Current Magnetic Resonance Imaging News and Events | Page 25

Current Magnetic Resonance Imaging News and Events, Magnetic Resonance Imaging News Articles.
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For low back pain in older adults, treatment doesn't match guidelines
Many Medicare patients with new episodes of low back pain receive care inconsistent with current guidelines -- including high use of opioids and advanced imaging tests, reports a study in the February issue of Medical Care. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer. (2020-01-23)

Researchers expand microchip capability with new 3D inductor technology
Smaller is better when it comes to microchips, researchers said, and by using 3D components on a standardized 2D microchip manufacturing platform, developers can use up to 100 times less chip space. A team of engineers has boosted the performance of its previously developed 3D inductor technology by adding as much as three orders of magnitudes more induction to meet the performance demands of modern electronic devices. (2020-01-23)

Maglab scientists capture molecular maps of animal tissue with unprecedented detail
Scientists have refined a technique called mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) that translates reams of data into detailed visuals of the molecular makeup of biological samples. Their work, published this week in Analytical Chemistry, features images with mass resolution so high that every color in the image represents a distinct kind of molecule. (2020-01-23)

PET/MRI identifies notable breast cancer imaging biomarkers
Researchers have identified several potentially useful breast cancer biomarkers that indicate the presence and risk of malignancy, according to new research published in The Journal of Nuclear Medicine. (2020-01-22)

A new approach to reveal the multiple structures of RNA
The key of the extraordinary functionality of ribonucleic acid, better known as RNA, is a highly flexible and dynamic structure. Yet, the experimental characterisation of its different configurations is rather complex. A study conducted by SISSA and published on Nucleic Acids Research combines experimental data and molecular dynamics simulations to reconstruct the different dominant and minority structures of a single RNA fragment, providing an innovative method to study highly dynamic molecular systems. (2020-01-22)

Both simple and advanced imaging can predict best stroke patients for thrombectomy
Both simple and advanced computed tomography (CT) were effective in accurately predicting which stroke patients would benefit from endovascular thrombectomy to remove a large cerebral clot, but together they were even better, reported researchers at McGovern Medical School at UTHealth in Houston. Results were published in the Annals of Neurology. (2020-01-22)

Integrate micro chips for electronic skin
Researchers from Dresden and Osaka present the first fully integrated flexible electronics made of magnetic sensors and organic circuits which opens the path towards the development of electronic skin. (2020-01-22)

Traumatic brain injury impairs hormone production, disrupting sleep, cognition, memory
The team has learned more about how a TBI triggers a reduction in growth hormone secretion and why most TBI patients improve after growth hormone replacement treatment. (2020-01-21)

Low power metal detector senses magnetic fingerprints
Recent studies have shown metallic objects have their own magnetic fingerprints based on size, shape and physical composition. In AIP Advances, from AIP Publishing, scientists look to leverage these observations to potentially create a smaller and cheaper system that is just as effective as their larger counterparts. (2020-01-21)

Determining the atomic structure of natural products more rapidly and accurately
Many drugs are derived from natural products. But before natural products can be exploited, chemists must first determine their structure and stereochemistry. This can be a major challenge, particularly when the molecules cannot be crystallized and contain only few hydrogen atoms. A new NMR-based method, developed at the Leibniz-Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP), now simplifies the analysis and produces more accurate results. The work has been published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society. (2020-01-21)

New research uses physiological cues to distinguish computer-generated faces from human ones
Recent advances in computer graphics are making it possible to create computer-generated (CG) representations of human beings that are difficult to distinguish from their real-world counterparts. 'Digital human face detection in video sequences via a physiological signal analysis,' a paper published today in the Journal of Electronic Imaging (JEI), presents a viable, innovative way to discern between natural humans (NAT) and CG faces within the context of multimedia forensics, using individuals' heart rate as the discriminating feature. (2020-01-21)

Ultrafast camera takes 1 trillion frames per second of transparent objects and phenomena
Caltech's Lihong Wang has adapted his picosecond imaging technology to take pictures and video of transparent objects like cells and phenomena like shockwaves. (2020-01-21)

New research provides evidence of strong early magnetic field around Earth
New research from the University of Rochester provides evidence that the magnetic field that first formed around Earth was even stronger than scientists previously believed. The research will help scientists draw conclusions about the sustainability of Earth's magnetic shield and whether or not there are other planets in the solar system with the conditions necessary to harbor life. (2020-01-20)

