Current Mad Cow Disease News and Events

Current Mad Cow Disease News and Events, Mad Cow Disease News Articles.
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Prion diseases: new clues in the structure of prion proteins
A new study carried out by SISSA - Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati in collaboration with other institutions including Genos Glycoscience. Research Laboratory from Zagreb, Croatia and Elettra Sincrotrone Trieste, provides important information on the differences in structures of the prions, proteins responsible for diseases that at the state of the art are incurable. (2021-02-19)

Rumen additive and controlled energy benefit dairy cows during dry period
Getting nutrition right during a dairy cow's dry period can make a big difference to her health and the health of her calf. But it's also a key contributor to her milk yield after calving. New research from the University of Illinois shows diets containing consistent energy levels and the rumen-boosting supplement monensin may be ideal during the dry period. (2021-01-28)

Scientists reveal mechanism that causes irritable bowel syndrome
KU Leuven researchers have identified the biological mechanism that explains why some people experience abdominal pain when they eat certain foods. The finding paves the way for more efficient treatment of irritable bowel syndrome and other food intolerances. The study, carried out in mice and humans, was published in Nature. (2021-01-13)

Drinking milk while breastfeeding may reduce the child's food allergy risk
Children of mothers who drink relatively more cow's milk during breastfeeding are at reduced risk of developing food allergies. That is the conclusion of researchers from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, in a new study published in the scientific journal Nutrients. (2020-12-21)

Dark excitons hit the spotlight
Heralding the end of a decade-long quest, in a promising new class of extremely thin, two-dimensional semiconductors, scientists in Japan have for the first time directly visualized and measured elusive particles, called dark excitons, that cannot be seen by light. The powerful technique, described in Science, could revolutionize research into two-dimensional semiconductors and excitons, with profound implications for future technological devices, from solar cells and LEDs to smartphones and lasers. (2020-12-03)

Follow your gut: How farms protect from childhood asthma
Asthma impacts millions of children already at a young age. Children growing up on a farm have a lower risk of developing asthma than children not living on a farm. The mechanisms behind this protective farm effect on childhood asthma are largely unknown. A group of researchers from Helmholtz Zentrum München and the Dr. von Hauner Children's Hospital of Ludwig Maximilians University Munich (LMU) clarified how the children's gut microbiome is involved in the protection process. (2020-11-02)

Removing this hidden nasty from our food could save thousands of lives
Banning a harmful ingredient from the Australian food supply could prevent thousands of deaths from heart disease according to new research from The George Institute for Global Health. (2020-11-02)

Diagnosing Parkinson's disease with skin samples could lead to earlier detection
New research shows a simple skin test can accurately identify Parkinson's disease, which could lead to earlier detection of the disease and better outcomes for patients. Currently, Parkinson's disease is diagnosed by clinical signs and symptoms but only definitively diagnosed at autopsy. The researchers conducted a blinded study of 50 skin samples using an assay originally designed to detect mad cow disease. (2020-10-21)

Golden meat: Engineering cow cells to produce beta carotene
Scientists exploit carotenoid pathway used in golden rice to grow nutritionally enhanced, cell-cultured meat. (2020-10-15)

Effect of avoiding cow's milk formula at birth on preventing asthma in children
Extended follow-up of randomized clinical trial participants was used to investigate whether the risk of asthma or recurrent wheeze among young children was changed by avoiding supplementing breastfeeding with cow's milk formula after birth. (2020-10-02)

Placenta is initiated first, as cells of a fertilised egg divide and specialise
The first stages of placental development take place days before the embryo starts to form in human pregnancies. The finding highlights the importance of healthy placental development in pregnancy, and could lead to future improvements in fertility treatments such as IVF, and a better understanding of placental-related diseases in pregnancy. (2020-09-24)

True size of prehistoric mega-shark finally revealed
A new study led by the University of Bristol and Swansea University has revealed the size of the legendary giant shark Megalodon, including fins that are as large as an adult human. (2020-09-03)

Human milk based fortifiers improve health outcomes for the smallest premature babies
More than 380,000 babies are born prematurely in the United States each year, according to the March of Dimes. 'Preemies' can be severely underweight babies and struggle to get the nutrients they need from breast milk alone, so neonatal intensive care units provide an additional milk fortifier, either in the form of cow's milk or manufactured from donor breast milk, to keep them healthy. (2020-08-12)

