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Current Macrophages News and Events, Macrophages News Articles.
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CAR macrophages go beyond T cells to fight solid tumors
Penn Medicine research shows genetically engineering macrophages -- an immune cell that eats invaders in the body -- could be the key to unlocking cellular therapies that effectively target solid tumors (2020-03-23)
A new strategy for the management of inflammatory pain
A group of researchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin has discovered a new mechanism of long-lasting pain relief. (2020-03-16)
Intralipid improves efficacy of chemotherapy treatment
Pairing chemotherapy nanodrugs with a nutritional supplement can lessen devastating side-effects while reducing the amount of the expensive drugs needed to treat cancer according to a study from Carnegie Mellon University and Taiwan's National Health Research Institutes. (2020-03-10)
Engineered bone marrow cells slow growth of prostate and pancreatic cancer cells
In experiments with mice, researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center say they have slowed the growth of transplanted human prostate and pancreatic cancer cells by introducing bone marrow cells with a specific gene deletion to induce a novel immune response. (2020-03-05)
Hydrogen sulfide heightens disease in tuberculosis, suggesting a new therapeutic target
A new culprit -- hydrogen sulfide -- has been found for the deadly infectious disease tuberculosis. (2020-03-03)
Researchers identify protein critical for wound healing after spinal cord injury
Plexin-B2, an axon guidance protein in the central nervous system (CNS), plays an important role in wound healing and neural repair following spinal cord injury (SCI), according to research conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published today in Nature Neuroscience (2020-03-02)
Imaging can guide whether liquid biopsy will benefit individual glioblastoma patients
New research shows brain imaging may be able to predict when a blood test known as a liquid biopsy would or would not produce clinically actionable information, allowing doctors to more efficiently guide patients to the proper next steps in their care. (2020-02-27)
Study unravels how our immune system deals with fungal and viral infections
The body's immune response to fungal infections changes when a patient is also infected by a virus, according to new research which investigated the two types of infection together for the first time. (2020-02-27)
Possible new treatment strategy for fatty liver disease
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have identified a molecular pathway that when silenced could restore the normal function of immune cells in people with fatty liver disease. (2020-02-26)
Lipid signaling from beta cells can potentiate an inflammatory macrophage polarization
The insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas unwittingly produce a signal that may aid their own demise in Type 1 diabetes, according to a study of the lipid signals that drive macrophage cells in the body to two different phenotypes of activated immune cells. (2020-02-21)
Immune cells consult with neighbors to make decisions
Researchers have uncovered new evidence that immune cells count their neighbors before deciding whether or not the immune system should kick into high gear. (2020-02-13)
Stroke: Macrophages migrate from the blood
Macrophages are part of the innate immune system and essential for brain development and function. (2020-02-11)
Abnormal bone formation after trauma explained and reversed in mice
New study findings implicate a specific type of immune cell behind heterotopic ossification, or abnormal bone formation and present a possible target for treatment. (2020-02-06)
Targeting the cancer microenvironment
The recognition of bacterial infections or foreign substances is mediated and controlled by the human immune system. (2020-02-05)
Brain links to embryonic immunity, guiding response of the 'troops' that battle infection
Researchers have discovered that the brains of developing embryos provide signals to a nascent immune system that help it ward off infections and significantly improve the embryo's ability to survive a bacterial challenge. (2020-02-04)
Double X-ray vision helps tuberculosis and osteoporosis research
With an X-ray combination technique, scientists have traced nanocarriers for tuberculosis drugs within cells with very high precision. (2020-02-04)
New target identified for repairing the heart after heart attack
An immune cell is shown for the first time to be involved in creating the scar that repairs the heart after damage. (2020-01-30)
Double trouble: A drug for alcoholism can also treat cancer by targeting macrophages
The deadly nature of cancer stems from its ability to spread and grow inside the host. (2020-01-30)
Putrid compound may have a sweet side gig as atherosclerosis treatment
A compound associated with the smell of death may have potential as a treatment for atherosclerosis and other chronic inflammatory diseases. (2020-01-30)
Immune response in brain, spinal cord could offer clues to treating neurological diseases
