Current Magnetism News and Events

Current Magnetism News and Events, Magnetism News Articles.
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Scientists manipulate magnets at the atomic scale
Fast and energy-efficient future data processing technologies are on the horizon after an international team of scientists successfully manipulated magnets at the atomic level. Physicist Dr Rostislav Mikhaylovskiy from Lancaster University said: ''With stalling efficiency trends of current technology, new scientific approaches are especially valuable. Our discovery of the atomically-driven ultrafast control of magnetism opens broad avenues for fast and energy-efficient future data processing technologies essential to keep up with our data hunger.'' (2021-02-12)

A new way of forming planets
Scientists of the Universities of Zurich and Cambridge, associated with the Swiss National Centre of Competence in Research PlanetS, suggest a new explanation for the abundance in intermediate-mass exoplanets - a long-standing puzzle of Astronomy. (2021-02-11)

'Magnetic graphene' forms a new kind of magnetism
Researchers have identified a new form of magnetism in so-called magnetic graphene, which could point the way toward understanding superconductivity in this unusual type of material. (2021-02-08)

USTC develops ultrahigh-performance plasmonic metal-oxide materials
In a study published in Advanced Materials, the researchers from Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at the Microscale, the University of Science and Technology of China of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, using an electron-proton co-doping strategy, invented a new metal-like semiconductor material with excellent plasmonic resonance performance. (2021-01-08)

Physicists observe competition between magnetic orders
Two-dimensional materials, consisting of a single layer of atoms, have been booming in research for years. They possess novel properties that can only be explained with the help of the laws of quantum mechanics. Researchers have now used ultracold atoms to gain new insights into previously unknown quantum phenomena. They found out that the magnetic orders between two coupled thin films of atoms compete with each other. The study has been published in Nature. (2021-01-06)

Theory describes quantum phenomenon in nanomaterials
Theoretical physicists Yoshimichi Teratani and Akira Oguri of Osaka City University, and Rui Sakano of the University of Tokyo have developed mathematical formulas that describe a physical phenomenon happening within quantum dots and other nanosized materials. The formulas, published in the journal Physical Review Letters, could be applied to further theoretical research about the physics of quantum dots, ultra-cold atomic gasses, and quarks. (2020-12-23)

New topological properties found in "old" material of Cobalt disulfide
Researchers working with the Schoop Lab discovered the presence of Weyl nodes in bulk CoS2 that allow them to make predictions about its surface properties. The material hosts Weyl-fermions and Fermi-arc surface states within its band structure, which may enable it to serve as a platform for exotic phenomena. (2020-12-18)

Ultracold atoms reveal a new type of quantum magnetic behavior
An MIT experiment with ultracold atoms reveals new quantum magnetic behavior that may help in design of spintronic devices and magnetic materials. (2020-12-16)

Electrons falling flat: Germanium falls into a 2D arrangement on zirconium diboride
Scientists have recently revealed, both theoretically and experimentally, that germanium atoms can arrange themselves into a 2D 'bitriangular' lattice on zirconium diboride thin films grown on germanium single crystals to form a 'flat band material' with an embedded 'kagome' lattice. The result provides experimental support to a theoretical prediction of flat bands emerging from trivial atomic geometry and indicates the possibility of their existence in many more materials. (2020-12-04)

Rochester researchers uncover key clues about the solar system's history
Researchers have used magnetism to determine, for the first time, when asteroids that are rich in water and amino acids first arrived in the inner solar system. (2020-12-04)

Scientists develop a magnetic switch with lower energy consumption
Joint research conducted by the UAB has shown the ability to switch magnetizacion « on » and « off » using voltage in a new class of easy-to-fabricate materials containing nitrogen. These results, published in Nature Communications, may be used to reduce energy consumption in electronic technologies. (2020-11-18)

Connecting two classes of unconventional superconductors
The understanding of unconventional superconductivity is one of the most challenging and fascinating tasks of solid-state physics. Different classes of unconventional superconductors share that superconductivity emerges near a magnetic phase despite the underlying physics is different. (2020-11-11)

Electrified magnets: researchers uncover a new way to handle data
The properties of synthesised magnets can be changed and controlled by charge currents as suggested by a study and simulations conducted by physicists at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) and Central South University in China. In the journal 'Nature Communications', the team reports on how magnets and magnetic signals can be coupled more effectively and steered by electric fields. This could result in new, environmentally friendly concepts for efficient communication and data processing. (2020-11-09)

A new candidate material for quantum spin liquids
Using a unique material, EPFL scientists have been able to design and study an unusual state of matter, the Quantum Spin Liquid. The work has significant implications for future technologies, from quantum computing to superconductivity and spintronics. (2020-11-06)