Researchers identify a protein that may help SARS-CoV-2 spread rapidly through cells
Eric Ross and Sean Cascarina, biochemistry and molecular biology researchers at Colorado State University, have released a research paper identifying a protein encoded by SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, that may be associated with the quick spread of the virus through cells in the human body. Through powerful application of the foundational sciences and bioinformatic analysis their research highlights key characteristics of the virus that could one day be important in the development of a treatment for COVID-19. (2020-08-12)

Researchers find new potential treatment for prion diseases
A new study in Nucleic Acids Research suggests a possible effective treatment strategy for patients suffering from prion disease. (2020-08-10)

Young women with polycystic ovary syndrome have raised risk of heart disease
Women in their 30s and 40s with a common condition affecting how the ovaries work are more likely to get heart disease. That's the finding of a study published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). ''Polycystic ovary syndrome isn't a life sentence - there are many ways to stay heart healthy,'' said study author Dr. Clare Oliver-Williams of the University of Cambridge, UK. (2020-08-02)

Correct dosage of methane-inhibiting additive in dairy cow feed shown in study
The optimum amount of a methane-inhibiting supplement in dairy cattle feed has been determined by an international team of researchers, indicating that widespread use of the compound could be an affordable climate change-battling strategy, if farmers embrace it. (2020-07-23)

Mitigation of greenhouse gases in dairy cattle through genetic selection
Researchers in Spain propose mitigating methane production by dairy cattle through breeding. In an article appearing in the Journal of Dairy Science, scientists are targeting reduction of enteric methane in the breeding objectives for dairy cattle to select for animals that use feed more efficiently and thus produce less methane. Because livestock farming contributes 13 percent of global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, selective breeding can reduce those emissions while increasing milk output. (2020-07-22)

New drug targets clots: A potential treatment for heart attack and stroke prevention
Monash researchers have developed a drug that can be potentially given as a preventative against heart attack. The drug -- which has been studied in human cells and animal models -- literally blocks the minute changes in blood flow that preempts a heart attack and acts on the platelets preventing the platelet-triggered clot before it can kill or cause damage. (2020-07-22)

Abnormal proteins in the gut could contribute to the development of Alzheimer's Disease
A new study published in The Journal of Physiology has shown that misfolded protein build-up in the gut could contribute to the development of Alzheimer's-like symptoms in mice. This could suggest a new treatment approach for Alzheimer's disease that would target the gut before symptoms of cognitive deficits appear in patients. (2020-07-02)

Obstructive sleep apnoea: Mandibular advancement device helps against daytime sleepiness
Obstructive sleep apnoea: mandibular advancement device helps against daytime sleepiness In obstructive sleep apnoea, wearing a plastic splint in the mouth at night to keep the airways open mechanically is about as effective as positive airway pressure therapy with a sleep mask. (2020-06-03)

Piecing together the Dead Sea Scrolls with DNA evidence
Piecing together the collection of more than 25,000 fragments of ancient manuscripts known as the Dead Sea Scrolls in order to understand their meaning has remained an incredibly difficult puzzle. Now, researchers reporting in the journal Cell on June 2 have used an intriguing clue to help in this effort: DNA ''fingerprints'' lifted from the animal skins on which the texts were written. (2020-06-02)

Astrophysicists capture new class of transient objects
After astronomers visually spotted a bright burst in a tiny galaxy 500 million lightyears away from Earth in 2016, a Northwestern University-led team has determined that the anomaly is the third fast blue optical transient (FBOT) ever captured in radio- and X-ray wavelengths. (2020-05-26)

Astronomers discover new class of cosmic explosions
Analysis of two cosmic explosions indicates to astronomers that the pair, along with a puzzling blast from 2018, constitute a new type of event, with similarities to some supernovae and gamma-ray bursts, but also with significant differences. (2020-05-26)

Peptides that can be taken as a pill
Peptides represent a billion-dollar market in the pharmaceutical industry, but they can generally only be taken as injections to avoid degradation by stomach enzymes. Scientists at EPFL have now developed a method to generate peptides that resist enzymatic degradation and can be taken orally. (2020-05-11)

Researchers present a microbial strain capable of massive succinic acid production
A research team led by Distinguished Professor Sang-Yup Lee reported the production of a microbial strain capable of the massive production of succinic acid with the highest production efficiency to date. This strategy of integrating systems metabolic engineering with enzyme engineering will be useful for the production of industrially competitive bio-based chemicals. (2020-05-06)