Smart materials are becoming smarter
Composites are a new type of materials that consist of heterogeneous components (metals, ceramics, glass, plastic, carbon, etc.) and combine their properties. To create such a material, a filler with certain stability and rigidity is placed into a flexible matrix. Various compositions and matrix-filler ratios create a wide range of materials with given sets of characteristics. (2020-01-20)

Magnetic nanomaterials become an effective treatment against liver fibrosis
Fibrosis may affect different body organs. It develops as a reaction to long-time inflammation and is supposed to isolate the inflammation site from surrounding tissues. For example, chronic liver fibrosis may occur if the liver is constantly influenced by toxins, viruses, or metabolic disturbances. Liver damage is caused by the hepatocytes death, the main type of liver cells that secure the functioning of the organ. (2020-01-20)

Brain activity patterns linked with improved learning and memory in multiple sclerosis
'The decreased brain activation seen in this study may be a sign of more efficient processing after treatment,' said Dr. Boukrina. 'At baseline, individuals with MS often show hyperactivation during cognitive tasks which may be a necessary compensation in order to complete the task. After treatment, the task becomes less demanding, and this may account for the reduction in activation.' Identifying the brain regions associated with improvements in learning and memory may foster investigation into other modalities that may augment this effect on activation. (2020-01-20)

Rich rewards: Scientists reveal ADHD medication's effect on the brain
Researchers at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) have identified how certain areas of the human brain respond to methylphenidate -- a stimulant drug which is used to treat symptoms of ADHD. The work may help researchers understand the precise mechanism of the drug and ultimately develop more targeted medicines for the condition. (2020-01-17)

Artificial intelligence to improve resolution of brain magnetic resonance imaging
Researchers of the ICAI Group -Computational Intelligence and Image Analysis- of the University of Malaga (UMA) have designed an unprecedented method that is capable of improving brain images obtained through magnetic resonance imaging using artificial intelligence. (2020-01-17)

NJIT scientists measure the evolving energy of a solar flare's explosive first minutes
In 2017, a massive new region of magnetic field erupted on the sun's surface next to an existing sunspot. The powerful collision of magnetic energy produced a series of solar flares, causing turbulent space weather conditions at Earth. Scientists have now pinpointed for the first time exactly when and where the explosion released the energy that heated spewing plasma to energies equivalent to 1 billion degrees in temperature. (2020-01-17)

Walking with atoms -- chemical bond making and breaking recorded in action
Scientists have for the first time captured and filmed atoms bonding together, using advanced microscopy methods they captured a moment that is around half a million times smaller than the width of a human hair. (2020-01-17)

Deep learning enables real-time imaging around corners
Researchers have harnessed the power of a type of artificial intelligence known as deep learning to create a new laser-based system that can image around corners in real time. With further development, the system might let self-driving cars 'look' around parked cars or busy intersections to see hazards or pedestrians. (2020-01-16)

What's MER? A new way to measure quantum materials
Experimental physicists have combined several measurements of quantum materials into one in their ongoing quest to learn more about manipulating and controlling the behavior of them for possible applications. They even coined a term for it -- magneto-elastoresistance, or MER. (2020-01-16)

Spinning quantum dots
A new paper in EPJ B presents a theoretical analysis of electron spins in moving semiconductor quantum dots, showing how these can be controlled by electric fields in a way that suggests they may be usable as information storage and processing components of quantum computers. (2020-01-15)

Room-temperature multiferroicity in 2D ultrathin-layers and diversified magnetoelectric couplings
The coexistence of vertical ferroelectricity and ferromagnetism with both Curie temperatures above room-temperature is predicted in ultrathin-layer CuCrS2 and CuCrSe2.A considerable net magnetization can be reversed upon a ferroelectric switching, where the change in spin-resolved band structure also renders efficient ''magnetic reading + electrical writing''. The thickness-different layers may even exhibit diversified types of magnetoelectric coupling. (2020-01-14)

Final images from Cassini spacecraft
Researchers are busy analysing some of the final data sent back from the Cassini spacecraft which has been in orbit around Saturn for more than 13 years until the end of its mission in September 2017. For the last leg of its journey, Cassini was put on a particularly daring orbit passing between Saturn and its rings which brought it closer to Saturn than ever before, allowing scientists to obtain images of Saturn's ultraviolet auroras in unprecedented resolution. (2020-01-14)

Brain model offers new insights into damage caused by stroke and other injuries
A UB researcher has developed a computer model of the human brain that more realistically simulates actual patterns of brain impairment than existing methods. The novel advancement creates a digital simulation environment that could help stroke victims and patients with other brain injuries by serving as a testing ground for hypotheses about specific neurological damage. (2020-01-14)