An unexpected research finding is providing information that could lead to new treatments of certain neurological diseases and disorders, including multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer's. (2020-01-30)
Pneumonia recovery reprograms immune cells of the lung
Researchers have determined that after lungs recover from infection, alveolar macrophages (immune cells that live in the lungs and help protect the lungs against infection) are different in multiple ways and those differences persist indefinitely. (2020-01-28)
Nanoparticle chomps away plaques that cause heart attacks
Michigan State University and Stanford University scientists have invented a nanoparticle that eats away -- from the inside out -- portions of plaques that cause heart attacks. (2020-01-27)
TP53 gene variant in people of African descent linked to iron overload, may improve malaria response
In a study by Wistar and collaborators, a rare, African-specific variant of the TP53 gene called P47S causes iron accumulation in macrophages and other cell types and is associated with poorer response to bacterial infections, along with markers of iron overload in African Americans. (2020-01-24)
With a protein 'delivery,' parasite can suppress its host's immune response
The parasite Toxoplasma gondii need not infect a host immune cell to alter its behavior, according to a new study from the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine. (2020-01-24)
Exposure to diesel exhaust particles linked to pneumococcal disease susceptibility
A new study, published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, shows that exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEPs) can increase an individual's susceptibility to pneumococcal disease. (2020-01-23)
Immune system cells contribute to the invading capacity of brain tumours
An article published in Brain Communications, coordinated by Carlos Barcia, researcher at Institut de Neurociències de la UAB, describes how the immune system facilitates the expansion of tumour cells in the brain. (2020-01-23)
High-protein diets boost artery-clogging plaque, mouse study shows
High-protein diets may help people lose weight and build muscle, but a new study in mice suggests they have a down side: They lead to more plaque in the arteries. (2020-01-23)
Researchers identify a possible cause and treatment for inflammatory bowel disease
In a study published online in PNAS on Jan. 20, 2020, Prof. (2020-01-21)
Two cancer-causing genes work together to promote metastasis
Cancer-promoting genes MYC and TWIST1 co-opt immune system cells to enable cancer cells to spread, but blocking a key step in this process can help prevent the disease from developing. (2020-01-14)
Research identifies new route for tackling drug resistance in skin cancer cells
Researchers have found that melanoma cells fight anti-cancer drugs by changing their internal skeleton (cytoskeleton) -- opening up a new therapeutic route for combating skin and other cancers that develop resistance to treatment. (2020-01-13)
Boost to lung immunity following infection
The strength of the immune system in response to respiratory infections is constantly changing, depending on the history of previous, unrelated infections, according to new research from the Crick. (2020-01-13)
Scientists examine how a gut infection may produce chronic symptoms
For some unlucky people, a bout of intestinal distress like traveler's diarrhea leads to irritable bowel syndrome. (2020-01-10)
Scientists discover how TB puts the brakes on our immune engines
The scientists pinpointed a small mRNA molecule used by TB bacteria to shut down key engines that drive our immune response. (2020-01-08)
Removing body clock gene protects mice against pneumonia
This is the first time a clock gene has been found to affect resistance to bacterial pneumonia, a fatal disease responsible for 5% of all deaths in the UK each year. (2020-01-06)
Finding a new way to fight late-stage sepsis
Researchers have developed a way to prop up a struggling immune system to enable its fight against sepsis, a deadly condition resulting from the body's extreme reaction to infection. (2020-01-06)
Targeting cholesterol metabolism in macrophages to eliminate viral infection
A new study published in Immunity now provides important new information. (2019-12-27)
Researchers identify immune-suppressing target in glioblastoma
Researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have identified a tenacious subset of immune macrophages that thwart treatment of glioblastoma with anti-PD-1 checkpoint blockade, elevating a new potential target for treating the almost uniformly lethal brain tumor. (2019-12-23)
Breaking the dogma: Key cell death regulator has more than one way to get the job done
Immunologists from St. Jude Children's Research Hospital have revealed two independent mechanisms driving self-defense molecules to trigger cell death. (2019-12-23)
How immune cells switch to attack mode
Macrophages have 2 faces: In healthy tissue, they perform important tasks and support their environment. (2019-12-17)
How a cellular shuttle helps HIV-1 spread in immune organs
New insight on how a type of cell facilitates the spread of HIV-1 has been published today in the open-access journal eLife. (2019-12-03)
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