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Current Macrophages News and Events, Macrophages News Articles.
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Fats fighting back against bacteria
With antibiotic-resistant superbugs on the rise, this research shows a new way that cells are using to protect themselves - using fats as a covert weapon, and giving us new insights into alternative ways to fight infection. (2020-10-16)

Protein that keeps immune system from freaking out could form basis for new therapeutics
Treatment with a peptide that mimics the naturally occurring protein GIV prevents immune overreaction and supports a mechanism critical for survival in mouse models of sepsis and colitis, according to a UC San Diego study. (2020-10-14)

Bacterial toxin with healing effect
A bacterial toxin promoting tissue healing has been discovered by an international research team led by scientists from University of Jena (Germany). The compound α-Hemolysine found in Staphylococcus aureus does not just damage cells, but also stimulates tissue regeneration. (2020-10-13)

The choroid plexus: A conduit for prenatal inflammation?
New work offers an unprecedented real-time view of the choroid plexus in a mouse model, providing a glimpse of how disturbances of the mother's immune system during pregnancy disrupt the developing brain. (2020-10-09)

Vaccine ingredients could be hiding in small molecule libraries
Many vaccines include ingredients called adjuvants that help make them more effective by eliciting a stronger immune response. Identifying potential adjuvants just got easier, thanks to an approach described by scientists at Kyoto University's Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (iCeMS) and colleagues in the journal Angewandte Chemie. (2020-10-02)

Hackensack Meridian CDI scientists find one-two punch for preclinical cancer models
Research findings published Aug. 14, 2020 in the journal Cancer Research suggest that since some cancer treatments can be undermined by epigenetic changes (altered DNA methylation affecting gene expression) in cancer cells before the treatments are even administered, a worthwhile strategy is to administer an epigenetically-acting drug - which can pave the way for more effective subsequent use of immune-acting cancer treatments. (2020-09-30)

Drug found to correct gene defect that causes immune-driven gut leakiness
A team of researchers led by biomedical scientist Declan McCole at the University of California, Riverside, has found that the drug tofacitinib, also called Xeljanz and approved by the FDA to treat rheumatoid arthritis and ulcerative colitis, can repair permeability defects in the intestine. ''Our work could help improve identification of patients who will be better responders to this drug,'' says McCole, a professor of biomedical sciences in the School of Medicine. (2020-09-29)

CNIC researchers discover a mechanism allowing immune cells to regulate obesity
A CNIC's team have discovered a mechanism explaining how macrophages regulate obesity. The results published in Nature Metabolism could be useful to design new treatments for the obese and overweight, and for some associated pathologies, including fatty liver disease and type 2 diabetes. (2020-09-17)

CNIC researchers discover a cell-cleaning system that keeps hearts healthy
The study published in Cell shows that macrophages, a type of immune cell, help cardiac cells to get rid of their waste material, and that this maintains the metabolic and contractile properties of the heart. (2020-09-15)

Pro-inflammatory lipids precede Type 1 diabetes onset in mouse model and children
Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease where immune cells -- led by inflammatory macrophages -- attack and destroy the pancreatic beta cells. It now appears that inflammatory lipid signaling may help provoke this attack. Researchers have identified a proinflammatory lipid profile that precedes development of T1D in a mouse model and in children under age 15 who are at high risk for T1D. This finding may identify candidate lipid therapeutic targets to prevent T1D. (2020-09-09)

Cellular-level interactions that lead to the cytokine storm in COVID-19
Scientists review macrophage activation syndrome -- a feature of the cytokine storm that kills patients with severe cases of COVID-19, as well as possible treatments. (2020-09-08)

Obesity may alter immune system response to COVID-19
Obesity may cause a hyperactive immune system response to COVID-19 infection that makes it difficult to fight off the virus, according to a new manuscript published in the Endocrine Society's journal, Endocrinology. (2020-09-03)

UCalgary researchers discover how to capture images of cells at work inside our lungs
University of Calgary scientists have discovered how to capture ''live'' images of immune cells inside the lungs. The group at the Cumming School of Medicine is the first in the world to find a way to record, in real time, how the immune system battles bacteria impacting the alveoli, or air sacs, in the lungs of mice. The discovery has already provided new insights about the immune systems' cleaners, called alveolar macrophages. (2020-09-03)