Unraveling one of prion disease's deadly secrets
In a new paper in Nature Structural and Molecular Biology by Tricia Serio, dean of the College of Natural Sciences and professor of biochemistry and molecular biology at UMass Amherst, and others, report an unanticipated role for prion nucleation seeds that enhances their ability to appear and resist curing. (2020-05-05)

Milk allergy guidelines may cause overdiagnosis in babies and children
Current medical guidelines for diagnosing cow's milk allergy in babies and young children may be linked to overdiagnosis of the condition. (2020-04-13)

Tracking tau
In the fight against neurodegenerative diseases such as frontotemporal dementia, Alzheimer's and Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy, the tau protein is a major culprit. Found abundantly in our brain cells, tau is normally a team player -- it maintains structure and stability within neurons, and it helps with transport of nutrients from one part of the cell to another. (2020-04-01)

Shifting dimensions: Exciting excitons in phosphorene
Scientists at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) have explored how an excited state of matter -- excitons -- behaves in phosphorene, a two-dimensional material that could be used in LEDs, solar cells, and other optoelectronic devices. The researchers found that they can control whether excitons interact in one or two dimensions within phosphorene, enhancing its prospects as a new material in optoelectronic devices. (2020-03-25)

Study examines environmental footprint of california dairy cows over 50 years
Producing a liter of milk in California emits less greenhouse gas and uses less land and water than it did in 1964, according to a recent study from researchers at the University of California, Davis. (2020-03-12)

Stabilizing freeze-dried cellular machinery unlocks cell-free biotechnology
A low-cost approach improves cell-free biotechnology's utility for bio-manufacturing and portability for field applications. (2020-02-25)

Holstein steers that get hormone implants perform as well as implanted beef cows
Holstein steers that get hormone implants grow faster than those that do not receive the implants, and they get as big as beef cattle breeds, according to Penn State researchers, who say that's good news for dairy farmers struggling to keep their operations financially viable. (2020-02-14)

Foot-and-mouth-disease virus could help target the deadliest cancer
The foot-and-mouth-disease virus is helping scientists to tackle a common cancer with the worst survival rate -- pancreatic cancer. (2020-02-11)

NYUAD researchers design proteins that can be utilized to combat Alzheimer's disease
A team of researchers, led by NYU Abu Dhabi Assistant Professor of Biology Mazin Magzoub, has developed small proteins called cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) that prevent the aggregation of the amyloid-β (Aβ) protein associated with Alzheimer's disease. (2020-02-05)

New research looks at type 1 diabetes and changes in the environment
Studies have shown a rapid increase in new cases of type 1 diabetes worldwide. However, scientists and researchers have struggled to identify a direct cause. Many have questioned if changes in the environment or lifestyle have impacted the disease. In a newly released review paper published in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology, faculty from the Colorado School of Public Health at the Anschutz Medical Campus examined whether any environmental exposures can explain why type 1 diabetes is on the rise. (2020-01-31)

Drinking 1% rather than 2% milk accounts for 4.5 years of less aging in adults
A new study shows drinking low-fat milk -- both nonfat and 1% milk -- is significantly associated with less aging in adults. Research on 5,834 US adults by Brigham Young University exercise science professor Larry Tucker, Ph.D., found people who drink low-fat (1% and skim) milk experience several years less biological aging than those who drink high-fat (2% and whole) milk. (2020-01-15)

The claw disease tyloma is primarily genetic in cows
Scientists at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) and Georg August University Göttingen have succeeded in proving that a claw disease in cows is primarily genetic. Until now, the occurrence of interdigital hyperplasia has mostly been attributed to poor hygiene conditions in the barn. However, a team led by Professor Hermann Swalve discovered a farm in which the disease occurred frequently and was able to identify the gene responsible. As a result, the disease may now be contained through selective breeding. (2020-01-09)

New metabolic pathway discovered in rumen microbiome
Cows can adapt themselves to a fluctuating sodium content in their feed. How they do that was so far a secret. Researchers from Goethe University have now discovered a bacterium in the microbiome of the rumen which has a new type of cell respiration. (2020-01-08)

Study: Children who drank whole milk had lower risk of being overweight or obese
Research led by St. Michael's Hospital of Unity Health Toronto and published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition analyzed 28 studies from seven countries that explored the relationship between children drinking cow's milk and the risk of being overweight or obese. (2019-12-30)

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