impact of patient-reported symptom information on lumbar spine MRI Interpretation
According to an open-access article in ARRS' American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), in lumbar spine MRI, presumptive pain generators diagnosed using symptom information from brief electronic questionnaires showed almost perfect agreement with pain generators diagnosed using symptom information from direct patient interviews. (2021-01-25)

MRI helps unravel the mysteries of sleep
Scientists at EPFL and the Universities of Geneva, Cape Town and Bochum have joined forces to investigate brain activity during sleep with the help of MRI scans. It turns out our brains are much more active than we thought. (2021-01-22)

RUDN University neurosurgeon created a method to collect mental activity data of software developers
A neurosurgeon from RUDN University studied the mental activity of developers at work. In his novel method, he combined mobile EEG devices and software that analyzes neurophysiological data. (2021-01-21)

Eye tests predict Parkinson's-linked cognitive decline 18 months ahead
Simple vision tests can predict which people with Parkinson's disease will develop cognitive impairment and possible dementia 18 months later, according to a new study by UCL researchers. In a related study, the researchers also found that structural and functional connections of brain regions become decoupled throughout the entire brain in people with Parkinson's disease, particularly among people with vision problems. (2021-01-19)

Obese, snoring mini pigs show how air flows through the throat during sleep apnea
A study appearing January 19 in the journal Heliyon found that obese Yucatan mini pigs have naturally occurring sleep apnea and that MRI scans taken while they're in sedated sleep can be used to gain new insights into what happens in the airways during sleep apnea episodes via computational flow dynamic (CFD) analysis. (2021-01-19)

New suspicious lesions on breast MRI in neoadjuvant therapy
According to ARRS' American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), new suspicious findings occurred in 5.5% of breast MRI examinations performed to monitor response to neoadjuvant therapy; none of these new lesions were malignant. (2021-01-14)

Cardiac MRI shows lower degrees of myocarditis in athletes recovered from COVID-19
In a letter published in the December issue of the American Heart Association's medical journal Circulation a group of researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) dispute the most recent findings of the incidence of myocarditis in athletes with a history of COVID-19. (2021-01-08)

MRI frequently underestimates tumor size in prostate cancer
Improving imaging processes will lead to more successful treatments and help reduce morbidity in men with the disease. (2021-01-07)

Controlling the nanoscale structure of membranes is key for clean water, researchers find
A desalination membrane acts as a filter for salty water: push the water through the membrane, get clean water suitable for agriculture, energy production and even drinking. The process seems simple enough, but it contains complex intricacies that have baffled scientists for decades -- until now. Researchers from Penn State, The University of Texas at Austin, Iowa State University, Dow Chemical Company and DuPont Water Solutions published a key finding in understanding how membranes actually filter minerals from water, online today (Dec. 31) in Science. (2020-12-31)

Imaging of ballistic wounds, bullet composition and implications for MRI safety
According to an article in ARRS' American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), because patients with ballistic embedded fragments are frequently denied MRI (due to indeterminate bullet composition sans shell casings), radiography and CT can be used to identify nonferromagnetic projectiles that are safe for MRI. (2020-12-29)

Neurology patients faced with rising out-of-pocket costs for tests, office visits
Just like with drug costs, the amount of money people pay out-of-pocket for diagnostic tests and office visits for neurologic conditions has risen over 15 years, according to a new study published in the December 23, 2020, online issue of issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2020-12-23)

Machine intelligence accelerates research into mapping brains
Scientists in Japan's brain science project have used machine intelligence to improve the accuracy and reliability of a powerful brain-mapping technique, a new study reports. Their development, published on December 18th in Scientific Reports, gives researchers more confidence in using the technique to untangle the human brain's wiring and to better understand the changes in this wiring that accompany neurological or mental disorders such as Parkinson's or Alzheimer's disease. (2020-12-18)

Connections determine everything
A team of scientists, with the first author from the HSE University, were investigating which factors are the most important for the upper limb motor recovery after a stroke. The study is published in Stroke, the world's leading journal for cerebrovascular pathology. (2020-12-16)