Reviewing multiferroics for future, low-energy data storage
Big data and exponential demands for computations are driving an unsustainable rise in global ICT energy use. A new UNSW study reviews the use of the 'multiferroic' material bismuth-ferrite, which allows for low-energy switching in data storage devices and could be applied in a future generation of ultra-low-energy electronics. (2020-10-22)

Stacking and twisting graphene unlocks a rare form of magnetism
A team of researchers at Columbia University and the University of Washington has discovered that a variety of exotic electronic states, including a rare form of magnetism, can arise in a three-layer graphene structure. (2020-10-12)

Finding the right colour to control magnets with laser pulses
Scientists have discovered a new way to manipulate magnets with laser light pulses shorter than a trillionth of a second. The international team of researchers, led by Lancaster and Radboud Universities, also identified the light wavelength or colour which enables the most efficient manipulation. The finding is published in Physical Review Letters. (2020-10-12)

First observation of nutation in magnetic materials
An international team of scientists has managed for the first time to observe the 'nutation' of spins in magnetic materials (the oscillations of their axis during precession). The measured nutation period was of the order of one picosecond. The discovery was published by Nature Physics (2020-09-29)

Bridging the gap between the magnetic and electronic properties of topological insulators
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology shed light on the relationship between the magnetic properties of topological insulators and their electronic band structure. Their experimental results shed new insights into recent debates regarding the evolution of the band structure with temperature in these materials, which exhibit unusual quantum phenomena and are envisioned to be crucial in next-generation electronics, spintronics, and quantum computers. (2020-09-24)

Ultra-fast magnetic switching with potential to transform fibre optical communications
Researchers have discovered that a new material can act as a super-fast magnetic switch. When struck by successive ultra-short laser pulses it exhibits 'toggle switching' that could increase the capacity of the global fibre optic cable network by an order of magnitude. (2020-09-15)

Evergreen needles act as air quality monitors
Every tree, even an evergreen, can be an air quality monitor. That's the conclusion of researchers at the University of Utah who measured the magnetism of particulate matter on the needles of evergreen trees on the U campus. That measurement, they found, correlated to general air quality, suggesting that analysis of the needles -- a relatively simple and low-cost process -- could provide a high-resolution, year-round picture of air quality. (2020-09-15)

Physicists discover new magnetoelectric effect
A special material was found, which shows a surprising new effect: Its electrical properties can be controlled with a magnetic field. This effect works completely differently than usual. It can be controlled in a highly sensitive way. (2020-09-14)

Quirky response to magnetism presents quantum physics mystery
In a new study just published and highlighted as an Editor's Suggestion in Physical Review Letters, scientists describe the quirky behavior of one such magnetic topological insulator. The paper includes experimental evidence that intrinsic magnetism in the bulk of manganese bismuth telluride (MnBi2Te4) also extends to the electrons on its electrically conductive surface. Such materials could be just right for making qubits, but this one doesn't obey the rules. (2020-09-10)

New method to track ultrafast change of magnetic state
An international team of physicists from Bielefeld University, Uppsala University, the University of Strasbourg, University of Shanghai for Science and Technology, Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, ETH Zurich, and the Free University Berlin have developed a precise method to measure the ultrafast change of a magnetic state in materials. Their study, titled 'Ultrafast terahertz magnetometry', has been published today (25.08.2020) in Nature Communications. (2020-08-25)

Global magnetic field of the solar corona measured for the first time
An international team led by Professor Tian Hui from Peking University has recently measured the global magnetic field of the solar corona for the first time. The team used observations from the Coronal Multi-channel Polarimeter, an instrument designed by Dr. Steve Tomczyk at the National Center for Atmospheric Research, USA. (2020-08-25)

Researchers measure the global magnetic field in solar corona for the first time
An international team led by TIAN Hui, a professor from both Peking University and National Astronomical Observatories of Chinese Academy of Sciences (NAOC), has measured the global magnetic field of the solar corona for the first time. (2020-08-20)

Ultrafast electrons in magnetic oxides: A new direction for spintronics?
Special metal oxides could one day replace semiconductor materials that are commonly used today in processors. Now, for the first time, an international team of researchers from Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU), the University of Kaiserslautern and the University of Fribourg in Switzerland was able to observe how electronic charge excitation changes electron spin in metal oxides in an ultrafast and inphase manner. The study was published in the journal ''Nature Communications''. (2020-08-19)

