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Current Magnetic Resonance Imaging News and Events, Magnetic Resonance Imaging News Articles.
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Traumatic stress in childhood can lead to brain changes in adulthood: study
A new study has shown that traumatic or stressful events in childhood may lead to tiny changes in key brain structures that can now be identified decades later. The study is the first to show that trauma or maltreatment during a child's early years--a well-known risk factor for developing mental health conditions such as major depressive disorder in adulthood--triggers changes in specific subregions of the amygdala and the hippocampus. (2021-02-09)

Physicists finesse the storing of light to create rainbows of colour
Physicists at the University of Bath have found a way to use resonance to harness the energy of light more effectively inside microresonators. (2021-02-09)

AD diagnostics could become more accessible
A team of researchers from the Laboratory of Biophysics at NUST MISIS, Lomonosov Moscow State University and D. Mendeleev University of Chemical Technology of Russia has summarized metal-containing diagnostic agents for positron emission tomography (PET), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging of Alzheimer's disease (AD). According to the researchers, their use could improve access to diagnostic imaging of AD among the risk groups. (2021-02-09)

Scientists suggested using non-symmetrical magnets for target drug delivery
A team of scientists from Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University and the University of Genoa suggested combining permanent magnets of different shapes to target magnetic particles with drugs at the organs of lab mice. Such a combination secured a magnetic driving force that was ten times stronger compared to regular cylindrical magnets. (2021-02-09)

Quantum computing enables simulations to unravel mysteries of magnetic materials
A multi-institutional team became the first to generate accurate results from materials science simulations on a quantum computer that can be verified with neutron scattering experiments and other practical techniques. (2021-02-09)

Super-Earth atmospheres probed at Sandia's Z machine
Sandia National Laboratorie' Z machine has replicated the gravitational pressures on so-called ''super-Earths'' to determine which might maintain atmospheres that could support life. Astronomers believe that super-Earths -- collections of rocks up to eight times larger than Earth -- exist in the millions in our galaxy. ''The question before us is whether any of these super planets are actually Earthlike, with active geological processes, atmospheres and magnetic fields,'' said Sandia physicist Joshua Townsend. The researchers found seven. (2021-02-09)

Scientists create flexible biocompatible cilia that can be controlled by a magnet
Filaments made of polymer-coated iron oxide nanoparticles are obtained by exposing the material to a magnetic field under controlled temperature. The applications are myriad and include transporting substances into cells or directing fluids. (2021-02-09)

Type 2 diabetes: drugs initially increase glucose production
Although SGLT-2 inhibitors are central to the treatment of diabetes, their exact mode of action was hitherto unknown. A study shows that there is a direct correlation between the elimination of glucose via the kidneys and new glucose production in the liver. (2021-02-08)

Researchers produce tiny nanoparticles and reveal their inner structure for the first time
Tiny nanoparticles can be furnished with dyes and could be used for new imaging techniques, as chemists and physicists at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) show in a recent study. The researchers have also been the first to fully determine the particles' internal structure. Their results were published in the renowned journal Angewandte Chemie. (2021-02-08)

Machine learning could aid mental health diagnoses
A way of using machine learning to more accurately identify patients with a mix of psychotic and depressive symptoms has been developed by researchers at the University of Birmingham. (2021-02-08)

A magnetic twist to graphene
By combining ferromagnets and two rotated layers of graphene, researchers open up a new platform for strongly interacting states using graphene's unique quantum degree of freedom. (2021-02-08)

'Magnetic graphene' forms a new kind of magnetism
Researchers have identified a new form of magnetism in so-called magnetic graphene, which could point the way toward understanding superconductivity in this unusual type of material. (2021-02-08)

Synchronization of brain hemispheres changes what we hear
Most of the time, our brain receives different input from each of our ears, but we nevertheless perceive speech as unified sounds. This process takes place through synchronization of the areas of the brain involved with the help of gamma waves, neurolinguists at the University of Zurich have now discovered. Their findings may lead to new treatment approaches for tinnitus. (2021-02-08)

Researchers find a way to increase spatial resolution in brain activity visualization
Researchers from the HSE Institute for Cognitive Neuroscience have proposed a new method to process magnetoencephalography (MEG) data, which helps find cortical activation areas with higher precision. The method can be used in both basic research and clinical practice to diagnose a wide range of neurological disorders and to prepare patients for brain surgery. The paper describing the algorithm was published in the journal NeuroImage. (2021-02-05)

New microscopy concept enters into force
The first demonstration of an approach that inverts the standard paradigm of scanning probe microscopy raises the prospect of force sensing at the fundamental limit. (2021-02-05)