Novel MRI contrast agent sidesteps toxic effects of current products
Researchers are developing an alternative MRI contrast agent based on manganese, an essential element in human nutrition, that is easily processed and eliminated by the body. Manganese has magnetic properties similar to those of gadolinium, but without gadolinium's toxicity. (2020-12-15)

Testing memory over four weeks could predict Alzheimer's disease risk
New research suggests testing people's memory over four weeks could identify who is at higher risk of developing Alzheimer's disease before it has developed. Importantly, the trial found testing people's ability to retain memories for longer time periods could predict this more accurately than classic memory tests, which test memory over half an hour. (2020-12-10)

Computational method provides faster high-resolution mass spectrometry imaging
Researchers at the Beckman Institute have developed a computational strategy that enables faster chemical and spatial characterization of tissues. (2020-12-10)

PET/MRI, CT metrics assess pathologic response of pancreas cancer to neoadjuvant therapy
According to an open-access Editor's Choice article in ARRS' American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), post-neoadjuvant therapy (NAT) changes in metabolic metrics from PET/MRI and morphologic metrics from CT were associated with pathologic response and overall survival in patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA). (2020-12-09)

One for all
AI-based evaluation of medical imaging data usually requires a specially developed algorithm for each task. Scientists from the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) have now presented a new method for configuring self-learning algorithms for a large number of different imaging datasets - without the need for specialist knowledge or very significant computing power. (2020-12-07)

Post-COVID pain or weakness? Request an ultrasound or MRI
A new Northwestern Medicine study shows how advanced imaging technology can pinpoint what may have caused patients' nerve damage and help determine the best course of treatment. (2020-12-01)

High blood pressure in midlife is linked to increased brain damage in later life
Higher than normal blood pressure is linked to more extensive brain damage in the elderly, according to a new study published today in the European Heart Journal. In particular, the study found that there was a strong association between diastolic blood pressure (the blood pressure between heart beats) before the age of 50 and brain damage in later life, even if the diastolic blood pressure was within what is normally considered to be a healthy range. (2020-11-25)

Researchers develop low-cost, portable brain imaging scanner
Investigators have developed and tested a low-cost, compact, portable and low-power ''head only'' MRI scanner for brain tests. The scanner could allow for bedside brain imaging for patients or scanning in remote locations. (2020-11-24)

Newfound ability to change baby brain activity could lead to rehabilitation for injured brains
Researchers from King's College London have identified the brain activity for the first time in a newborn baby when they are learning an association between different types of sensory experiences. Using advanced MRI scanning techniques and robotics, the researchers found that a baby's brain activity can be changed through these associations, shedding new light on the possibility of rehabilitating babies with injured brains and promoting the development of life-long skills such as speech, language and movement. (2020-11-23)

Additional heart imaging valuable for women with unexplained heart attacks
Combining diagnostic imaging methods can detect the underlying cause of heart attack in women who did not have blocked arteries. This international, diagnostic, prospective, observational study suggested that additional heart imaging is feasible and has the potential to guide medical therapy to prevent subsequent heart attacks. (2020-11-14)

Empathy and perspective taking: How social skills are built
Being able to feel empathy and to take in the other person's perspective are two abilities through which we understand what is going on in the other's mind. But it is still unclear what exactly they constitute. The Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences has now developed a model which explains what empathy and perspective taking are made of: It is not one specific competence rather than many individual factors that vary according to the situation. (2020-11-10)

The ebb and flow of brain ventricles
Enlarged ventricles in the brains of people with multiple sclerosis were previously considered a sign of tissue loss. But a team at the MDC and ECRC demonstrated that this expansion often recedes. A study published in JCI Insight now shows that the process observed in mice is transferable to humans. (2020-11-05)

A malformation illustrates the incredible plasticity of the brain
One in 4,000 people is born without a corpus callosum, a brain structure consisting of neural fibres that are used to transfer information between hemisphere. 25% of them do not have any symptoms. Neuroscientists from the University of Geneva discovered that when the neuronal fibres that act as a bridge between the hemispheres are missing, the brain reorganises itself and creates an impressive number of connections inside each hemisphere, recreating connections using alternative neural pathways. (2020-10-30)