Light swirls provide insights into the quantum world
A new method uses swirls of light to observe previously invisible quantum states of electrons. It was developed by physicists from Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) and an international team of researchers. It delivers new insights into electron motion, which is crucial for material properties such as electrical conductivity, magnetism and molecular structures. The free electron laser FERMI in Italy provided experimental proof and the results were published in the journal 'Nature Photonics'. (2020-08-10)

Spintronics: Researchers show how to make non-magnetic materials magnetic
A complex process can modify non-magnetic oxide materials in such a way to make them magnetic. The basis for this new phenomenon is controlled layer-by-layer growth of each material. An international research team with researchers from Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) reported on their unexpected findings in the journal ''Nature Communications''. (2020-08-06)

When Dirac meets frustrated magnetism
Scientists at the Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics have discovered one of the largest anomalous Hall effects (15,506 siemens per centimeter at 2 Kelvin) ever observed in the new compound, KV3Sb5. This material has a never-before-seen combination of properties: Dirac physics, frustrated magnetism, 2D exfoliatability, and chemical stability. Aside from future fundamental research studying the interplay of these ingredients, the unique combination has potential for next-generation computing technologies like spintronics and quantum computing. (2020-07-31)

Research brief: 'Fool's gold' may be valuable after all
In a breakthrough new study, scientists and engineers at the University of Minnesota have electrically transformed the abundant and low-cost non-magnetic material iron sulfide, also known as 'fool's gold' or pyrite, into a magnetic material. (2020-07-29)

Manipulating non-magnetic atoms in a chromium halide enables tuning of magnetic properties
The magnetic properties of a chromium halide can be tuned by manipulating the non-magnetic atoms in the material, a team, led by Boston College researchers, reports in the most recent edition of ScienceAdvances. The method is based on a mechanism known as an indirect exchange interaction. (2020-07-24)

Princeton scientists discover a topological magnet that exhibits exotic quantum effects
An international team led by researchers at Princeton University has uncovered a new class of magnet that exhibits novel quantum effects that extend to room temperature. Their findings provide insights into a 30-year-old theory of how electrons spontaneously quantize and demonstrate a proof-of-principle method to discover new topological magnets. (2020-07-22)

Wireless aquatic robot could clean water and transport cells
Researchers at Eindhoven University of Technology developed a tiny plastic robot, made of responsive polymers, which moves under the influence of light and magnetism. In the future this 'wireless aquatic polyp' should be able to attract and capture contaminant particles from the surrounding liquid or pick up and transport cells for analysis in diagnostic devices. The researchers published their results in the journal PNAS. (2020-07-14)

The spin state story: Observation of the quantum spin liquid state in novel material
The quantum spin liquid (QSL) state is an exotic state of matter where the spin of electrons, which generally exhibits order at low temperatures, remains disordered. Now, scientists from Tokyo University of Science, Japan, have developed a new material where a two-dimensional QSL state can be experimentally observed, advancing our knowledge of spin behavior, and getting us closer to next-generation ''spintronic'' devices. (2020-07-09)

Spintronics: Faster data processing through ultrashort electric pulses
Physicists at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) and Lanzhou University in China developed a simple concept that could improve significantly magnetic-based data processing. Using ultrashort electric pulses in the terahertz range, data can be written, read and erased very quickly. This would make data processing faster, more compact and energy efficient. The researchers confirmed their theory by running complex simulations and the results were published in the journal NPG Asia Materials. (2020-07-02)

The magnetic history of ice
The history of our planet has been written, among other things, in the periodic reversal of its magnetic poles. Scientists at the Weizmann Institute of Science propose a new means of reading this historic record: in ice. Their findings could lead to a refined probing ice cores and, in the future, might be applied to understanding the magnetic history of other bodies in our solar system, including Mars and Jupiter's moon Europa. (2020-06-28)

Melting a crystal topologically
Physicists at EPFL have successfully melted a very thin crystal of magnetic quasi-particles controllably, as turning ice into water. Novel phases of matter have been discovered and a new model system for fundamental physics studies has been established. (2020-06-15)

Graphene and 2D materials could move electronics beyond 'Moore's Law'
A team of researchers based in Manchester, the Netherlands, Singapore, Spain, Switzerland and the USA has published a new review on a field of computer device development known as spintronics, which could see graphene used as building block for next-generation electronics. (2020-06-03)

Nanoneedles to increase the capacity and robustness of digital memories
Researchers have developed a new technique to locally modify the properties of a metamagnetic material. The method consists in applying local pressure to the surface of the material using nanometric needles and allows a much more easy and local modification than current methods. The research opens the door to a more accurate and precise control of magnetic materials and allows to improve the architecture and capacity of magnetic digital memories. (2020-05-26)

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