Fat crystals trigger chronic inflammation
A congenital disorder of the fat metabolism can apparently cause chronic hyperreaction of the immune system. This is the conclusion reached by researchers from the University of Bonn in a recent study. The results are published in the journal Autophagy. (2020-08-24)

Reprogramming immune cells to reduce inflammation, promote tissue repair
A new study suggests that macrophage programming is more complex than previously thought. 'We found that macrophage programming is driven by more than the immune system -- it is also driven by the environment in which the macrophages reside,' said lead study author Asrar Malik. (2020-08-24)

World film premiere: Watch cell infected by tuberculosis die
Norwegian researchers have managed to show exactly how the tuberculosis bacterium kills its host cell by filming the process in detail for the first time. Every year, 1.5 million people die of TB. (2020-08-17)

Immunotherapy-resistant cancers eliminated in mouse study
In a mouse study, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that an antibody that targets the protein TREM2 empowers tumor-destroying immune cells and improves the effectiveness of cancer immunotherapy. (2020-08-11)

Researchers characterize important regulators of tissue inflammation, fibrosis and regeneration
Although macrophages (cells involved in the detection and destruction of bacteria and other harmful organisms as well as dead cells) are classified as immune cells functioning in the activation and resolution of tissue inflammation, it is now clear that they are critically involved in a variety of disease processes, such as chronic inflammatory diseases, tumor growth and metastasis and tissue fibrosis. (2020-08-10)

The yin and yang of inflammation controlled by a single molecule
Penn Study Reveals A Molecular Mechanism That Helps The Body Mount Perfectly Balanced Responses to Deadly Infections (2020-08-05)

Assembly within the tumor center
Number of macrophages in tumor tissue enables prognosis of lung tumor progression. (2020-08-04)

Study: Enzyme could prove effective in treating tumors and inflammatory diseases in lung
Findings from a research study led by scientists at Henry Ford suggest an enzyme could play an important role in the treatment of cancer and autoimmune diseases in the airway. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are enzymes that help modulate gene expression by removing acetyl groups from histone or non-histone proteins. Inhibition of HDACs is emerging as a promising approach to treat various types of malignant diseases and inflammatory disorders. (2020-08-04)

Identification of new "oxidative stress sensor" MTK1
A research group at the Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo in Japan has uncovered a new mechanism that elicits a cellular response by detecting oxidative stress in the human body. MTK1 SAPKKK functions is identified as a new human oxidative stress sensor that senses excess active oxygen in the body and transmits that information to cells, leading to cell death and inflammatory cytokine production. (2020-07-28)

Influenza virus-induced oxidized DNA activates inflammasomes
In this study, a research group at The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo (IMSUT) observed nucleus- and mitochondria-derived double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) in extracellular web-like structures in the cytoplasm and extracellular space around influenza virus-infected macrophages. (2020-07-21)

How the regulator is regulated -- Insight into immune-related protein holds therapeutic value
Various proteins expressed in cells of the immune system have shown to play an important role in various disorders, including cancer, allergy, and autoimmune disease. In a new study, scientists find out how an immune checkpoint protein called PD-L2, which is expressed on the surface of a type of immune cells, is regulated at the molecular level. The findings of this study have the potential to usher in new developments in the field of immune therapy. (2020-07-21)

Combating drug resistance in age-related macular degeneration
An international team of researchers led by Baylor College of Medicine and Houston Methodist has discovered a strategy that can potentially address a major challenge to the current treatment for age-related macular degeneration, (2020-07-16)

Cancer cells in inhospitable brain fluids hijack iron to survive
In order to survive within the remote and harsh anatomical microenvironments of the central nervous system, the disseminated cancer cells that cause rare yet deadly leptomeningeal metastases (LM) hijack crucial iron micronutrients from native macrophages, researchers report. (2020-07-16)

Reprogramming of immune cells enhances effects of radiotherapy in preclinical models of brain cancer
A Ludwig Cancer Research study has dissected how radiotherapy alters the behavior of immune cells known as macrophages found in glioblastoma (GBM) tumors and shown how these cells might be reprogrammed with an existing drug to suppress the invariable recurrence of the aggressive brain cancer (2020-07-15)