Bacteria shredding tech to fight drug-resistant superbugs
New technology uses nano-sized particles of magnetic liquid metal to shred bacteria and bacterial biofilm. The research offers a groundbreaking new direction in the search for solutions to the deadly problem of antibiotic resistance. (2020-01-13)

When pregnant moms are stressed out, babies' brains suffer
Knowing that your unborn fetus has congenital heart disease causes such pronounced maternal stress, anxiety and depression that these women's fetuses end up with impaired development in key brain regions before they are born, according to research published online Jan. 13, 2020, in JAMA Pediatrics. (2020-01-13)

Connecting the dots in the migraine brain
This dMRI study pointed to the structural strengthening of connections involving subcortical regions associated with pain processing and weakening in connections involving cortical regions associated with hyperexcitability may coexist in migraine. Also, migraine attacks may impose plastic adaptations in the brain. (2020-01-13)

Calculated surprise leads to groundbreaking discovery in cognitive control research
To better understand how motivational control processes help maximize performance when faced with task challenges, researchers used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and provide fascinating insights into the role of the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) as a component network of brain regions that support motivated behavior. They have unified conflicting findings by discovering that the single mechanism of surprise best accounts for activity in dACC during a task requiring motivated control. (2020-01-13)

Man versus machine: Can AI do science?
A team of scientists based at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST), the University of Munich and the CNRS at the University of Bordeaux have shown that machines can beat theoretical physicists at their own game, solving complex problems just as accurately as scientists, but considerably faster. (2020-01-13)

Losing tongue fat improves sleep apnea
Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to measure the effect of weight loss on the upper airway in obese patients, researchers found that reducing tongue fat is a primary factor in lessening the severity of OSA. (2020-01-10)

Chromatin organizes itself into 3D 'forests' in single cells
Scientists are increasingly interested in the function of chromatin -- a mix of DNA and protein within chromosomes -- and its role in disease. Using mathematical modeling and optical imaging they developed themselves, Northwestern University researchers now have discovered how chromatin folds at the single-cell level. They found it folds into a variety of tree-like domains spaced along a chromatin backbone. These small and large areas are like a mixed forest of trees growing from the forest floor. (2020-01-10)

Peering into the genome of brain tumor
Scientists at Osaka University have created a machine learning method for classifying the mutations of glioma brain tumors based on MR images alone. Thus far, classification has only been possible by tissue sampling during surgery. The new method is noninvasive, may remove the need for a tissue sample and help accelerate delivery of treatment for patients. (2020-01-09)

Baby and adult brains 'sync up' during play, finds Princeton Baby Lab
A team of Princeton researchers has conducted the first study of how baby and adult brains interact during natural play, and they found measurable connections in their neural activity. In other words, baby and adult brain activity rose and fell together as they shared toys and eye contact. The research was conducted at the Princeton Baby Lab, where University researchers study how babies learn to see, talk and understand the world. (2020-01-09)

Future patient care at risk unless health research protected and boosted
Health research faces a crisis that could impact on patient care, says a new report led by 10 prominent figures in the NHS and academia. (2020-01-08)

Experiments into amorphous carbon monolayer lend new evidence to physics debate
A new study into two-dimensional amorphous carbon is providing answers to long-standing questions regarding the atomic makeup of bulk amorphous materials, opening the door to exciting device possibilities in the future. (2020-01-08)

False negatives: Delayed Zika effects in babies who appeared normal at birth
Colombian infants exposed to Zika virus in the womb showed neurodevelopmental delays as toddlers, despite having 'normal' brain imaging and head circumference at birth, a finding that underscores the importance of long-term neurodevelopmental follow-up for Zika-exposed infants, according to a cohort study published online Jan. 6, 2020, in JAMA Pediatrics. (2020-01-06)

Moving domain walls induce losses in superconductor/ferromagnet hybrid systems
Physicist have shown that the motion of domain walls can be detected by monitoring voltage generated in superconducting devices. This finding can facilitate magnetic racetrack memory applications. The result was published in Physical Review Letters -publication. The international research group included researcher from the University of Jyväskylä. (2020-01-06)

Want to turn back time? Try running a marathon
The new year means it's time to set resolutions for 2020 and new research from the Journal of the American College of Cardiology suggests running a marathon for the first time could have several health benefits. The study found that for first-time marathon runners, training and completion of the marathon was associated with reductions in blood pressure and aortic stiffening in healthy participants that were equivalent to a four-year reduction in vascular age. (2020-01-06)

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