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Current MRSA News and Events, MRSA News Articles.
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SMART and NTU researchers design polymer that can kill drug-resistant bacteria
Researchers from Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART) and Nanyang Technological University (NTU) have developed an antimicrobial polymer that can kill bacteria resistant to commonly used antibiotics - a discovery that can pave the way for developing antibiotics to which bacteria are significantly less resistant. The new beta-peptide polymer can combat superbugs like Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), and it also works against biofilm and persistent bacteria for which current antibiotics have proved ineffective. (2019-12-12)

Crossing borders and growing resistance: a superbug from south Asia
Using whole genome sequencing, researchers have been able to trace the origins and global spread of a multi-drug resistant, community Staphylococcus aureus lineage from the Indian subcontinent, known as the Bengal Bay clone. (2019-11-26)

Potent antimicrobial found that shows promise in fighting staph infections
After screening thousands of small molecules, the research team discovered a potent new antimicrobial they are calling MAC-545496 that is active against MRSA. Unlike conventional antibiotics, this new antimicrobial neither kills the staph infection nor halts its growth on its own, so the potential for antimicrobial resistance may be considerably lessened. (2019-11-25)

Antibiotics: New substances break bacterial resistance
Researchers at the Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) have developed a new, promising class of active ingredients against resistant bacteria. In initial tests in cell cultures and insects, the substances were at least as effective as common antibiotics. The new compounds target a special enzyme that only appears in bacteria in this specific form and that was not previously the target of other antibiotics. The team reported on its work in the journal ''Antibiotics''. (2019-11-11)

Scientists discover how potent bacterial toxin kills MRSA bacteria
Scientists from the University of Sheffield have discovered how a potent bacterial toxin is able to target and kill MRSA, paving the way for potential new treatments for superbugs. (2019-11-04)

Immune cells in skin kill MRSA bacteria before they enter the body
A type of immune cell called neutrophils could be responsible for controlling bacterial numbers of an antibiotic-resistant strain of Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) on human skin before the bacteria get a chance to invade, according to a new study from Karolinska Institutet published in Cell Reports. The results could provide an explanation for why this superbug is only carried transiently by some people. (2019-10-29)

Ants fight plant diseases
New research from Aarhus University shows that ants inhibit at least 14 different plant diseases. The small insects secrete antibiotics from glands in the body. On their legs and body, they also host colonies of bacteria that secrete antibiotics. It is probably these substances that inhibit a number of different diseases and researchers now hope to find biological pesticides that may conquer resistant plant diseases. (2019-10-17)

ATS/IDSA publishes clinical guideline on community acquired pneumonia
The American Thoracic Society and the Infectious Diseases Society of America have published an official clinical guideline on the diagnosis and treatment of adults with community acquired pneumonia (CAP) in the ATS's Oct. 1 American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. (2019-10-01)

New fungus-derived antibiotic: relief in sight for immunocompromised people
Infections that are treatable in healthy people can often be fatal in immunocompromised individuals (people with a weak immune system), and hence, they require specialized treatment. Eushearilide is already known to be active against a wide range of pathogenic fungi and yeasts, but its antibacterial properties have not been explored. Now, scientists from the Tokyo University of Science have derived a new compound from eushearilide and demonstrated its antibacterial and antifungal properties. It can be used to treat lung infections, meningitis, and encephalitis. (2019-09-25)

PolyU develops a new class of antibiotic candidates for fighting against superbugs
The Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU) has developed a new class of antibiotic drug candidates which has high potential to be developed into a new generation of antibiotics fighting against multi-drug resistant superbugs including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). (2019-09-24)

New research shows that European hedgehogs in Denmark carry a secret
Through a research collaboration between Institute of Biology at University of Southern Denmark (SDU), Naturama and Statens Serum Institut, scientists have discovered, that Danish hedgehogs carry mecC-MRSA in their snouts. (2019-09-19)

Genetic mutation appears to protect some people from deadly MRSA
An inherited genetic tendency appears to increase the likelihood that a person can successfully fight off antibiotic-resistant staph infections, according to a study led by Duke Health researchers. (2019-09-16)

Research shows 80% drop in ICU bloodstream infections
Bloodstream infections acquired in UK Intensive Care Units (ICUs) reduced by 80% between 2007 and 2012, according to research funded by the NIHR Guy's and St Thomas' Biomedical Research Centre. (2019-09-10)

Using quantum dots and a smartphone to find killer bacteria
A combination of off-the-shelf quantum dot nanotechnology and a smartphone camera soon could allow doctors to identify antibiotic-resistant bacteria in just 40 minutes, potentially saving patient lives. (2019-08-04)