St18 is a negative regulator of VEGF
A research team led by Kenta Maruyama M.D., Ph.D. from National Institute for Physiological Sciences explored the role of St18 in the regulation of VEGF expression. Mice lacking St18 in myeloid lineages are highly susceptible to septic shock. These mice also exhibit increased retinal vasculature with enhanced serum VEGF concentrations, and pharmacological inhibition of VEGF signaling rescues the high mortality rate of septic shock. These findings suggest that St18 is a negative regulator of VEGF. (2020-07-14)

Age research: A low level of the stress hormone cortisol contributes to the ageing process
Why do we age? What exactly is happening in our bodies? And can we do anything about it? Mankind has sought answers to these questions since time immemorial. While the pharmaceutical scientists Alexandra K. Kiemer and Jessica Hoppstädter from Saarland University are not claiming to have solved this ancient problem, they have uncovered processes within our immune system that contribute to ageing. (2020-07-01)

Implants: Can special coatings reduce complications after implant surgery?
New coatings on implants could help make them more compatible. Researchers at the Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) have developed a new method of applying anti-inflammatory substances to implants in order to inhibit undesirable inflammatory reactions in the body. Their study was recently published in the ''International Journal of Molecular Sciences''. (2020-06-30)

Immune cells infiltrating tumors may play bigger cancer role than previously thought
UC San Diego researchers uncovered in mice how IRE1α, a molecule involved in cells' response to stress, determines whether macrophages promote inflammation in the tumor microenvironment. Inflammation is known to promote tumor growth, making IRE1α an attractive target for drug development. (2020-06-22)

Re-trafficking proteins to fight Salmonella infections
New study demonstrates how monitoring all cellular proteins over time and space can improve our understanding of host-pathogen interactions. (2020-06-09)

Photodynamic therapy used to treat ovarian cancer
Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is one of the most promising methods of treating localized tumors. PDT can be used for treatment in almost all major locations as an independent method or in combination with traditional types of treatment (surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy). (2020-06-08)

Approved drug may help calm cytokine storm in COVID-19
The drug acalabrutinib, FDA-approved for the treatment of several types of B cell cancers, improved the oxygenation levels and decreased molecular markers of inflammation in a majority of 19 patients hospitalized for the treatment of severe COVID-19, according to a new study by Mark Roschewski and colleagues. (2020-06-05)

Ludwig Lausanne study charts the immune landscape of multiple brain cancers
A Ludwig Cancer Research study has profiled, in a sweeping comparative analysis, the distinct immune landscapes of tumors that arise in the brain, or gliomas, and those that metastasize to the organ from the lungs, breast and skin. (2020-05-28)

Stimulating immune cleanup crew offers a possibility for treating rare disorder
Compounds that mimicked the process known as efferocytosis alleviated signs of leukocyte adhesion deficiency type-1 in an animal model, according to work led by the University of Pennsylvania's George Hajishengallis. (2020-05-26)

Preventing 'cytokine storm' may ease severe COVID-19 symptoms
A clinical trial in people with the new coronavirus is testing a drug that may halt an overactive immune response before it ramps up. (2020-05-21)

Not all multiple sclerosis-like diseases are alike
Scientists say some myelin-damaging disorders have a distinctive pathology that groups them into a unique disease entity. (2020-05-18)

'Cells-soldiers' turned to be more resistant than 'cells-combat medics'
Researchers from Sechenov University (Russia) and University of Pittsburgh (USA) discovered that the resistance of innate immune cells, macrophages, to ferroptosis -- a type of programmed cell death -- depends on the type of their activation. It turned out that cells helping tissues to recover from inflammation were more vulnerable. The researchers identified the mechanisms underlying the cells' resistance and explained how this research would help regulate inflammation in a paper published in Nature Chemical Biology. (2020-05-16)

Platelets exacerbate immune response
Platelets not only play a key role in blood clotting, but can also significantly intensify inflammatory processes. This is shown by a new study carried out by scientists from the University of Bonn together with colleagues from Sao Paulo (Brazil). In the medium term, the results could open up new ways to treat autoimmune diseases. They have now been published in the renowned journal Cell Reports. (2020-05-12)

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