Researchers from NUS create 'whirling' nano-structures in anti-ferromagnets
Inspired by the Big Bang cooling, the new finding could lead to super-fast, energy-efficient memory chips. (2021-02-04)

Book developed at Cincinnati Children's helps identify risks of reading difficulties
A study published in the journal Pediatrics expands validation evidence for a new screening tool that directly engages preschool-age children during clinic visits to assess their early literacy skills. The tool, which is the first of its kind, has the potential to identify reading difficulties as early as possible, target interventions and empower families to help their child at home, according to researchers at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center. (2021-02-04)

Clinical trial: Using MRI for prostate cancer diagnosis equals or beats current standard
The results of a Phase III randomized clinical trial have shown that when it comes to detecting clinically significant prostate cancer, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) with targeted biopsies (MRI-TBx) matches the current standard and brings a multitude of advantages. The PRostate Evaluation for Clinically Important Disease: MRI vs Standard Evaluation Procedures (PRECISE) study will help to make prostate cancer diagnosis more accurate and less invasive. (2021-02-04)

'Where did I park my car?' Brain stimulation improves mental time travel
A new Northwestern Medicine study improved memory of complex, realistic events similar to these by applying transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to the brain network responsible for memory. The authors then had participants watch videos of realistic activities to measure how memory works during everyday tasks. The findings prove it is possible to measure and manipulate realistic types of memory. (2021-02-04)

Best of both worlds: A hybrid method for tracking laparoscopic ultrasound transducers
In a recent study published in the Journal of Medical Imaging, a team of scientists from the US have come up with a creative solution. Instead of relying entirely on either hardware- or CV-based tracking, they propose a hybrid approach that combines both methods. (2021-02-04)

An optical coating like no other
The technology, based on Fano resonance, results in a coating that fully reflects only a very narrow wavelength. The technology could improve the effectiveness of devices that use hybrid thermal-electric power generation as a solar energy option. (2021-02-04)

On the dot: Novel quantum sensor provides new approach to early diagnosis via imaging
A phenomenon called 'oxidative stress' is seen in affected organs during the early stages of certain difficult-to-treat diseases like cancer and kidney dysfunction. Detecting oxidative stress could thus enable early diagnosis and preventive treatments. But, the in vivo measurement of oxidative stress caused by both oxidation and reduction has historically been difficult. Now, scientists have developed an advanced quantum sensor technology that can detect 'oxidative stress' non-invasively throughout the body using fluorescent imaging and MRI. (2021-02-03)

Venus flytraps found to produce magnetic fields
The Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula) is a carnivorous plant that encloses its prey using modified leaves as a trap. During this process, electrical signals known as action potentials trigger the closure of the leaf lobes. An interdisciplinary team of scientists has now shown that these electrical signals generate measurable magnetic fields. (2021-02-02)

Supersaturation: The barrier between protein folding and misfolding
It's commonly accepted that protein folding/misfolding are alternative reactions of unfolded proteins but the principles governing this remain unknown. Here, researchers from Osaka University describe a general concept that links protein folding and misfolding: protein folding and amyloid formation are separated by the supersaturation barrier of a denatured protein. Breakdown of this supersaturation barrier is required to shift the protein to the amyloid pathway, linking Anfinsen's intramolecular folding universe with the ''outer'' intermolecular misfolding universe. (2021-02-01)

Skoltech imaging resources used in international experiment with new photocatalysts
Skoltech researchers helped their colleagues from Japan, Germany, the United States, and China study the crystal structure and optical properties of a new class of two-dimensional compounds, which can be used as effective visible-light-responsive photocatalysts for energy and chemical conversion. They used the Advanced Imaging Core Facility equipment for imaging and structural analysis. (2021-02-01)

Double delight: New synthetic transmembrane ion channel can be activated in two ways
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) and University of Tokyo, Japan, have, for the first time, synthesized a novel artificial transmembrane ion channel--modelled on a naturally found transmembrane channel involved in neuron signaling--that responds to both chemical and electrical stimuli. Given its overall properties, this artificial channel opens doors to novel fundamental research into cellular transport and signaling, new possibilities in drug development, and the potential for new types of biosensors. (2021-02-01)

Mysterious magnetic fossils offer past climate clues
There are fossils, found in ancient marine sediments and made up of no more than a few magnetic nanoparticles, that can tell us a whole lot about the climate of the past, especially episodes of abrupt global warming. Now, researchers have found a way to glean the valuable information in those fossils without having to crush the scarce samples into a fine powder. (2021-02-01)