Self-sterilizing polymer proves effective against drug-resistant pathogens
Researchers have found an elastic polymer that possesses broad-spectrum antimicrobial properties, allowing it to kill a range of viruses and drug-resistant bacteria in just minutes - including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). (2019-08-01)

Cigarette smoke makes MRSA superbug bacterium more drug-resistant
Cigarette smoke can make MRSA bacterial strains more resistant to antibiotics, new research from the University of Bath has shown. (2019-07-30)

Survey shows surveillance for antibiotic-resistant bacteria continues as core focus
A survey by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America demonstrates that surveillance for antibiotic-resistant bacteria continues to be a core focus for healthcare facilities. (2019-07-17)

Immune system effectiveness appears key to antibiotic success against persistent bacteria
Mathematical modeling suggests that the rate at which a patient's immune system clears slow-growing variants of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteria is a key determinant of whether antibiotics can cure the infection. Tsuyoshi Mikkaichi and Alexander Hoffmann of the University of California, Los Angeles, and the MRSA Systems Immunobiology Group present this work in PLOS Computational Biology. (2019-07-11)

Fighting drug resistance with fast, artificial enhancement of natural products
Japanese researchers have identified multiple promising new drug candidates to treat antibiotic-resistant infections, including superbugs. The team developed a new technique to enhance the infection-fighting potential of natural chemicals and test them quickly. In laboratory tests, three of the synthetic molecules that the researchers built are four times more effective at killing bacteria than their natural predecessor, which is itself already an order of magnitude more potent than the current drug used against MRSA, vancomycin. (2019-07-08)

Widely available antibiotics could be used in the treatment of 'superbug' MRSA
Some MRSA infections could be tackled using widely-available antibiotics, suggests new research from an international collaboration led by scientists at the University of Cambridge and the Wellcome Sanger Institute. (2019-06-24)

Hospital-acquired infections may be lower in closed ICUs
Three hospital-acquired infections rates appear to be lower in patients admitted to a 'closed' intensive care unit, meaning that the ICU team has primary responsibility for the patient, rather than a primary care physician, (2019-05-22)

On the way to fighting staph infections with the body's immune system
Researchers have gained a greater understanding of the biology of staphylococcus skin infections in mice and how the mouse immune system mobilizes to fight them. A study appears this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. Community acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) typically causes skin infections but can spread throughout the body to cause invasive infections such as sepsis, and possibly death. (2019-05-15)

Antibiotic resistance gene transmitted between pets at a UK animal hospital
A gene that enables bacteria to be highly resistant to linezolid, an antibiotic that is used as a last resort for treating infections in humans, has been found in bacterial samples from cats and a dog at a small-animal hospital in the UK for the first time. The new research is being presented at this year's European Congress of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) in Amsterdam, Netherlands (April 13-16, 2019). (2019-04-15)

'Superbugs' found on many hospital patients' hands and what they touch most often
For decades, hospitals have worked to get staff to wash their hands and prevent the spread of germs. But a new study suggests they may want to expand those efforts to their patients, too. Fourteen percent of 399 hospital patients had 'superbug' antibiotic-resistant bacteria on their hands or nostrils early in their hospital stay, and nearly a third of tests for such bacteria on objects that patients commonly touch came back positive. (2019-04-13)

Ecological study identifies potential association between antimicrobial resistance and climate change
New research presented at this week's 29th European Congress of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) in Amsterdam, Netherlands (April 13-16), identifies a novel association between antibiotic resistance and climate change. (2019-04-13)

Study underlines large variation in patient mortality associated with different bloodstream infections
New research presented at this year's European Congress of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) in Amsterdam, Netherlands (April 13-16) shows the danger posed by bloodstream infections (BSIs), and the large variation in mortality rates associated with different infectious microorganisms. The study is by Liya Lomsadze and colleagues from Northwell Health, Great Neck, N.Y., United States. (2019-04-12)

Privacy curtains used in healthcare worldwide are a potential source of drug-resistant bacteria transmission to patients
New research presented at this year's European Congress of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) in Amsterdam, Netherlands (April 13-16) shows that contamination of privacy curtains with multidrug-resistant organisms is a common problem and could be a source of disease transmission to patients. (2019-04-11)

Blue light could treat superbug infections
Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), a bacterium that causes infection in various parts of the body, is often called a 'superbug' thanks to its ability to dodge many common antibiotics. Rather than rolling the dice with a multi-drug combination or wasting precious time trying to determine which medicine to prescribe, doctors could soon use a new method for disarming the superbugs: light therapy. (2019-04-02)

