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Current Magnet News and Events, Magnet News Articles.
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First high sensitivity dark matter axion hunting results from south Korea
IBS researchers raising their flag in the axion dark matter field. (2020-03-24)

Coronavirus testing kits to be developed using SFU-invented RNA imaging technology
Simon Fraser University researchers will use their pioneering imaging technology -- called Mango, for its bright color -- to develop coronavirus testing kits. They're among a small set of Canadian researchers who responded to the rapid funding opportunity recently announced by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) to help address COVID-19. (2020-03-19)

Magnetic component in e-cigarettes found to interfere with implantable cardioverter-defibrillator function
An e-cigarette carried in the left breast shirt pocket of a patient with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) caused magnetic reversion, interrupting the ICD's ability to detect and treat dangerous heart rhythm problems, clinicians report in HeartRhythm Case Reports, published by Elsevier. The patient was not aware that the e-cigarette has an integrated magnetic component, and it had suspended detection of heart rhythm problems by the ICD four times before he reported it to his healthcare team. (2020-03-16)

IKBFU Physicists keep improving 'smart' composites for biomedical sensors
The new composites are related to the multiferroic-class materials which have mutually controlled magnetic and electric properties. The effects observed in the compositions are considered to be a perspective platform for creating new devices from energy converters to highly sensitive sensors. (2020-03-10)

Hope for a new permanent magnet that's cheap and sustainable
Scientists have made a breakthrough in the search for a new, sustainable permanent magnet. (2020-03-03)

A current map for improving circuit design
The flow of an electrical current can be imaged directly using magnetic bubbles. (2020-03-02)

The magnet that didn't exist
In 1966, Japanese physicist Yosuke Nagaoka predicted the existence of a rather striking phenomenon: Nagaoka's ferromagnetism. His rigorous theory explains how materials can become magnetic, with one caveat: the specific conditions he described do not arise naturally in any material. Researchers from QuTech, a collaboration between TU Delft and TNO, have now observed experimental signatures of Nagaoka ferromagnetism using an engineered quantum system. The results were published today in Nature. (2020-03-02)

Cloud data speeds set to soar with aid of laser mini-magnets
Tiny, laser-activated magnets could enable cloud computing systems to process data up to 100 times faster than current technologies, a study suggests. (2020-03-02)

Improved work environments enhance patient and nurse satisfaction
Healthcare provider burnout is a mounting public health crisis with up to half of all physicians and one in three nurses reporting high burnout, data show. Burnout rates among nurses also correlate with lower patient satisfaction. While both factors are recognized, little is known about how effective interventions in nurse working conditions, managerial support, or resource enhancement can lessen burnout and improve patient satisfaction. (2020-03-02)

Study points to better medical diagnosis through levitating human blood
New research from the UBC's Okanagan campus, Harvard Medical School and Michigan State University suggests that levitating human plasma may lead to faster, more reliable, portable and simpler disease detection. The researchers used a stream of electricity that acted like a magnet and separated protein from blood plasma. Plasma is the clear, liquid portion of blood that remains after red blood cells, white blood cells, platelets and other cellular components are removed. (2020-02-19)

Not everything is ferromagnetic in high magnetic fields
High magnetic fields have a potential to modify the microscopic arrangement of magnetic moments because they overcome interactions existing in zero field. Usually, high fields exceeding a certain critical value force the moments to align in the same direction as the field leading to ferromagnetic arrangement. However, a recent study showed that this is not always the case. The experiments took place at the high-field magnet at HZB's neutron source BER II. (2020-02-10)

NASA analyzes ex-Tropical Cyclone Damien's rainfall in Western Australia
Tropical Cyclone Damien made landfall on Feb. 9 along the northern Pilbara coast of Western Australia. On Feb. 10, the GPM or Global Precipitation Measurement mission core satellite analyzed the rainfall generated by the remnants that triggered warnings. (2020-02-10)

Maglab scientists capture molecular maps of animal tissue with unprecedented detail
Scientists have refined a technique called mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) that translates reams of data into detailed visuals of the molecular makeup of biological samples. Their work, published this week in Analytical Chemistry, features images with mass resolution so high that every color in the image represents a distinct kind of molecule. (2020-01-23)

Space-time metasurface makes light reflect only in one direction
Breaking reciprocity is important in optical systems that require asymmetric flow of light, such as full-duplex communication systems and lasers. However, optical nonreciprocity is almost exclusively realized through magneto-optic materials that are incompatible with modern miniaturized photonic system. Researchers at the Pennsylvania State University have demonstrated nonreciprocal light reflection with multi-THz bandwidth based on metasurfaces with ultrafast spatiotemporal phase modulation. This approach highlights a potential way for creating compact and integratable nonreciprocal optical components. (2019-12-20)