Astronomers spot bizarre activity from one of the strongest magnets in the Universe
Astronomers from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Gravitational Wave Discovery (OzGrav) and CSIRO have just observed bizarre, never-seen-before behaviour from a 'radio-loud' magnetar--a rare type of neutron star and one of the strongest magnets in the Universe. Their new findings, published today in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (MNRAS), suggest magnetars have more complex magnetic fields than previously thought - which may challenge theories of how they are born and evolve over time. (2021-02-01)

High-speed holographic fluorescence microscopy system with submicron resolution
The National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT), Tohoku University, Toin University of Yokohama, and Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST) have succeeded in developing a scanless high-speed holographic fluorescence microscopy system with submicron resolution for a 3D space. The system is based on digital holography. The developed microscopy system has an algorithm to acquire 3D information of fluorescent objects toward scanless 3D measurement in less than 1 millisecond. (2021-01-29)

New ion trap to create the world's most accurate mass spectrometer
Mass spectrometers are widely used to analyze highly complex chemical and biological mixtures. Skoltech scientists have developed a new version of a mass spectrometer that uses rotation frequencies of ionized molecules in strong magnetic fields to measure masses with higher accuracy (FT ICR). The team has designed an ion trap that ensures the utmost resolving power in ultra-strong magnetic fields. (2021-01-28)

New concept for rocket thruster exploits the mechanism behind solar flares
A new type of rocket thruster that could take humankind to Mars and beyond has been proposed by a physicist at PPPL. The device would apply magnetic fields to cause particles of plasma to shoot out the back of a rocket and propel the craft forward. (2021-01-28)

Secrets of traumatic stress hidden in the brain are exposed
Study explores lateralization changes in resting state brain network functional connectivity. Among military service members and Veterans with symptoms of traumatic stress, asymmetries of network and brain region connectivity patterns were identified prior to usage of HIRREM. A variety of changes in lateralized patterns of brain connectivity were identified post intervention. These laterality findings may inform future studies of brain connectivity in traumatic stress disorders, with potential to point to mechanisms of action for successful intervention. (2021-01-27)

Unlocking PTSD: New study reveals why trauma-focused psychotherapy treatment works
MEDIA: Trauma-focused psychotherapy is the best-known treatment for PTSD. But how does it work? Dell Med researcher Greg Fonzo says he may have found the answer by exploring how different parts of the brain talk to one another. (2021-01-27)

Beckman Institute MRI expertise aids research on hemodialysis therapy patients
Beckman Institute researchers at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign used a nonstandard magnetic resonance imaging to evaluate patients' response to a strategy to aid those with kidney failure undergoing hemodialysis therapy. (2021-01-27)

'Brain training' may be an effective treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder
Neurofeedback, also called 'brain training,' consists of exercises where individuals regulate their own brain activity. In a new study, researchers have found that neurofeedback may be an effective treatment for individuals with post-traumatic stress disorder. (2021-01-26)

AI used to predict early symptoms of schizophrenia in relatives of patients
University of Alberta researchers have taken a step forward in developing an artificial intelligence tool to predict schizophrenia by analyzing brain scans. In recently published research, the tool was used to analyze functional magnetic resonance images of 57 healthy first-degree relatives (siblings or children) of schizophrenia patients. It accurately identified the 14 individuals who scored highest on a self-reported schizotypal personality trait scale. (2021-01-26)

White turns into (extreme-)ultraviolet
Researchers from the Max Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy (MBI) have developed a new method to modify the spectral width of extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) light. By employing a novel phase-matching scheme in four-wave mixing, they could compress the spectral width of the initial broadband light by more than hundred times. The detailed experimental and theoretical results have been published in Nature Photonics. (2021-01-25)

First observation of the early link between proteins linked to Alzheimer's disease
Study conducted by researchers from the GIGA CRC In vivo Imaging laboratory at ULi├Ęge demonstrates, for the first time in humans, how the first deposits of tau proteins in the brainstem are associated with neurophysiological processes specific to the early stages of Alzheimer's disease development. (2021-01-25)

Special Issue, Volume 10 of Inter Faculty - Resonance
The Special Issue, Volume 10, of Inter Faculty takes up the theme of resonance in the context of the Covid-19 pandemic and its ensuing societal shifts. It brings together different perspectives from a broad spectrum of researchers from the Human and Social Sciences, placing the individual studies within the wider consideration of a critical turning point for humankind in relation to the natural world. (2021-01-25)

MRI helps unravel the mysteries of sleep
Scientists at EPFL and the Universities of Geneva, Cape Town and Bochum have joined forces to investigate brain activity during sleep with the help of MRI scans. It turns out our brains are much more active than we thought. (2021-01-22)

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