Fish slime: An untapped source of potential new antibiotics
As current antibiotics dwindle in effectiveness against multidrug-resistant pathogens, researchers are seeking potential replacements in some unlikely places. Now a team has identified bacteria with promising antibiotic activity against known pathogens -- even dangerous organisms, such as the microbe that causes MRSA infections -- in the protective mucus that coats young fish. The researchers will present their results today at the American Chemical Society Spring 2019 National Meeting & Exposition. (2019-03-31)

Pollutants, pathogens could team up to make us sick
Many people view pollutants and pathogens as separate causes of illness. However, recent research indicates that the two can interact, changing how people and animals respond to infectious diseases. According to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, environmental pollutants appear to weaken the immune system, reduce vaccine efficacy and increase pathogen virulence. (2019-03-20)

Germ-fighting catheter coating may help prevent infections
In an innovation that may ultimately help to prevent deadly bloodstream infections, a team of biomedical engineers and infectious disease specialists at Brown University developed a coating to keep intravascular catheters from becoming a haven for harmful bacteria. (2019-03-07)

Results of trial to stem hospital-acquired bacterial infections published
A trial evaluated whether daily bathing with the antiseptic soap chlorhexidine (CHG) -- and in those patients with MRSA, adding the nasal antibiotic mupirocin -- more effectively reduced hospital-acquired bacterial infections than bathing with ordinary soap and water. The researchers found that one subset of patients -- those with medical devices -- experienced a substantial benefit if they received the CHG/mupirocin intervention. (2019-03-05)

Infection control technique may reduce infections in patients with catheters, drains
Each year, approximately 5 million patients in the United States receive treatment that includes the insertion of a medical device such as a catheter, which puts them at increased risk of potentially life-threatening infection. Researchers have found a strategy that greatly reduced both overall infection and infection with antibiotic-resistant bacteria in a group of these patients. The results of their study were published today in the online issue of The Lancet. (2019-03-05)

Results of ABATE infection trial published
Daily bathing with an antiseptic soap, plus nasal ointment for patients with prior antibiotic resistant bacteria, reduced hospital acquired infections among patients with central venous catheters and other devices that pierce the skin, according to results of the ABATE Infection Trial. The study, ''Chlorhexidine versus Routine Bathing to Prevent Multi Drug-Resistant Organisms and All-Cause Bloodstream Infection in General Medical and Surgical Units: The ABATE Infection Cluster Randomized Trial,'' was published March 5 in The Lancet, Online. (2019-03-05)

Decolonization protocol can prevent dangerous infections among discharged hospital patients
Hospital patients who have methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) can prevent future MRSA infections by following a standard bathing protocol after discharge, according to research results published in the Feb. 14 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. (2019-02-14)

Experimental treatment approach shows potential against Staphylococcus aureus
A new class of engineered proteins may counter infection caused by Staph aureus. (2019-01-16)

New study of MRSA spread provides framework for community-based infection surveillance
The identification of the recent spread of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) in a Brooklyn religious enclave is helping medical experts better understand how certain high-risk populations can drive the evolution of antimicrobial resistance and identify steps that can be taken to curtail its spread, according to a new study. (2019-01-07)

Computer model shows how to better control MRSA outbreaks
A research team led by scientists at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health report on a new method to help health officials control outbreaks of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, or MRSA, a life-threatening antibiotic-resistant infection often seen in hospitals. The researchers are the first to reveal the invisible dynamics governing the spread of these outbreaks and demonstrate a new, more effective method to prevent their spread. Findings are published in the journal eLife. (2019-01-02)

Multicenter trial supports use of topical antibiotics in NICU babies
A team of doctors led by Karen L. Kotloff, M.D., University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM), Center for Vaccine Development and Global Health (CVD), has performed a clinical trial involving multiple hospitals that tested the effectiveness of applying a topical antibiotic known as mupirocin for prevention of Staphylococcus aureus (SA) infection in babies in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). This study was published in the journal Pediatrics. (2018-12-27)

Bacteria found in ancient Irish soil halts growth of superbugs -- new hope for tackling antibiotic resistance
Researchers analyzing soil from Ireland long thought to have medicinal properties have discovered that it contains a previously unknown strain of bacteria which is effective against four of the top six superbugs that are resistant to antibiotics, including MRSA. Antibiotic-resistant superbugs could kill up to 1.3 million people in Europe by 2050, according to recent research. The World Health Organisation (WHO) describes the problem as 'one of the biggest threats to global health, food security, and development today.' (2018-12-27)

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