Reflecting on the year in chemistry
A lot can happen in a year, especially when it comes to science. As 2019 draws to a close, Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, is highlighting the year's biggest stories in chemistry, top research trends and important developments in a special issue. In addition, the magazine makes some bold predictions for chemistry in 2020. (2019-12-18)

Simple experiment explains magnetic resonance
Physicists at University of California, Riverside, have designed an experiment to explain the concept of magnetic resonance. A versatile technique employed in chemistry, physics, and materials research, magnetic resonance describes a resonant excitation of electron or atomic nuclei spins residing in a magnetic field by means of electromagnetic waves. (2019-12-06)

Successful instrument guidance through deep and convoluted blood vessel networks
Researchers have developed a novel approach to tackling one of the biggest challenges of endovascular surgery: how to reach the most difficult-to-access physiological locations. Their solution is a robotic platform that uses the fringe field generated by the superconducting magnet of a clinical MRI scanner to guide medical instruments through deeper and more complex vascular structures. The approach has been successfully demonstrated in-vivo, and is the subject of an article just published in Science Robotics. (2019-12-03)

Superconducting wind turbine chalks up first test success
A superconducting rotor has been successfully tested on an active wind turbine for the first time. The EcoSwing consortium designed, developed, manufactured a full-size superconducting generator for a 3.6 megawatt wind turbine, and field-tested it in Thyborøn, Denmark. (2019-11-12)

Magnetic tuning at the nanoscale
Physicists from the German research center Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) are working to produce engineered magnetic nanostructures and to tailor material properties at the nanoscale. The scientists use a special microscope at the HZDR Ion Beam Center to achieve this goal. This microscope's ultrathin ion beam is capable of producing stable, periodically arranged nanomagnets in a sample material. The device can also be used to optimize the magnetic properties of carbon nanotubes. (2019-11-12)

Investigators build a better targeted drug therapy using the power of computation
Investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital set out to design more stable and predictable ADCs by using computer simulations to predict and plan out how the drug payload and antibody can stay linked to each other. (2019-11-08)

Science: Sensing magnetism in atomic resolution with just a scanning tunneling microscope
Scientists from the University of Strasbourg, France, in close collaboration with colleagues from the research centers in San Sebastián, Spain, and Jülich, Germany, have achieved a breakthrough in detecting the magnetic moments of nanoscale structures. They succeeded in making the magnetic moments visible with a resolution down to the atomic level using a scanning tunneling microscope, a device that has been standard in science for many years. (2019-11-04)

Intuitive in the virtual reality
Through the crafty use of magnetic fields, scientists from HZDR and Johannes Kepler University in Linz have developed the first electronic sensor that can simultaneously process both touchless and tactile stimuli. Prior attempts have so far failed to combine these functions on a single device due to overlapping signals of the various stimuli. As the sensor is readily applied to the human skin, it could provide a seamless interactive platform for virtual and augmented reality scenarios. (2019-10-29)

Newly created magnets are cheaper, more effective and 'smarter'
Ferromagnets, or more precisely, magnets -- are extremely demanded materials in modern electronics. The magnets present in almost every device -- TVs, computers, fridges, cars, smartphones, etc. But it is necessary to remember, that ferromagnetic alloys are made of rare-earth elements (REE) that is way an effective and high-powered magnet is an expensive thing. (2019-10-28)

A new way to turn heat into energy
An international team of scientists has figured out how to capture heat and turn it into electricity. The discovery, published last week in the journal Science Advances, could create more efficient energy generation from heat in things like car exhaust, interplanetary space probes and industrial processes. (2019-09-23)

Princeton physicists discover topological behavior of electrons in 3D magnetic material
Researchers explored a type of material in which the electrons behave according to the mathematical rules of topology. They found topological behaviors of electrons in a three-dimensional magnetic material at room temperature, opening new avenues of future study. (2019-09-19)

Fermilab achieves world-record field strength for accelerator magnet
Scientists at the Department of Energy's Fermilab have announced that they achieved the highest magnetic field strength ever recorded for an accelerator steering magnet, setting a world record of 14.1 teslas, with the magnet cooled to 4.5 kelvins or minus 450 degrees Fahrenheit. The previous record of 13.8 teslas, achieved at the same temperature, was held for 11 years by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. (2019-09-09)