Children with asymptomatic brain bleeds as newborns show normal brain development at age 2
A study by UNC researchers finds that neurodevelopmental scores and gray matter volumes at age two years did not differ between children who had MRI-confirmed asymptomatic subdural hemorrhages when they were neonates, compared to children with no history of subdural hemorrhage. (2020-10-30)

Cardiac MRI contrast agents carry low risk of adverse events
Contrast agents used to improve views of the heart on MRI carry a very low risk of allergic reactions, vomiting and other acute adverse events, according to a large new study. The findings come three years after the European Union enacted new regulations on the contrast agents. (2020-10-29)

New imaging technique doubles visibility of brain tumors in scans
A new three-dimensional imaging technique has been developed that greatly improves the visibility of brain tumors in magnetic resonance imaging scans. The technique will potentially enable earlier diagnosis of tumors when they are smaller and more treatable. (2020-10-28)

'White matter lesion' mapping tool identifies early signs of dementia
A new tool for analyzing tissue damage seen on MRI brain scans can detect with more than 70% accuracy early signs of cognitive decline, new research shows. (2020-10-27)

18F-Fluciclovine PET/MRI for prostate cancer staging, androgen deprivation evaluation
According to an open-access article in ARRS' American Journal of Roentgenology, fluorine-18-labeled fluciclovine PET/MRI demonstrated utility in the initial staging of high-risk prostate cancer, as well as for evaluating the response to androgen deprivation therapy. Given the FDA approval and widespread availability of 18F-fluciclovine, the findings could have impact in the immediate future in guiding initial management of patients with prostate cancer. (2020-10-27)

'Fast' MRI detects breast cancers that 3-D mammograms may miss
In a retrospective study of asymptomatic patients, all of whom had a negative 3-D mammogram within the previous 11 months, abbreviated MRI detected roughly 27 cancers per 1,000 women screened. (2020-10-27)

Exploring the source of stars and planets in a laboratory
New computer simulation aims to verify a widely held but unproven theory of the source of celestial bodies. (2020-10-23)

MRI safely performed in patients with pacemakers and ICDs
MRI examinations can be performed safely in patients with non-MR compatible cardiac devices, including those who are pacemaker-dependent or have abandoned leads, according to a new study. (2020-10-22)

Global MRI data offers hope for improving treatment of brain injuries
A sizable research consortium coordinated by NTNU and St. Olavs Hospital will analyse large amounts of MRI exam data from around the world. The data will help researchers gain important new understanding about brain injuries in people who have had trauma to the head. The goal is to improve patient health care. (2020-10-22)

Nonverbal doctor-patient rapport relieved pain during acupuncture treatment
When 22 acupuncture clinicians and 23 patients seeking pain relief mirrored each other's facial expressions during acupuncture treatment, patients experienced less pain, according to a new study. Additionally, brain activity involved in representing the mental state of others, which is key for empathy and compassion, became more aligned after the doctor and (2020-10-21)

Dual brain imaging provides insight into neural basis of patient-clinician relationship
Researchers from Massachusetts General Hospital have reported on an experiment using a novel magnetic resonance imaging-based approach to track the effects of different behaviors on the brain while patients and clinicians interact with one another. Their research, published in Science Advances, suggests that mirroring in both facial expressions and brain activity can affect the patient-clinician bond and treatment. In this case, the patients were receiving treatment for pain from an acupuncturist. (2020-10-21)

What lies between grey and white in the brain
A multidisciplinary team led by Nikolaus Weiskopf from the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences (MPI CBS) has succeeded in making the superficial white matter visible in the living human brain. (2020-10-19)

Body MRI reinterpretations plagued by discrepancies and errors
According to an article in ARRS' American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), secondary interpretations of body MRI at tertiary care centers identify a high rate of discrepancies--with primary errors being interpretive in origin--suggesting that subspecialty interpretations should be encouraged, and institutions should provide adequate resources for these interpretations to occur. (2020-10-16)

Malice leaves a nasty smell
Unhealthy behaviours trigger moral judgments that are similar to the basic emotions that contribute to our ability to survive. Two different hypotheses are to be found in the current scientific literature as to the identity of these emotions. After developing a new approach to brain imaging, a research team from the University of Geneva shows that unhealthy behaviours trigger brain responses that are similar to those prompted by bad smells. (2020-10-16)

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