Newfound superconductor material could be the 'silicon of quantum computers'
Newly discovered properties in the compound uranium ditelluride show that it could prove highly resistant to one of the nemeses of quantum computer development -- the difficulty with making such a computer's memory storage switches, called qubits, function long enough to finish a computation before losing the delicate physical relationship that allows them to operate as a group. This relationship, called quantum coherence, is hard to maintain because of disturbances from the surrounding world. (2019-08-15)

Scientists discover potential path to improving samarium-cobalt magnets
Scientists have discovered a potential tool to enhance magnetization and magnetic anisotropy, making it possible to improve the performance of samarium-cobalt magnets. (2019-08-13)

3D printed pill samples gut microbiome to aid diagnosis and treatment
A research team led by Tufts University engineers has developed a 3D printed pill that samples bacteria found in the gut -- known as the microbiome -- as it passes through the gastrointestinal tract (GI). The ability to profile bacterial species throughout the GI tract could have important implications for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases and conditions that are affected by the microbiome. (2019-07-24)

New laws of attraction: Scientists print magnetic liquid droplets
Scientists at Berkeley Lab have made a new material that is both liquid and magnetic, opening the door to a new area of science in magnetic soft matter. The new material could lead to a revolutionary class of printable liquid devices for a variety of applications from artificial cells that deliver targeted cancer therapies to flexible liquid robots that can change their shape to adapt to their surroundings. (2019-07-18)

Mastering a prickly problem in ferrofluids
Computer simulation accurately captures the beguiling motion of a liquid magnetic material. (2019-07-15)

Mini 'magic' MRI scanner could diagnose knee injuries more accurately
Researchers at Imperial College London have developed a prototype mini MRI scanner that fits around a patient's leg. (2019-06-28)

The observation of topologically protected magnetic quasiparticles
A team of researchers from Tohoku University, J-PARC, and Tokyo Institute of Technology conducted an in-depth study of magnetic quasiparticles called 'triplons.' The team conducted the study with a low-dimensional quantum magnet, Ba2CuSi2O6Cl2, using neutron inelastic scattering by AMATERAS at J-PARC. Their findings lead to the discovery of a new 'topologically protected triplon edge state' in the aforementioned compound. (2019-06-26)

A miniature robot that could check colons for early signs of disease
Engineers have shown it is technically possible to guide a tiny robotic capsule inside the colon to take micro-ultrasound images. Known as a Sonopill, the device could one day replace the need for patients to undergo an endoscopic examination, where a semi-rigid scope is passed into the bowel - an invasive procedure that can be painful. (2019-06-19)

Magnetism: An unexpected push for the hydrogen economy
For the first time, scientists have applied a magnetic field that directly enhanced the production of hydrogen via water splitting. The results have been published in Nature Energy. The simplicity of the discovery opens opportunities for implementing magnetic enhancement in water splitting, bringing the hydrogen-based economy closer. The catalysts use earth-abundant elements and avoid the use of critical elements. The inherent magnetism of the catalysts avoids the use of binders to adhere them to physical support. (2019-06-10)

Moving the needle on nanoscale imaging with single-molecule magnets
Amid intense research focus on magnetic single atoms and molecules -- which could serve as the smallest possible memory elements in quantum computing -- researchers report creating a sensor capable of measuring and imaging magnetic structures and interactions at the atomic scale, in unprecedented detail. (2019-05-16)

Energy-free superfast computing invented by scientists using light pulses
The invention uses magnets to record computer data which consume virtually zero energy, solving the dilemma of how to create faster data processing speeds without high energy costs. Today's data center servers consume between 2 to 5% of global electricity consumption, producing heat which needs more power to cool the servers. The problem is so acute services in the ocean in an effort to keep them cool and cut costs. (2019-05-15)

Magnets can help AI get closer to the efficiency of the human brain
Purdue University researchers have developed a process to use magnetics with brain-like networks to program and teach devices such as personal robots, self-driving cars and drones to better generalize about different objects. (2019-04-25)

Singapore scientists develop swallowable self-inflating capsule to help tackle obesity
A team of scientists from NTU Singapore and NUHS has developed a self-inflating weight management capsule that could help battle obesity, and be an alternative to intragastric balloons. The prototype capsule contains a balloon that can be self-inflated with a handheld magnet once it is in the stomach, thus inducing a sense of fullness. (2019-04-24)

Lasers make magnets behave like fluids
Researchers have discovered how magnets recover after being blasted by a laser. It turns out, they act a bit like oil and water in a jar. (2019-04-18)

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